Art History

http://arthistory.barnard.edu

500 Diana Center
212-854-2118
212-854-8442 (fax)
email: arthistory@barnard.edu
Department Administrator: Elisabeth Sher

The Department of Art History

Mission

Art History, which is devoted to the study of all the visual arts, is one of the broadest fields in the humanities. It is concerned not only with the nature of works of art – their materiality, form, style, and content--but also with the social, political, and cultural circumstances that shape them and determine their reception. Long identified with the study of European art, the history of art is now dedicated to understanding the visual arts on a global scale. Introductory level courses encourage a basic lifelong understanding and appreciation of works of art produced in various periods and different cultures. Most of our majors take the opportunity offered by Study Abroad to attend courses in locations from Barcelona to Dakar. In addition special arrangements make it possible for students to take courses that travel to artistic centers such as Paris and Berlin. The rest of the curriculum offers a more advanced and specialized knowledge of art which can lead to many kinds of careers, including teaching, museum administration and curating, business positions in galleries or auction houses, publishing, criticism, collection advising, and conservation, as well as work as visual artists in any medium. Students in many fields may also find that art history is relevant to their studies. Not only do courses insist on analytical thinking and writing through multiple assignments that involve rigorous attention to presentational and written skills, but they foster a capacity to understand the ways in which images make meaning. The department, fortunate in being located in New York City, one of the world’s greatest art centers, takes full advantage of the rich resources of the city’s museums and galleries. Courses on the history of the city’s involvement in art bring the city to students while they in turn explore its offerings both privately and through internships in artistic institutions ranging from museums to art periodicals.

Student Learning Outcomes 

Students who graduate with a major or minor in art history will be able to attain the following outcomes:

  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the social, political, and cultural circumstances surrounding the making and viewing works of art in a range of cultural traditions and time periods in a comparative way;
  • Discuss the form, style, and content of a range of works of art;
  • Recognize the methods and theories used to ask significant questions about works of art;
  • Frame and execute their own research projects through the writing of papers, the production of art works or a combination of the two;
  • Express themselves effectively orally, in writing, visually or materially;
  • Study works of art in person.

Chair: Alexander Alberro (Virginia Bloedel Wright Professor of Art History)
Professors: Rosalyn Deutsche (Term Professor), Anne Higonnet, Keith Moxey (emeritus), Jonathan Reynolds
Associate Professors: Elizabeth Hutchinson
Term Assistant Professors: Joseph Ackley, 
Senior Lecturer: Joan Snitzer (Director of Visual Arts Program)
Associate Professor of Professional Practice: John Miller
Adjunct Professors: Maryan Ainsworth, Nicolas Guagnini, Leslie Hewitt, Christopher Phillips, Valerie Smith
Columbia University Department of Art History and Archeology: Zainab Bahrani, Francesco Benelli, Barry Bergdoll, Kaira M. Cabañas, Michael Cole, Jonathan Crary, Francesco de Angelis, Vidya Dehejia, Dawn Delbanco, Noam M. Elcott, David Freedberg, Cordula Grewe, Robert E. Harrist Jr, Christina Hunter, Kellie Jones, Branden W. Joseph, Holger Klein, Rosalind Krauss (University Professor), Matthew McKelway, Kent Minturn, Stephen Murray, Ioannis Mylonopoulos, Esther Pasztory, Prudence Marie Peiffer,  Stephanie Porras, John Rajchman, David Rosand, Jeffrey Saletnik, Simon Schama (University Professor), Robert Schindler, Zoë Strother, Veronica White

Requirements for the Major in Art History

The Major in Art History requires a minimum of 12 art history courses including:

AHIS BC1001Introduction to Art History I4
AHIS BC1002Introduction to the History of Art II4
AHIS BC3970Methods and Theories of Art History (To be taken during the junior or senior year.)4
AHIS BC3959
 - AHIS BC3960
Senior Research Seminar
and Senior Research Seminar *Please see notes below on one and two semester written senior thesis options.
3-6
or AHIS BC3960 Senior Research Seminar
Two Seminar Courses in Art History (may also be counted toward the historical and regional distribution requirement.)
Seven elective courses *See below for elective requirements
  • Courses in film are accepted toward the major requirements; studio courses are not.
  • Recommended: One or two studio courses should be taken.
  • Students who plan to undertake graduate work should acquire a reading knowledge of at least two foreign languages in which major contributions to the history of art have been made. Most graduate schools require a reading knowledge of French, German, or Italian. The department strongly recommends a student's taking one of these languages while at Barnard.

Senior Thesis:
Students write their senior thesis in conjunction with AHIS BC3959 and/or BC3960 Senior Research Seminar. (Please see description of the senior thesis below). Each student will develop, research, and write their thesis project in consultation with an individual faculty member in Art History. They will also attend and participate in group seminars convened during the academic year in which all students will present their work. Students who plan to study abroad during their senior year and those who expect to graduate early must begin the senior research seminar sequence in the second semester of their junior year.

Seven Elective Courses:
Majors must take seven elective courses; these can be lecture or seminar courses. Neither BC1001 and 1002 nor any other broad survey cannot be used to fulfill this requirement. These seven electives must fulfill the following requirements:

Students must take at least one course in three of four historical periods:

  • Ancient (up to 400 CE/AD)
  • 400-1400
  • 1400-1700
  • 1700-present

These chronological divisions are approximate. In case of ambiguities about the eligibility of a course to fill the requirement, please consult the department chair or your advisor.

An additional two courses must also be drawn from at least TWO DIFFERENT world regions, as listed below:

  • Africa
  • Asia and the Indigenous Pacific
  • Latin America, Caribbean and the Indigenous Americas
  • Middle East

The remaining two courses may be any other Art History course.

Requirements for the Major in Art History with Concentration 
in the Visual Arts

Seven Art History courses:
AHIS BC1001Introduction to Art History I4
AHIS BC1002Introduction to the History of Art II4
AHIS BC3031Imagery and Form in the Arts3
One course in 19th or 20th Century Art.
One seminar in Art History.
One additional Art History course.
Five Studio courses:
AHIS BC3530Advanced Studio3
AHIS BC3999Independent Research (to be taken in the senior year)4
Three additional Studio courses.

The Art History Department offers a major with a Concentration in the Visual Arts.   Here, students have the option of doing a studio thesis instead of a written one.  Visual Arts Concentrators work closely with faculty advisors who assists them in planning a program incorporating personal interests while meeting departmental requirements.

Requirements for the Major in Art History with a Visual Arts Concentration

A minimum of 12 courses:

1. BC1001 and 1002 Introduction to Art History. This two-course sequence is required.

2. Art History: BC3031 Imagery and Form in the Arts. To be taken in the spring semester during the junior or senior year.

3. Studio courses: BC3530 Advanced Studio AND BC3999 Senior Independent Project
(to be taken in the Senior year) 
Students produce their senior thesis projects in conjunction with the Advance Studio BC3530 (fall) and Independent Projects BC 3999  (spring) courses.  (Please see description of the senior thesis below). You will develop, research, and create your thesis project in consultation with faculty members and peers in the Visual Arts Concentration. You will also attend and participate in group critiques, and guest artist lectures scheduled during the academic year. You will present your visual art project in two group senior exhibitions scheduled at the end of the Fall and Spring semesters of the senior year.

4.  One Seminar Courses in Art History (may also be counted toward the historical and regional distribution requirement.)

5.  One 19th or 20th century elective courses, in Art History.

6. Two elective courses in Art History

7. Three elective courses in Visual Arts-Studio

*Courses in film are accepted toward the major requirements. 

*Studio courses cannot exceed 30 points of credits.

Art History Written Senior Thesis Option for Visual Arts Concentrators

Art History Majors concentrating in Visual Arts may elect to substitute the Visual Arts Senior Thesis Project for the Art History Written Senior Project. To do this they must:

  • Notify their adviser of their intention to do so by the end of their junior year
  • Take both AHIS BC3970 Methods and Theories of Art History and AHIS BC3959 Senior Research SeminarAHIS BC3960 Senior Research Seminar.

Requirements for the Major in the History and Theory of Architecture

See Architecture Program offerings.

Requirements for the Minor

The minor in Art History consists of five lecture courses, including:  The minor in Art History consists of five courses, including BC1001, BC1002, and three courses in the following areas of which students must have at least one be Non-European.  

AHIS BC1001Introduction to Art History I4
AHIS BC1002Introduction to the History of Art II4
Three courses in the below areas, of which students must have at least one be Non-European.

European and American

  • Ancient
  • Medieval
  • Renaissance
  • Baroque
  • Modern

Non-European

  • Chinese
  • Japanese
  • Indian
  • African
  • Meso-American
  • Native American

AHIS BC1001 Introduction to Art History I. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART)., Discussion Section Required

Attempting to offer an introduction to artistic creation on a global scale, this course is team-taught by specialists in a number of different cultural and historical traditions. In the fall semester we will discuss the art of Europe, the Middle East, India, Japan, and China, in periods ranging from the Paleolithic to the Renaissance. Museum trips are an integral part of the course. Note: weekly discussion groups to be arranged. Discussion Section Required.

Fall 2017: AHIS BC1001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 1001 001/01791 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
4 45

AHIS BC1002 Introduction to the History of Art II. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART)., Discussion Section Required

  The second part of the Introduction to Art History goes from about 1400 to 2015, circles the world, and includes all media. It is organized around one theme for each lecture, and approximately 100 works of art. Visits to New York museums and discussions sections are crucial parts of the course.

Spring 2017: AHIS BC1002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 1002 001/01823 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
304 Barnard Hall
Anne Higonnet 4 177

AHIS BC2001 Drawing Studio: Empirical Studies. 3 points.

Note course is limited to 15 students with instructor's permission on the first day of class.

Drawing is a foundation for all other forms of visual art. This studio course is primarily a workshop augmented by home assignments, visiting artist lectures and museum/gallery visits. This class is open to all students from introductory to more advanced levels. The semester is divided into two sections: (1) Perspective and (2) The Body. Starting with perspective, the goal is to explore the history and contemporary importance of this form;  then shift to the body, where the goal is to build a visual language that records the human form in space and in time.  This course uses the practice of drawings as a tool to interrogate the meaning of observation in the practice of art.

Fall 2017: AHIS BC2001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 2001 001/04250 Th 9:00am - 12:50pm
Room TBA
3 14

AHIS BC2005 Painting I and III. 3 points.

Course Limited to 15 Students. Permission of Instructor. Attend the first Class.

This course will focus on individual and collaborative projects designed to explore the fundamental principles of image making. Students acquire a working knowledge of concepts in contemporary art through class critiques, discussion, and individual meetings with the professor.  Reading materials will provide historical and philosophical background to the class assignments.  Class projects will range from traditional to experimental and multi-media. Image collections will be discussed in class with an awareness of contemporary image production.

Fall 2017: AHIS BC2005
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 2005 001/05809 W 2:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Joan Snitzer 3 33

AHIS BC2006 Painting II and IV. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15 students. Instructor's permission required. Attend the first day of class.

A continuation of painting I & III, open to all skill levels.  Students will further develop techniques to communicate individual and collective ideas in painting.  This course will focus on individual and collaborative projects designed to explore the fundamental principles of image making.  Students acquire a working knowledge of traditional studio skills and related concepts in contemporary art through class critiques, discussion, and individual meetings with the professor.  Reading materials will provide historical and philosophical background to the class assignments.  Class projects will range from traditional to experimental and multi-media. Image collections will be discussed in class with an awareness of contemporary image production.

Spring 2017: AHIS BC2006
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 2006 001/02013 W 2:10pm - 6:00pm
402 Diana Center
Joan Snitzer 3 10

AHIS BC2007 Painting I and III. 3 points.

Course Limited to 15 Students. Permission of Instructor. Attend the first Class.

This course will focus on individual and collaborative projects designed to explore the fundamental principles of image making. Students acquire a working knowledge of concepts in contemporary art through class critiques, discussion, and individual meetings with the professor.  Reading materials will provide historical and philosophical background to the class assignments.  Class projects will range from traditional to experimental and multi-media. Image collections will be discussed in class with an awareness of contemporary image production.

Fall 2017: AHIS BC2007
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 2007 001/04593 W 2:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Joan Snitzer 3 3

AHIS BC2008 Painting II and IV. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15 students. Instructor's permission required. Attend the first day of class.

A continuation of painting I & III, open to all skill levels.  Students will further develop techniques to communicate individual and collective ideas in painting.  This course will focus on individual and collaborative projects designed to explore the fundamental principles of image making.  Students acquire a working knowledge of traditional studio skills and related concepts in contemporary art through class critiques, discussion, and individual meetings with the professor.  Reading materials will provide historical and philosophical background to the class assignments.  Class projects will range from traditional to experimental and multi-media. Image collections will be discussed in class with an awareness of contemporary image production.

Spring 2017: AHIS BC2008
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 2008 001/02328 W 2:10pm - 6:00pm
402 Diana Center
Joan Snitzer 3 5

AHIS BC2012 Drawing Studio: Extended Projects. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15 students. Instructor's permission required. Attend the first day of class.

This class will explore drawing as an open-ended way of working and thinking. The class is designed to expose students to the practice of drawing in our contemporary context. Though this is primarily a studio course, class critiques of student work are augmented by feedback from guest artists, lectures  and museum/gallery trips. Throughout the semester, students will discuss their work one-on-one with the instructor and as a group. Starting with individual projects, we will investigate drawing as a practice involving diverse forms of visual culture and collaboration.

Spring 2017: AHIS BC2012
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 2012 001/05421 W 10:00am - 1:50pm
402 Diana Center
Nicolas Guagnini 3 7

AHIS BC3003 Supervised Projects in Photography. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Enrollment limited to 15 students. Instructor's permission required. Attend the first day of class.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 15 students.

Designed for students to conduct independent projects in photography. Priority for enrollment to the class will be Barnard College students who are enrolling in classes at ICP (International Center of Photography).  The cost of ICP will be covered by Barnard College. All of the other students enrolling in the course (CC, GS SOA) will be responsible for their own ICP course expenses.

Spring 2017: AHIS BC3003
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3003 001/03690 M 11:00am - 12:50pm
402 Diana Center
John Miller 3 20
Fall 2017: AHIS BC3003
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3003 001/07389 M 11:00am - 12:50pm
Room TBA
John Miller 3 21

AHIS BC3015 Synthesis: An Approach to Mixed-Media. 3 points.

Visual Arts Studio course limited to 15 students. Instructor’s permission required. Attend the first day of class.

Synthesis: the composition, combination or transformation of parts or elements to form a whole. This studio course will explore the unique position of combining various mediums and techniques in the visual arts platform.  What does it mean to use principles of drawing in the making of a photograph? Why explore sculptural forms through the materiality of painting? The course will look closely at a select group of contemporary artists who move fluidly through various forms and modes of working.  The course consists of the following key areas: material, form, concept, intersection and synthesis. Through out the studio course, students will address conceptual, formal and process-oriented issues related to working across mediums in the visual arts.

AHIS BC3031 Imagery and Form in the Arts. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Enrollment limited to 15 students. Instructor's permission required. Attend the first day of class. Application not required.

Operation of imagery and form in dance, music, theater, visual arts and writing; students are expected to do original work in one of these arts. Concepts in contemporary art will be explored.

Spring 2017: AHIS BC3031
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3031 001/03350 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
501 Diana Center
Joan Snitzer 3 9
AHIS 3031 001/03350 M 4:00pm - 5:00pm
402 Diana Center
Joan Snitzer 3 9

AHIS BC3123 Woman and Art. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Discussion of the methods necessary to analyze visual images of women in their historical, racial, and class contexts, and to understand the status of women as producers, patrons, and audiences of art and architecture.

AHIS BC3345 Islamic Architecture: the Mongol Legacy, 1250-1650. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The destruction of Baghdad in 1258 by the armies of the Golden Horde predicated a profound change in Islamic society whose influence was felt from Egypt to India, and from Samarqand to Istanbul. This course examines the architecture commissioned by the Ottoman, Mamluk, Safavid, Uzbek and Mughal rulers and the new cities they founded to further their unique imperial visions.

AHIS BC3350 Medieval Art in the West. 3 points.

Medieval painting, sculpture, and precious arts from Late Antiquity to c. 1400, including early Byzantine, early Islamic, Merovingian, Visigothic, Insular, Carolingian, Ottonian, Mozarabic, Anglo-Saxon, and especially Romanesque and Gothic art. Questions include those of style, function, material, historical context, the earthly, the divine, ornament, the figural, and the geographic Other.

AHIS BC3530 Advanced Studio. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 15 students. Permission of the instructor.

An interpretive study of the theoretical and critical issues in visual art. Projects that are modeled after major movements in contemporary art will be executed in the studio. Each student develops an original body of artwork and participates in group discussions of the assigned readings.

Fall 2017: AHIS BC3530
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3530 001/01726 M 2:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Joan Snitzer 3 16

AHIS BC3626 In and Around Abstract Expressionism. 3 points.

This course focuses on the history of the artistic phenomenon of abstract expressionism in the United States, Europe, Latin America and Japan. To place abstract expressionism within its proper historical context, we will explore the modern, anti-modern, avant-garde, and neo-avant-garde artistic practices that have been elaborated in various ways in different locations from the 1920s to the 1960s, and the major critical and historical accounts of modernism in the arts during these years.

AHIS BC3642 North American Art and Culture. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An examination of North American painting, sculpture, photography, graphic art and decorative arts from the Colonial Period until World War I. Artists discussed will include Benjamin West, John Singleton Copley, Thomas Cole, Lilly Martin Spencer, Harriet Powers, Rafael Aragon, Robert Duncanson, Frederick Church, Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins, James MacNeill Whistler, Mary Cassatt, Thomas Moran, Henry Ossawa Tanner and Eadweard Muybridge.

AHIS BC3654 Institutional Critique. 3 points.

Examines precedents for institutional critique in the strategies of early twentieth-century historical avant-garde and the post-war neo-avant-garde. Explores ideas about the institution and violence, investigates the critique and elaboration of institutional critique from the late 1970s to the early 1990s, and considers the legacies of institutional critiques in the art of the present.

AHIS BC3655 The Discourse of Public Art and Public Space. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examination of the meaning of the term “public space” in contemporary debates in art, architecture, and urban discourse and the place of these debates within broader controversies over the meaning of democracy. Readings include Theodor Adorno, Vito Acconci, Michel de Certeau, Douglas Crimp, Thomas Crow, Jurgen Habermas, David Harvey, Fredric Jameson, Miwon Kwon, Henri Lefebvre, Bruce Robbins, Michael Sorkin, Mark Wigley, and Krzysztof Wodiczko.

AHIS BC3658 History and Theory of the Avant Garde. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Courses in nineteenth- and/or twentieth-century art are recommended as prerequisites for this course.

This course examines the idea and practice of artistic avant-gardism in Europe and the United States from the mid-nineteenth to the late-twentieth century. It explores the changing relationship of avant-gardism to bourgeois society, concepts of democracy, art institutions, political radicalism, and non-art forms of culture, such as mass culture and third-world cultures. It studies theories of the modernist, historical, and neo-avant-gardes.    

AHIS BC3662 18th Century Art. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

From the rococo to neo-classicism, this lecture course studies the century of Enlightenment, nascent consumer culture, early industrialization, and political revolution.

AHIS BC3673 History of Photography. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required

This course will survey selected social, cultural and aesthetic or technical developments in the history of photography, from the emergence of the medium in the 1820s and 30s through to the present day. Rather than attempt comprehensively to review every aspect of photography and its legacies in the nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries, the course will instead trace significant developments through a series of case studies. Some of the latter will focus on individuals, genres or movements, and others on various discourses of the photographic image.  Particular attention will be placed on methodological and theoretical concerns pertaining to the medium.

AHIS BC3674 Art since 1945. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Introduction to the history of art in post-war Europe and the United States from 1945 to the present, emphasizing questions of methodology of modernist studies and the diversity of theoretical approaches.

AHIS BC3675 Feminism and Postmodernism and the Visual Arts: The 1970's and 1980's. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines art and criticism of the 1970s and 1980s that were informed by feminist and postmodern ideas about visual representation. Explores postmodernism as (1) a critique of modernism, (2) a critique of representation, and (3) what Gayatri Spivak called a radical acceptance of vulnerability. Studies art informed by feminist ideas about vision and subjectivity. Places this art in relation to other aesthetic phenomena, such as modernism, minimalism, institution-critical art, and earlier feminist interventions in art.

AHIS BC3681 Directions in Contemporary Art. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Introduces the history of contemporary artistic practices from the 1960s to the present, and the major critical and historical accounts of modernism and postmodernism in the arts. Focusing on the interrelationships between modernist culture and the emerging concepts of postmodern and contemporary art, the course addresses a wide range of historical and methodological questions.

AHIS BC3682 Early Modernism and the Crisis of Representation. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: 20th Century Art recommended.

This course studies the emergence and development of Modernism in all of its complexity. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which Modern artists responded to the dramatically changing notions of space, time and dimension in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. What impact did these dramatic changes have on existing concepts of representation? What challenges did they pose for artists? To what extent did Modernism contribute to an understanding of the full consequences of these new ideas of time and space? These concerns will lead us to examine some of the major critical and historical accounts of modernism in the arts as they were developed between the 1860s and the 1920s.

AHIS BC3687 Modern Japanese Art. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This class will explore Japanese painting, prints, photography and performance art from the mid-19th century to the present. We will consider artists' responses to rapid modernization, debates over cultural identity, and the ever-changing role of "tradition" in modern art practice. We will also discuss the impact of natural disaster and war on the arts, and the role of art in mediating social conflict. There are no prerequisites, but the survey of Japanese art history and classes in modern Japanese studies would provide useful background.

AHIS BC3939 Contemporary Photography. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Undergraduate seminar course. Course limited to 15 Students with instructor's permission. Application process required. Applications are due in the Barnard Art History office April 7th.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This undergraduate seminar will explore key texts that have informed the current condition and possibilities of the medium of photography.The course readings will consist of writings by critics and historians which reflect the unstable status of the photographic object between: technology and culture, mass culture and avant-garde art, discourse and documentation, analogue and digital.

AHIS BC3948 The Visual Culture of the Harlem Renaissance. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 15 students. Barnard Art History seminar application required. See dept. website for application and instructions. www.barnard.edu/arthist

Introduction to the paintings, photographs, sculptures, films, and graphic arts of the Harlem Renaissance and the publications, exhibitions, and institutions involved in the production and consumption of images of African-Americans. Focuses on impact of Black northward and transatlantic migration and the roles of region, class, gender, and sexuality.

AHIS BC3949 The Art of Witness: Memorials and Historical Trauma. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Undergraduate seminar course. Course limited to 15 Students with instructor's permission. Application process required. Applications are due in the Barnard Art History office April 9, 2015.

Examines aesthetic responses to collective historical traumas, such as slavery, the Holocaust, the bombing of Hiroshima, AIDS, homelessness, immigration, and the recent attack on the World Trade Center. Studies theories about trauma, memory, and representation. Explores debates about the function and form of memorials.

AHIS BC3950 Photography and Video in Asia. 4 points.

Undergraduate seminar course. Course limited to 15 Students with instructor's permission. Application process required. Applications are due in the Barnard Art History office April 9, 2015.

East Asia is now perhaps the world’s most dynamic region, and its dramatic social and economic transformation has been mirrored in the work of a host of startlingly original and innovative visual artists. The class will explore the ideas and visual idioms that inform the leading contemporary photo artists in China, Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. We will begin with a historical survey of the development of photography in East Asia since the mid-19th century, but we will concentrate on the period from 1960 to the present.  Figures whose work will be explored include such Japanese artists and photographers as Eikoh Hosoe, Daido Moriyama, Tomatsu Shomei, Miyako Ishiuchi, Nobuyoshi Araki, Yasumasa Morimura, Moriko Mori, Naoya Hatakeyema, and Tomoko Sawada. From China, we will examine the work of artists like Zhang Huan, Hong Hao, Yang Fudong, Lin Tianmiao, and Xing Danwen, while Korean artists to be covered include Atta Kim andYeondoo Jung. Since many of these artists work regularly in video as well as photography, there will be regular video screenings throughout the semester.

Fall 2017: AHIS BC3950
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3950 001/04024 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Christopher Phillips 4 31

AHIS BC3951 Contemporary Art and the Public Sphere. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: AHIS BC1001 - AHIS BC1002 or equivalent. Enrollment Limited to 15 students. Permission of the instructor. Preference to seniors and Art History majors.

Critically examines contemporary debates about the meaning of public art and public space, placing them within broader controversies over definitions of urban life and democracy. Explores ideas about what it means to bring the term "public" into proximity with the term "art." Considers the differing ideas about social unity that inform theories of public space as well as feminist criticism of the masculine presumptions underlying certain critical theories of public space/art.

AHIS BC3952 Art and Mass/Popular/Everyday Culture: 1850 to the Present. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: AHIS BC1001 - AHIS BC1002 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 15 students. Permission of the instructor. Preference to seniors and Art History majors.

Examines interactions between art in Europe and the United States during the 19th and 20th centuries, on the one hand, and non-art forms of culture that are called variously "mass," "popular," and "everyday" culture, on the other. Places art/mass culture interactions within the rise of bourgeois society, the invention of democracy, and relations of class, gender, sexuality, and race. Studies major critical theories and debates about the relationship between art and mass culture.

AHIS BC3957 1980s Feminism and Postmodernism in the Visual Arts. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: AHIS BC1001 - AHIS BC1002 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 15 students. Permission of the instructor. Preference to seniors and Art History majors.

Examination of art and criticism that is informed by feminist and postmodern ideas about subjectivity in visual representation which first achieved prominence in the late 1970s and 1980s, exerting a profound influence on contemporary aesthetic practice. Explored in relation to earlier concepts of feminism, modernism, social art history, and "art as institution." Artworks discussed include those of Barbara Kruger, Cindy Sherman, Louise Lawler, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Hans Haacke, Mary Kelly, and Catherine Opie, among others.

AHIS BC3959 Senior Research Seminar. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Course open to Barnard Art History majors only.

Independent research for the senior thesis. Students develop and write their senior thesis in consultation with an individual faculty adviser in art history and participate in group meetings scheduled throughout the senior year.

Fall 2017: AHIS BC3959
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3959 001/07493 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
Rosalyn Deutsche 3 14

AHIS BC3960 Senior Research Seminar. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Course open to Barnard Art History majors only.

Independent research for the senior thesis. Students develop and write their senior thesis in consultation with an individual faculty adviser in Art History and participate in group meetings scheduled throughout the senior year.

Spring 2017: AHIS BC3960
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3960 001/05407 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
501 Diana Center
Rosalyn Deutsche 3 25

AHIS BC3961 Winslow Homer and American Realism. 4 points.

Seminar course limited to 15 undergraduates.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Winslow Homer is in many ways the quintessential American Realist.  One need only glance at his sunny pictures of women playing croquet or his stunning snapshots of surf breaking on the Maine Coast to recognize the bold graphic energy of his work and its seemingly national subject matter.  Homer was promoted as an untrained and naive observer of his time, but in fact he was a sophisticated artists with extensive engagement in the evolving aesthetic and cultural dialogues of the late nineteenth century in America and abroad.  In this course, we will get beyond the surface of Homer's art, interrogating how these qualities have come to signal what they do while examining the course of his career in its art historical and historical contexts.  Rather than seeing Homer as a realist simply documenting his time, students will come to understand the ways in which his work raises and attempts to address key questions posed in the United States as it recovered from the Civil War and experienced the rapid urbanization and industrialization of the Post-War era.  Through the close examination of Homer's output in a variety of mediums, including illustration, painting, watercolor and etchings, we will explore Homer's deep engagement with the international aesthetic developments of Impressionism, Aestheticism and Realism.  Class meetings will be augmented by two field trips, one to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the other to the Century Club.

AHIS BC3968 Art/Criticism I. 4 points.

Undergraduate seminar course. Course limited to 15 Students with instructor's permission. Application process required. Applications are due in the Barnard Art History office April 9, 2015.

This course is a seminar on contemporary art criticism written by artists in the post war period.  Such criticism differs from academic criticism because it construes art production less as a discrete object of study than as a point of engagement.  It also differs from journalistic criticism because it is less obliged to report art market activity and more concerned with polemics.   Art /Criticism I will trace the course of these developments by examining the art and writing of one artist each week.  These will include Brian O’Doherty/Patrick Ireland, Allan Kaprow, Robert Morris, Yvonne Rainer, Robert Smithson, Art & Language, Dan Graham, Adrian Piper, Mary Kelly, Martha Rosler, Judith Barry and Andrea Fraser.  We will consider theoretical and practical implications of each artist’s oeuvre.

Fall 2017: AHIS BC3968
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3968 001/07232 T 11:00am - 12:50pm
Room TBA
John Miller 4 14

AHIS BC3969 Art/Criticism II. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Course Limited to 15 Students with Instructor's Permission. Application due 11/13/15. Go to the BC AH website for more information and to download an application. www.barnard.edu/arthist

This course is a seminar on contemporary art criticism written by artists in the post war period.  Such criticism differs from academic criticism because it construes art production less as a discrete object of study than as a point of engagement.  It also differs from journalistic criticism because it is less obliged to report art market activity and more concerned with polemics.  Artists will include Ad Reinhart, Daniel Buren, Helio Oiticica, Juan Downey, Hollis Frampton, Victor Burgin, Jeff Wall, Mike Kelley, Coco Fusco, Maria Eichhorn, Jutta Koether, Melanie Gilligan.

Spring 2017: AHIS BC3969
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3969 001/06666 T 11:00am - 12:50pm
501 Diana Center
Nicolas Guagnini 4 10

AHIS BC3970 Methods and Theories of Art History. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Prerequisites: Barnard Art History Major Requirement. Enrollment limited only to Barnard Art History majors.

Introduction to critical writings that have shaped histories of art, including texts on iconography and iconology, the psychology of perception, psychoanalysis, social history, feminism and gender studies, structuralism, semiotics, and post-structuralism.

Fall 2017: AHIS BC3970
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3970 001/08145 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Elizabeth Hutchinson 4 6
AHIS 3970 002/06349 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Jonathan Reynolds 4 13

AHIS BC3971 Rococco and It's Revivials. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The useful arts of eighteenth-century France – furniture, interior decoration, clothing etc.. --  have always been considered among the masterpieces of decorative arts history.  A revolution in scholarship has made it possible to understand how these objects inaugurated some of modernity’s key values: individualism, private home life, consumer culture, women’s involvement in the arts, global capitalism, and an orientalist fascination with the Near and Far Easts.  Several class sessions will take place in the great decorative arts galleries of the Metropolitan Museum and the Frick Collection, where students will give presentations on individual objects.

AHIS BC3976 Japanese Photography. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will examine the history of Japanese photography from the middle of the 19th century to the present. The class will be organized both chronologically and thematically. Throughout its history, photography has been an especially powerful medium for addressing the most challenging issues facing Japanese society. Among the topics under discussion will be: tourist photography and the representation of women within that genre in the late 19th century, the politics of propaganda photography, the construction of Japanese cultural identity through the representation of  “tradition” in photography, and the interest in marginalized urban subcultures in the photography of the 1960s and 1970s. Although the course will be focused on Japan, the class will read from the literature on photography elsewhere in order to situate Japanese work within a broader context.

AHIS BC3984 Curatorial Positions 1969 to the Present. 4 points.

Course Limited to 15 Students with Instructor's Permission. Application due 11/13/15. Go to the BC AH website for more information and to download an application. www.barnard.edu/arthist

Contemporary exhibitions studied through a selection of great shows from roughly 1969 to the present that defined a generation.  This course will not offer practical training in curating; rather it will concentrate on the historical context of exhibitions, the theoretical basis for their argument, the criteria for the choice in artists and their work, and exhibitions’ internal/external reception.

Spring 2017: AHIS BC3984
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3984 001/06989 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
308 Diana Center
Valerie Smith 4 8

AHIS BC3985 Introduction To Connoisseurship. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Please see Barnard College Art History Department's website for instructions.

Factors involved in judging works of art, with emphasis on paintings; materials; technique, condition, attribution; identification of imitations and fakes; questions of relative quality.

Fall 2017: AHIS BC3985
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3985 001/05003 M 9:00am - 10:50am
Room TBA
4 17

AHIS BC3990 Japanese Prints: Images of Japan's Floating World. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 15 students. Permission of the instructor. Sophomore standing.

Ukiyo-e, the "images of the floating world," present a vivid and highly romanticized vision of the dynamic urban culture of Japan during the 17th through 19th centuries. Considers ways in which these images promoted kabuki theater, glamorized life in the licensed prostitution quarters, and represented sexuality and gender. We will study how print designers and publishers dodged government censorship as they ruthlessly parodied contemporary life, literature, and venerable artistic traditions.

AHIS BC3999 Independent Research. 4 points.

Independent research, primarily for the senior essay, under a chosen faculty adviser and with the chair’s permission

Spring 2017: AHIS BC3999
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3999 001/01403 M 5:00pm - 7:00pm
402 Diana Center
John Miller 4 12
Fall 2017: AHIS BC3999
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3999 001/01403  
Joan Snitzer 4 2

AHIS V3080 Pre-Columbian Art and Architecture. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Survey of the pre-Hispanic art of Mesoamerica, Central America, and the Andean region from the earliest times to the Spanish conquest.

AHIS V3201 Arts of China. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An introduction to the arts of China, from the Neolithic period to the present, stressing materials and processes of bronze casting, the development of representational art, principles of text illustration, calligraphy, landscape painting, imperial patronage, and the role of the visual arts in elite culture.

AHIS V3203 The Arts of Japan. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required

Introduction to the painting, sculpture, and architecture of Japan from the Neolithic period through the present. Discussion focuses on key monuments within their historical and cultural contexts.

AHIS V3248 Greek Art and Architecture. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Introduction to the art and architecture of the Greek world during the archaic, classical, and Hellenistic periods (11th - 1st centuries B.C.E.).

AHIS V3250 Roman Art and Architecture. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The architecture, sculpture, and painting of ancient Rome from the 2nd century B.C. to the end of the Empire in the West.

AHIS V3400 Italian Renaissance Painting. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The origins and development of Renaissance painting: humanism and religion, perspective and art theory, the revival of the classical form and content. Emphasis on major centers, especially Florence and Venice and the courts, and on the major masters: Mascaccio, Fra Angelico, Piero della Francesca, Giovanni Bellini, Leonardo da Vinci

AHIS V3464 Later Italian Art. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course offers an overview of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy from about 1475 to about 1600. It concentrates on artists in four geographical areas and periods: (1) Florence in the late-15th and early-16th centuries (Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo); (2) Rome from 1502 to about 1534 (Bramante, Michelangelo, Raphael); (3) Florence from 1520 to 1565 (Andrea del Sarto, Pontormo, Bronzino, Cellini); and (4) Venice from about 1500 to 1588 (Bellini, Giorgione, Titian, Veronese, Tintoretto, Jacopo Sansovino).

AHIS V3607 Latin American Artists: Independence to Today. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course looks at works produced in the more than 20 countries that make up Latin America.  Our investigations will take us from the Southern Cone nations of South America, up through Central American and the Caribbean, to Mexico in the north.  We will cover styles from the colonial influences present in post-independence art of the early 19th century, to installation art from the beginning of the 21st century.  Along the way we will consider such topics as the relationship of colonial style and academic training to forging an independent artistic identity; the emergence and establishment of a modern canon; experimentations in surrealism, neo-concretism, conceptual art, and performance. We will end the course with a consideration of Latino artists working in the U.S.

AHIS V3662 Eighteenth Century Art in Europe. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The term "Enlightenment" refers to the phenomenon of emancipation that spread across Europe in the 18th century, including emancipation from the religious discourse that regulated behaviors in the public and private spheres during the 17th century. In contrast, in the 18th century, human reason and human sensibility became the new dominant modes of apprehension of the world. This course examines how artists responded to this rise of subjectivity, in the context of the transformation of the 18th-century cultural, social and economic landscape. Topics of discussion will include: the birth of art criticism; the development of the art market; the phenomenon of "exoticisms;" domesticity and the cult of sensibility; the ascension of women artists and patrons; traveling artists and amateurs; and the new classicism.

AHIS V3673 History of Photography. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Few media have shaped the course of modernity more powerfully than photography. Law, science, journalism, criminology, urban planning, and entertainment are but a handful of the fields remade by the introduction of photography. More ambivalent has been photography's relationship to art. Once relegated to the margins, photographic practices now occupy the center of much artistic production. This course will not attempt a comprehensive survey of the medium. Rather, we will trace central developments through a series of case studies from photography's 19th century birth to its current, digital afterlife. We will cover seminal movements and figures as well as more obscure practices and discourses. Particular attention will be paid to the theoretical and methodological questions concerning the medium.

AHIS V3895 Introductory Colloquium: The Literature and Methods of Art History. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An introduction to different methodological approaches to art history as well as a variety of critical texts by such authors as W�lfflin, Riegl, Panofsky, and Gombrich.

AHIS V4436 Florentine Sculpture From Donatello To Michelangelo. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The origins of Renaissance sculpture in Florence, beginning with the competition of 1401 for the Baptistry doors. The art of Donatello, Ghiberti Desiderio, Bernardo Rosselino, Verrocchio, Antonio Pollaiuolo, Benedetto da Maiano and Michelangelo examined in detail.

AHIS W3020 Drawings and Prints. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will consider the graphic media from the Renaissance to the 20th century, with particular attention to the analysis of linear structure and the phenomenology of drawing, the position of drwaing, in both theory and practice, as the foundation of pictorial expression and representation. With attention to teh full history of graphic expression, the course will focus on the work of individual artists- including Pisanello, Leonardo, Durer, Raphael, Michelangelo, Rembrandt, Tiepolo, Piranesi, Goya, Daumier, Picasso and Matisse.

AHIS W3110 The Athenian Acropolis in the 5th & 6th Centuries BCE. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course places the architecture and the sculptural decoration of the Parthenon in the centre of the scheduled class sessions. The course also aims at a contextualisation of the Parthenon within the broader architectural, artistic, and topographical context of the Athenian Acropolis during the sixth and fifth centuries BCE. The chosen chronological frame focuses on the period of the most intensive activity on the Acropolis. Two class sessions will, nevertheless, give a brief overview of the Acropolis after the end of the Peloponnesian war and concentrate on the transformation of the Acropolis into “Greece’s museum of the past”, an Arcadian topos of human imagination.

AHIS W3200 Medieval Millennium: Objects of Desire. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Undergraduate students must register for a discussion section, time tba on the Directory of Classes. Students are invited to construct the Middle Ages around a sequence of objects in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. These precious relics of a distant past, now made available as digital images on a website, invite interaction and response: they become objects of desire.

AHIS W3205 Introduction to Japanese Painting. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A survey of the multifaceted forms of Japanese painting from antiquity through the early modern period. major themes to be considered include: painting as an expression of faith; the interplay indigenous and imported pictorial paradigms; narrative and decorative traditions; the emergence of individual artistic agency; the rise of woodblock prints and their impact on European painting in the nineteenth century.

AHIS W3208 The Arts of Africa. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Introduction to the arts of Africa, including masquerading, figural sculpture, reliquaries, power objects, textiles, painting, photography, and architecture. The course will establish a historical framework for study, but will also address how various African societies have responded to the process of modernity.

AHIS W3230 Medieval Architecture. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Developed collaboratively and taught digitally spanning one thousand years of architecture.

AHIS W3234 Medieval Art II: Romanesque and Gothic. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This lecture course is intended for students with little or no background in medieval art.  It provides an introduction to a period of one thousand years (fourth to fourteenth centuries) employing a dialectical interaction between memories of the imperial past and the dynamic, forward-moving force of “Gothic.”  We will survey all aspects of artistic production, with especial emphasis upon architecture and monumental sculpture.  In the last part of the term we will turn to some of the principal themes of medieval art, focusing upon objects accessible to the students in the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Cloisters.

AHIS W3340 Masterpieces of the Art of China, Korea, and Japan. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The decorative arts of ceramics, lacquers, and jades; Buddhist art, architecture, sculpture; and later painting. Museum laboratory sessions.

AHIS W3407 Early Italian Art. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An introduction to the origins and early development of Italian Renaissance painting as a mode of symbolic communication between 1300-1600. Artists include Giotto, Fra Angelico, Masaccio, Mantegna, and Leonardo da Vinci. Emphasis on centers of painting in Florence, Siena, Assisi, Venice and Rome.

AHIS W3410 Approaches to Contemporary Art. 3 points.

This course examines the critical approaches to contemporary art from the 1970s to the present. It will address a range of historical and theoretical issues around the notion of "the contemporary" (e.g. globalization, participation, relational art, ambivalence, immaterial labor) as it has developed in the era after the postmodernism of the 1970s and 1980s.

AHIS W3508 Rembrandt. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.
Close study of Rembrandt's inventiveness as both painter and draughtsman, and of his complicated relationship with both his contemporary culture and the art of the past

AHIS W3600 Nineteenth-Century Art. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course examines selected topics in the history of European painting from the 1780s to 1900. It will explore a range of aesthetic, cultural and social issues through the work of major figures from David, Goya, and Turner to Manet, Seurat and Cezanne. This is a no laptop, no e-device course.

AHIS W3606 Visual Arts in Imperial Spain 1470-1600. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course will survey Renaissance art in Hapsburg Spain, considered in the wide geographical context of the extended and dispersed dominions of the different crowns of the Spanish monarchy, which connected the Iberian Peninsula with Italy, Flanders and the New World. It will concern visual art in its various media, mainly painting, sculpture and architecture, but also tapestries, prints, armor, goldsmithery and ephemeral decoration, among others. Works of the main artists of the period will be introduced and analyzed, giving attention to the historical and cultural context of their production and reception. The course will particularly focus on the movement of artists, works and models within the Spanish Hapsburg territories, in order to understand to what extent visual arts contributed to shaping the political identity of this culturally composite empire.

AHIS W3645 20th Century Architecture/City Planning. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This undergraduate lecture course is an introduction to key topics in the history and theory of modern architecture and urbanism of the twentieth century, primarily focusing on developments in Europe and the United States, complemented with selected case studies from countries in Latin America and Asia. The course does not systematically cover all the major events, ideas, protagonists, and buildings of the period. It is organized around thematic and sometimes monographic lectures, which are intended to represent the essential character of modern architecture from its beginnings around 1900 until more recent developments at the end of the century.

AHIS W3650 Twentieth-Century Art. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART)., Discussion Section Required
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

  The course will examine a variety of figures, movements, and practices within the entire range of 20th-century art—from Expressionism to Abstract Expressionism, Constructivism to Pop Art, Surrealism to Minimalism, and beyond–situating them within the social, political, economic, and historical contexts in which they arose.  The history of these artistic developments will be traced through the development and mutual interaction of two predominant strains of artistic culture: the modernist and the avant-garde, examining in particular their confrontation with and development of the particular vicissitudes of the century’s ongoing modernization.  Discussion section complement class lectures.  Course is a prerequisite for certain upper-level art history courses.

AHIS W3770 Art, Media and the Avant-Garde. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

At the center of the avant-garde imagination—and the interwar period in Europe more broadly—were photography and film. Long relegated to the margins of art history and rarely studied together, photography and film were often the guiding lights and vehicles for mass dissemination of avant-garde images and techniques. This lecture course delves into interbellum art, photography, film, and critical writing as it surveys a range of avant-garde movements and national cinemas; seminal artists and theorists; and topics such as montage, abstraction, technological media, archives, advertising, sites and architectures of reception. Film screenings will take place most weeks.

AHIS W3810 Ivory Carvings, 400-1400: Cross Cultural Interactions. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The art of carving ivory was (and still is) a craft contingent upon the availability of imported elephant tusks, from either South East Asia or, more frequently, from the African continent.  The shifting winds of trade routes offer an interpretive paradigm with which to analyze ivory objects from a variety of different cultural groups: the lack or abundance of ivory and the resulting desire for or surfeit of the material shapes its meaning and use throughout the Mediterranean basin.  The study of ivory objects also allows us to investigate the rich intercultural interactions between Eastern and Western Christians, and both of these with the Islamic world.  This class will include visits to the American Museum of Natural History, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Cloisters.  Reading knowledge of a foreign research language is strongly recommended (French, Italian, German, Spanish, Arabic).

AHIS W3812 The Study of Gothic Architecture. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The seminar has three parts: first, after a brief exploration of issues of mapping and plotting Gothic, we will follow a sequence of readings in some of the giants of older historiography, second, we will study the sea change in the field that began in the 1980s and the work of some of the most dynamic scholars in the subsequent period, and third, students will present their research papers.

AHIS W3813 Materiality in the Middle Ages. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar will examine the significance of various materials and media in visual culture of the Mediterranean and Medieval Europe. From the sumptuous (gold, silver, ivory, gemstones, silk) to the sacred (earth, bones, blood, paint wood), we will address not only the symbolism of raw materials and the techniques of their manipulation, but their aesthetic, sensual, and cultural dimensions as well. How did particular materials shape the medieval viewer’s optic/haptic encounters with objects? Did their use in different spheres, whether cultic, courtly, or diplomatic, impact meaning? In addition to these questions, we will attend to the intercultural appeal of certain media along with the reuse and spoliation of specific objects among cultures: for instance, Sassanian rock crystal carvings in European courtly life, Byzantine silks in European funerary contexts, or ivories from Islamic Spain repurposed as Christian reliquaries. This course will include visits to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Cloisters, and The Hispanic Society of America Museum.

AHIS W3814 The Enchanted World of German Romantic Prints, 1750-1850. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The Enchanted World of German Romantic Prints 1770 – 1850 will open in Philadelphia in late 2013 and travel to several venues. Drawn entirely from Philadelphia Museum of Art’s uniquely rich holdings of more than 8,000 prints by 800 German School painters and printmakers of this period, the exhibition will feature 125 works by leading Austrian, German, and Swiss artists working at home and abroad, including Josef Danhauser, Caspar David Friedrich, Ludwig Emil Grimm, Carl Wilhelm Kolbe, Ferdinand Olivier, Johann Christian Reinhart, Ludwig Richter, Karl Friedrich Schinkel, and Philipp Otto Runge, and Adrian Zingg. Spanning eight decades, from the first stirrings of a Romantic sensibility among German-speaking writers and artists in the 1770s to the pan-European uprisings of 1848/49, the selected works mirror many of the sweeping social and political changes that occurred during these turbulent times, reflecting such significant new trends in the arts as the growing appreciation of late Gothic and early Renaissance art – especially Dürer and Raphael – and the widespread enthusiasm for recently rediscovered medieval sagas, age-old fairy tales, popular ballads, and folk songs. The prints of the period document important shifts in taste in contemporary art circles, including the rise to prominence of landscape, informal portraiture, and scenes of everyday life alongside the more highly-ranked academic art categories of history and religion. The exhibition and catalogue will also treat a number of important printmaking innovations, among them the introduction of new technology (lithography and steel engraving) and new methods of print distribution (print albums, illustrated books and almanacs, annual print club editions), all of which served a rapidly expanding world of print collectors made up of a newly flourishing segment of the population, the cultivated citizenry known as the Lesepublikum, or reading public.

AHIS W3816 Mapping Gothic England. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Some knowledge of medieval architecture.

In this seminar we will apply the notion of  “mapping,” or spatial databasing to a corpus of English Gothic churches and cathedrals.  We will, in addition, explore the notion of “Englishness” in architectural production of the twelfth to fifteenth centuries.

AHIS W3819 Contemporary British Art. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

TBA

AHIS W3833 Architecture, 1750-1890. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Major theorists and designs of architecture, primarily European, from the Age of Enlightenment to the dawn of the art nouveau critique of historicism. Particular attention to changing conditions of architectural practice, professionalization, and the rise of new building types, with focus on major figures, including Soufflot, Adam, Boullee, Ledoux, Schinkel, Pugin, and Garnier.

AHIS W3845 The Grand Tour. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This undergraduate seminar explores the origins and development of tourism by focusing on the eighteenth-century Grand Tour. The course will examine topics such as motion as a vehicle of aesthetic experience and the use of guidebooks and itineraries; the identification and codification of a canon of monuments and masterpieces; luxury, consumption, and the category of tourist art; copying, invention, and the role of the fragment; and the relationship between tourism, collecting, and the origin of museums.

AHIS W3849 Chichen Itza and its Sacred Well. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this seminar we will read seminal literature on Chichen Itza while analyzing its architecture and sculpture. Each student will select a major monument to work on as the class reconstructs the ancient city. It is hoped that information gleaned through the methods of art history will add to our knowledge of this complex and fascinating place. Undergraduates will have the chance to do some “pioneering” work instead of just repeating the literature.

AHIS W3854 Bernini, Baroque Sculpture, and the Painterly. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will examine afresh the painterly illusionism of Bernini’s statues as well the intermediality of his ensembles of sculpture, painting, and architecture (known as bel composti). Rather than situate materiality and facture subordinate to illusion and ideation (as is typically the case), we will consider baroque sculpture as material as much as immaterial. What might be gained if we look beyond Bernini’s dematerializing illusionism, and consider the material presence of his work? Was Bernini interested in medium specificity? In what media do we have evidence of him thinking pictorially?  Are Bernini’s processes, whether in drawing or in modeling, similar to those of painters who also drew and modeled? How does Bernini’s work and process compare to that of contemporary sculptors like Alessandro Algardi, Francesco Mochi and Giuliano Finelli, to name a few? The goal is to come away from this class with a better sense for how material and conceptual dialogues among the arts shaped Baroque sculpture.

AHIS W3865 Paris: Capital of the 19th Century. 4 points.

APPLICATION DUE TO 826 SCHERMERHORN.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A travel seminar on Paris in its nineteenth-century heyday. Painting, prints, architecture, urban planning, fashion, romance, revolutions and death will all be studied. Assignments will include novels about Paris. During spring break, the class will travel to Paris to experience the city.

AHIS W3870 Rome and Florence: A Tale of Two Cities: Architecture and urban strategies in the Renaissance. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Rome and Florence have been the two centers where the humanism and the study of antiquity started and developed. The seminar will explore differences and similarities produced in architecture and urban strategies by a different kind of patronage: the papacy in Rome and the Medici family in Florence.

AHIS W3885 Intellectuals, Gods, Kings & Fishermen. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

During the Hellenistic period (330-30 BCE), themes that were considered uninteresting, even inappropriate for the viewer of Classical and Late Classical sculpture became extremely attractive: old people, hard working peasants, old drunken prostitutes, fishermen in the big harbours, or persons ethnically different from the Greek ideals became the subject of the Hellenistic sculpture in the round that also produced images of serene divinities and dynamic members of the elite in an entirely Classical tradition. Besides Athens, new cultural and artistic centres arose: Alexandria in Egypt, Antiocheia and Pergamon in Asia Minor, or Rhodes. Despite its importance as the birthplace of all arts, Athens did not dominate anymore the artistic language, so that an unprecedented variety of styles characterises the sculptural production of the Hellenistic period. The seminar will study the sculpture of the Hellenistic period as an extremely imaginative and dynamic artistic expression without the Classical bias. The styles of the various Hellenistic artistic centres will be individually analysed based on representative works and then compared to each other and to the sculptural traditions of the Classical period, so that Hellenistic sculpture can be understood both as a continuation of the Classical and especially Late Classical sculpture and as an artistic and intellectual revolt against the ideals of the past.

AHIS W3886 Art Between the Wars 1919-1939. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Coming on the heels of the Guggenheim's recent blockbuster exhibit, "Chaos and Classicism," Art Between the Wars is a seminar dedicated to the investigation of interwar art, architecture, film and photography produced in France, Italy, Germany, and the USSR from 1919-1939. We will examine the widespread return to figuration, the rampant retour à l'ordre mentality, and the rapid replacement of the historical avant-garde movements of Cubism, Futurism, Expressionism and Suprematism (and Constructivism), with Purism, Novecento, Neue Sachlichkeit, and Soviet Socialist Realism, respectively. By way of contrast we will also consider the example of America's own homegrown interwar movement, Regionalism.

AHIS W3894 The Floating World. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: ArtHum, Preference given to students with some background in Asian Art

"Pictures of the Floating World" (Ukiyo-e) constitute one of the most significant developments in the history of Japanese art, and one that would have profound impact on the history of art in Europe and the west in the early modern period. These images were created on all pictorial formats, from scroll paintings and painted fans to woodblock prints, wooden posters, lanterns, and kites. Because these images pervaded so many different media, Ukiyo-e images offer a unique lens through which to examine the role art in early modern society as well as the very nature of that society. Our course will focus primarily on the woodblock print, a popular pictorial form that was accessible to broad sectors of society, and will focus on woodblock prints created in the city of Edo between 1700 and 1850. The course will be shaped around three approaches: brief weekly lectures to introduce prominent images and themes; discussion of readings that offer critical perspectives; and direct examination of works of art in the collections of Columbia University and other institutions and collections in New York.

AHIS W3895 Majors' Colloquium: the Literature and Methods of Art History. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Not open to Barnard or Continuing Education students. Majors must receive instructor's permission. Students must sign-up online: http://goo.gl/forms/otfh8x5hqk

Introduction to different methodological approaches to the study of art and visual culture. Majors are encouraged to take the colloquium during their junior year.

AHIS W3897 Black West: African-American Artists in the Western United States. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course considers the creative production of African Americans primarily in California in the 19th and 20th centuries. Themes pertinent to the course include: how are African-American identities and cultural production imbricated with concepts of what is considered “western” or trends of west coast artmaking?; and what can these artists tell us about notions of space, place, and migration in the African-American imagination? 

AHIS W3898 Yoruba and the Diaspora. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

We will study one of the great classical civilizations of Africa, the Yoruba kingdoms of Nigeria and Benin, and their impact on the arts of Cuba (Santería/Lucumi), Haiti (Vodoun and associated easel painting), Brazil (Candomblé, Umbanda),  Surinam, and the U.S. There will be one or more museum field trips. For their research projects, students are free to work on a variety of topics, ranging from the subjects already listed to: the representation of Santería in Hollywood; the films of Maya Deren; Cuban modernism; Zora Neale Hurston in Haiti; etc.

AHIS W3899 African American Visual and Decorative Arts, 1650-1900. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course surveys the earliest forms of visual production by North Americans of African descent, spanning the period from 1640-1900. Our focus encompasses decorative arts and crafts (furniture, wrought iron, pottery, quilts), architecture and the emerging field of African American archeology, along with photography and the fine arts of painting and sculpture. We will consider how certain traditions brought from Africa contributed to the development of the early visual and material culture of what came to be called the United States. We will also reflect on how theories of creolization, diaspora, and resistance help us understand African American and American culture in general.

AHIS W3904 Aztec Art and Sacrifice. 4 points.

SEAS Interdisciplinary Course
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar explores the issues of art and sacrfice in the Aztec empire from the points of view of the 16th century and modern times.

AHIS W3906 The Colonial View of Aztec and Inca Art. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: application required.

Aztec and Inca art and culture analyzed as seen through Spanish and Native eyes in the context of an increasingly hybrid Colonial world.

AHIS W3907 Construction of Andean Art. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Explores various ways in which the West has made sense of Andean Art from the 16th century to the present.

AHIS W3915 African Art: The Next Generation. Focus: Congo. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

African art history reached a new maturity and sophistication in the 1990s through an intense interdisciplinary dialogue on the visual arts in the Congo. Prominent historians, anthropologists, political scientists, philosophers, artists, and art historians debated the history of Congolese art and changed its future through active patronage. The seminar will cover a wide variety of these texts and will examine the unprecedented role for museum exhibitions in disseminating new interpretations for African art.

AHIS W3919 The French Renaissance 1450-1550. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Reading knowledge of French

Renaissance art in France rarely receives the same attention as its counterpart in Italy. The beginning of the French Renaissance is usually defined by the influx of Italian artists and objects during the course of the military campaigns in Italy by Charles VIII as well as Louis XII and/or the reign of Francis I (1515-1547). Suggesting a different view on the French Renaissance, this seminar aims to investigate the history of French art from Jean Fouquet (fl. c. 1450-1480) to Henry II (r. 1547-1559), emphasizing the diversity of French artistic production of this period and suggesting a continuity usually not acknowledged. A focus will be on illuminated manuscripts and painting, but the course will also address other media, such as objet d'art, stained glass, tapestries, wall painting and architecture. This class will include visits to Columbia's Rare Book & Manuscript Library, the Pierpont Morgan Library, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and The Cloisters. Reading knowledge of French is strongly recommended.

AHIS W3921 Patronage and the Monuments of India. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Exploration of the multiple aspects of patronage in Indian culture -- religious, political, economic, and cultural. Case studies focused on specific monuments will be the subject of individual lectures.

AHIS W3922 Rome, CA. 300-1300. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: basic Italian desirable; at least 2 classes in Ancient/Medieval art.

This seminar explores the art and architecture of the city of Rome from Late Antiquity through the Middle Ages, namely from the reign of Constantine the Great to the creation of the first Jubilee Year by Pope Boniface VIII in 1300. The course is offered in close collaboration with Ancient Rome and Its Monuments (F. de Angelis) and is conceived as a travel seminar, taking students to Rome during Spring Break.

AHIS W3923 The Public Monument in the Ancient Near East. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar will focus on the invention of the public monument as a commemorative genre, and the related concepts of time, memory and history in the ancient Near East and Egypt. Public monuments will be studied in conjunction with readings from ancient texts (in translation), as well as historical criticism, archaeological and art historical theories.

AHIS W3930 Ancient Rome and its Monuments. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Familiarity with Ancient Rome, to be demonstrated through courses taken (Roman Art, Roman History, Latin Literature, etc.)

This seminar is an introduction to the main monuments of ancient Rome from the Archaic period to the third century CE. A trip to Rome will take place during Spring Break.

AHIS W3944 Art and Performance in 19th Century Europe. 4 points.

This course explores how the notion of "performance" can help us conceptualize aspects of nineteenth-century visual culture. Part of our investigation will involve examining how artists and critics claimed theater, music, and dance as models for the visual arts. Additionally, we will consider the implications of recent theories of performance for an understanding of artmaking and viewing as social practices

AHIS W3947 India's Images of the Feminine. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: application required.

AHIS W3951 Expatriate, Emigre and Exile Artists, 1789-1830. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course explores the relation between the creative process and the respective conditions of expatriation, emigration and exile from the beginning of the French Revolution in 1789 until the end of the Bourbon Restoration in 1830. While all three conditions involve distance from one's home, the personal and historical factors that define them varied significantly, with corresponding differences in the way that the creative process was approached. Examining the cases of Élisabeth Vigée-Lebrun, Jacques-Louis David and Francisco de Goya among others, this course focuses on the works artists produced while away from their native land, often by constraint rather than choice. Topics of discussion include: the Grand Tour and cosmopolitanism circa 1789; the category of the émigré(e)-artist; Revolution, gender and exile; uprooting and creative paralysis/creative fury; the refashioning of artistic identity; and the relation to history and the recent past.

AHIS W3953 The Artist Reading: Illustration in the 19th Century. 4 points.

Around 1800, new printing techniques revolutionized bookmaking. This revolution included new layouts, new visual effects, as well as new levels of dissemination through higher editions and cheap mass production. Consequently, the book itself became an important field of experimentation in visual representation, and thus established a new relationship between text and image, seeing and reading. The seminar examines the technical as well as the artistic, theoretical, and social sides of nineteenth-century book making and illustration

AHIS W3956 Medieval Art at the Cloisters. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Meeting at the Cloisters, this seminar will provide the opportunity to work directly with the works of art themselves. Having introduced the works of art and located them in their present context, we will use the works as a means of passage to the principal periods and great themes of medieval art.

AHIS W3960 Cathedral: Narrating Gothic. 4 points.

Application required. See department website for instructions.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

We have created "Gothic" as much with words as with stones. With a sequence of readings in the primary sources, we will explore the relationship between building and talking, with special reference to Gothic.

AHIS W3961 Major's Colloquium: Intro to the Literature and Methods of Architectural History. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will combine practical training in visual analysis and architectural historical research -- through a single writing assignment in three stages -- with a close reading of key works of architectural historians since the emergence of the discipline as a free-standing field of inquiry in the late 19th century. In addition to course meetings occasional site visits will be arranged in the city and further a field. Majors must receive instructor's permission. Students must sign-up online: http://goo.gl/forms/otfh8x5hqk

AHIS W3963 Readings in Modernism and Modernity in Architecture. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar, based on close readings of key texts in modern and contemporary architectural theory, addresses the question of how these writings have shaped the practice of architecture and critical writing about actual buildings and urban design. Writers covered will include Wagner, Le Corbusier, Moholy-Nagy, Gropius, Venturi, and Koolhaus. The seminar will give particular attention to the relationship between the manifestoes of architects and the buildings they produced.

AHIS W3966 The Printed Image and the Invention of the Viewer. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

By the third quarter of the fifteenth century, the mechanically reproduced image could offer a variety of visual experiences: occasions for devotional encounters, markers of scientific data, portraits substituting for real presence, moral commentaries, templates for designs, and performances of stylistic bravado. Some of these categories had never before been presented for ownership, nor in the format of a single sheet that could be bought, colored, cut, pasted, written upon, copied, or sent as a greeting card. In order to attune prospective buyers to the capabilities of this medium, artists developed different strategies for signaling how their images might be enjoyed, put to use, or interpreted. Structured around visits to work with originals in New York collections, this course aims to develop our skills at “reading” prints, to understand how they invited certain behaviors and practices and offered new kinds of pictorial experiences. Through close reading of texts and close analysis of images, we will discover how early modern prints created artistic conversations and trained the eyes and minds of their viewers.

AHIS W3967 Sacred Love in Italian Renaissance Art. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

What is the nature of sacred love? How is it different from love experienced within romance, marriage, and friendship? How does one love God? What role does art play in conceptualizing divine love? How does it stimulate desire in the viewer's soul, mind, and body? Such questions structure this course's investigation of sacred love in Italian Renaissance art. The course examines religious art created between 1250-1550 within the cities of Florence, Venice, Rome, Siena, and Mantua, while simultaneously exploring the changing theological notions of love from the late medieval period through the Counter-Reformation. Topics covered within the course include the adoration of Jesus' body in the altarpiece; devotion in the context of Madonna and Child paintings; ecstatic transcendence in portrayals of saints like St. Mary Magdalene and St. Catherine of Siena; holy matrimony within the convent and monastery; as well as charity in the art of confraternities dedicated to amor dei and amor proximi.

AHIS W3971 Photographer/Ethnographer. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar explores the "creative uses of reality." Modern and contemporary artists have become increasingly concerned to represent culture—their own but especially other people's—through the media of film and photography. Are the resulting works products of art or science? Why is it so hard to tell? Has the opening of the archives through the internet and through globalization changed anything? Should artists who take on the role of cultural mediator be held to a code of ethics similar to the "human subject" protocols imposed on anthropologists? In the seminar, we will examine influential models, such as Nanook of the North and the work of Jean Rouch, in relation to developing discourses on documentary photography, anthropology, primitivism, and contemporary art. The course will also take advantage of groundbreaking scholarship on postcolonial photographic practice in India and Africa that challenges assumptions that photography is somehow an inherently "Western" medium. The seminar has been timed to take advantage of the campus visits of contemporary artists from South Africa and Brazil whose work directly confronts the politics of representation.

AHIS W3974 Painting and Photography, From Daguerre To Richter. 4 points.

Application required. See department's website for instructions.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This class will survey the major movements in painting and photography in the 19th and 20th centuries, and examine methods for understanding the often-contested relationship between the two media. The guiding thread of the class will be a critical reading of Aaron Scharf's classic text 'Art and Photography' (1968), expanding upon its strengths and commenting on its shortcomings. The class is a workshop to rethink the similarities and differences between painting and photography as means of representation.

AHIS W3982 The Shape of New York: Reconstructing Lower Manhattan. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Studies the history of Lower Manhattan, its redevelopment around the World Trade Center in the 1960s, and rebuilding in the aftermath of 9/11. Topics include the rise of the financial district, the creation of Battery Park City, public policy and the process of city building, and issues relating to a proper memorial and transportation infrastructure. Students will hear from guest speakers involved in the rebuilding effort, and participate in a pilot digital project to explore the history and future of Lower Manhattan.

AHIS W4076 Arts of Sub-Saharan African. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Survey of the arts of sub-Saharan Africa.

AHIS W4078 Art and Archaeology of West Africa. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Reviews the history of West African art from circa 500 B.C.E. through 1900 C.E., using mostly evidence from sculpture, pottery, and textiles. Also critically assesses the current state of archaeological research and its value to art historical scholarship.

AHIS W4086 Aztec Art and Architecture. 3 points.

Open to graduate and undergraduate students.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course focuses on the visual and material culture of the Aztec (Mexica) Empire, from the fourteenth to sixteenth centuries CE. We will explore the Mexica civilization through their books, objects, buildings, and festivals, investigating topics such as communication, performance, religion and ritual, sacred landscapes, histories and origin stories, politics and empire, and other facets of society. In addition, we will consider interactions of Mexica and Europeans in New Spain in the sixteenth century and the transformations in arts and culture as a result of their interchange.

AHIS W4089 Native American Art. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This introduction to Native North American art surveys traditions of painting, sculpture, ceramics, textiles, photography, and architecture, and traces the careers of contemporary Indian modernists and postmodernists. It emphasizes artistic developments as a means of preserving culture and resisting domination in response to intertribal contact, European colonization, and American expansion.

AHIS W4109 Vision and Imagination in Chinese Painting. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

   

AHIS W4110 Japanese Architecture from the mid-19th C. to the Present. 3 points.

This course will examine Japanese architecture and urban planning from the mid-19th century to the present. We will address topics such as the establishment of an architectural profession along western lines in the late 19th century, the emergence of a modernist movement in the 1920's, the use of biological metaphors and the romanticization of technology in the theories and designs of the Metabolist Group, and the shifting significance of pre-modern Japanese architectural practices for modern architects.  There will be an emphasis on the complex relationship between architectural practice and broader political and social change in Japan.

AHIS W4111 The Japanese Temple. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

No other single institution has played a more crucial role in the development and preservation of Japanese art than the Buddhist temple. This course will examine the Buddhist temple in Japan from its beginnings in the late sixth and seventh century through the early modern period. Lectures will provide students with multiple perspectives on the architecture, art, and liturgy that comprise Buddhist houses of worship in Japan. Issues to be explored include: the adoption of continental practices at Hōryūji and Tōdaiji; adaptations to the Japanese cities and landscape at Tōji, Murōji, and Sensōji; the impact of new sects such as Zen and Pure Land Buddhism in medieval Japan; and syncretism at sites such as Kumano.

AHIS W4127 Indian Painting. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

AHIS W4130 The Indian Temple. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course explores the emergence and development of the Indian temple, examines the relationship between form and function, and emphasizes the importance of considering temple sculpture and architecture together. It covers some two thousand years of activity, and while focusing on Hindu temples, also includes shrines built to the Jain and Buddhist faiths.

AHIS W4131 Medieval Art I: From Late Antiquity to the End of Byzantium. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A survey of Early Christian and Byzantine art from its origins in the eastern provinces of the Late Roman Empire through the Ottoman Conquest of Constantinople in 1453. The course is first segment of a two-part survey of medieval monuments offered by the Department of Art History and Archaeology.

AHIS W4145 Women and Self-Representation in Islamic Societies. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

AHIS W4155 Art and Archaeology of Mesopotamia. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course surveys the art and architecture of Mesopotamia from the rise of the first cities, the invention of writing, and the development of monumental art and architecture in the fourth millennium BC through the Parthian- Roman era (3rd century AD). Within this historical framework the lectures will focus on the revolutionary ancient developments in art and architecture, including the origins of narrative representation, the first emergence of historical public monuments, and sacred architecture. We will also study some ancient texts on the making and uses of images and monuments, including rituals of animating statues, building rituals, treatment of images in wars, and visual performativity. At the same time, small scale and personal arts will be considered in the context of private ownership and the practices of daily life.

AHIS W4158 The Art of Mesopotamia: 4th To 2nd Millenium B.C.E. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Introduction to ancient Near Eastern art as it developed on the background of the political and social changes from the earliest known urban civilization to territorial states.  Questions of (dis-)continuity in the visual representation of gods or political rulers and in the selection of narrative scenes on seals, reliefs, in statues and terracottas are discussed in relation to ideological, ethnical, social and economical differences.

AHIS W4181 Art and Architecture of Ancient Assyria. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Survey of the art and architecture of ancient Assyria (northern Iraq) from the Early Dynastic period (ca. 2500 B.C.E.) until the end of the Neo-Assyrian empire (612 B.C.E.).  Surviving artifacts, excavation reports, ancient written records, and specialized studies on trade, state and imperial administration, cult and temple, history, and language.

AHIS W4215 Aegean Art and Architecture. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An examination of the arts, architecture, and archaeology of the Aegean, inclusive of surrounding eastern and western Mediterranean regions, this survey includes material from the Bronze Age, with a particular focus on the visual culture of the Minoans and Mycenaeans.

AHIS W4235 Gore and Violence in Greek Art. 3 points.

Greek art is usually associated with beauty, symmetry, and formal perfection. However, both the historical context that led to the creation of artistic expressions in various media and the majority of topics Greek artists chose to depict clearly demonstrate the violent origins of Greek art. Aim of this course is to break through the frame of what is considered the canonical image of Classical antiquity and shed light on the darker aspects of Greek art. The course will try to demonstrate how art in Classical Greece was used as an effective means in both dealing and channeling violence. Nevertheless, violence in art also represented a sophisticated way to create and demolish the image of dangerous otherness: the aggressive barbarian (Persian), the uncontrolled nature outside the constraints of the polis (Centaurs), the all too powerful female (Amazons).

AHIS W4315 The Making of Medieval Art, 650-900. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The development of medieval art in the Germanic kingdoms of western Europe from the mid-7th century to the end of the Carolingian empire

AHIS W4338 Rome In the Middle Ages. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: one introductory course in medieval art.

The role of monumental art in the transformation of imperial Rome into the capital of Western Christendom between the 4th and 14th centuries.

AHIS W4353 Gothic Art.. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The range of Gothic art is studied by focussing on four units of patronage: Suger and Saint-Denis, the court of Louis IX in Paris, England in the 13th century, and 14th-century transformations of Gothic under Philip the Bold.

AHIS W4356 Gothic Painting In France, 1200-1350. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Origins and development of French Gothic painting from the Ingeborg Psalter through the works of Pucelle and his circle.

AHIS W4443 Baroque and Rococo Architecture 1600-1750. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course surveys the history of European architecture from 1600 to 1750. In addition to the analysis of key buildings, particular attention is given to developments in architectural theory, landscape design, and urban planning. Topics include the publication and circulation of architectural books, the debates between the Ancients and Moderns, the impact of court culture on spatial planning and interior design, and the rise of capital cities.

AHIS W4455 Byzantine Art From Justinian To the Palaeologan Renaissance. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The major patrons and themes in the art of the Byzantine (East Roman) empire from the 6th to 14th centuries.  Topics to be examined include the patronage of Justinian, the theology of icons, the classical system of Byzantine church decoration, the concept of renaissance in the middle Byzantine period and the question of provincial Byzantine art.

AHIS W4480 Art In the Age of Reformation. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Artistic production in Germany and the Netherlands in the 16th century and the transformation of the social function of art as a consequence of the development of reformed theories of art and the introduction of humanist culture: Albrecht Durer, Hans Baldung Grien, Hans Holbein the Younger, Albrecht Altdorfer, Quentin Massys, Lucas van Leyden, Jan Gossaert, Jan van Hemessen, and Pieter Aertsen.

AHIS W4555 American Colonial Portraiture. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This class surveys the field of American colonial portraitures, introducing the major figures in each region and analyzing their work in terms of its style and technique as well as the cultural expectations surrounding the making and viewing of the paintings. Attention will be paid to diverse material forma of portraiture, from miniatures to silhouettes, from oil paintings to engravings on individual sheets or bound into books. The class will pay particular attention to the ways in which portraiture facilitated and undermined the economic and political operations of the colonies.

AHIS W4562 European Cities and the Discourses of Urban Planning, 1750-1890. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: for undergraduates, a course in modern architecture.

The rise of modern town planning theory from the Enlightenment critiques of Voltaire, Laugier, and Pierre Patte to the reappraisal of organic city form by Camillo Sitte. In addition to ideal, the course will focus on the transformation of four European capitals: London, Paris, Berlin, and Vienna.

AHIS W4565 Flemish Painting: Bruegel To Rubens. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Starting with the various trends which can be distinguished in Flemish art in the early 16th century, traces the development of painting in Flanders to the middle of the 17th century, with special emphasis on Bruegel and Rubens.

AHIS W4567 Dutch and Flemish Painting From Bruegel To Rembrandt. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A survey of the principal painters active in the Netherlands from ca. 1560 to ca. 1670. Special attention to Bruegel, van Dyck, and Rubens; to Goltzius, Rembrandt, and Vermeer; and to the most important painters of landscape and genre.

AHIS W4575 Robert Adam and the Architecture of the Late 18th Century In Britain. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The work in architecture of Robert Adam and his brothers in the social, political, and aesthetic contexts of 18th-century England and in relation to that of their rivals and imitators, architects such as William Chambers, Henry Holland, and the Wyatts.

AHIS W4626 Tourism and the North American Landscape. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: junior or senior standing.

Examines the relationship between Ninteenth Century landscapes (paintings, photographs and illustrations) and tourism in North America. The semiotics of tourism, the tourist industry as patron/tourist as audience, and the visual implications of new forms of travel will be explored via the work of Cole, Moran, Jackson and others.

AHIS W4630 Feminist Theories and Art Practices, 1960-1990. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Self-defined feminist artists' practices since the 1960s, examined in relation to changing feminist theories: the alleged split between essentialist body-based feminism of the 1970s and the theorizing of gender in the 1980s as a cultural construction; the return to the body in the feminist art works and theory of the 1990s; feminism and radical politics; modernism and avant-garde strategies of social and political engagement.

AHIS W4631 Feminist Theory and Art Practices, 1960s - Present. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Self-defined feminist artists’ practices since the 1960s,  in relation to changing feminist theories: essentialist body-based feminism of the 1970s; the 1980s theorizing of gender as a cultural construction; the return to the body in the 1990s; the women's movement and radical politics; feminist art, modernism, postmodernism, and avant-garde strategies of engagement; the current state of art world feminism.

AHIS W4657 Russian Art 1860-1910. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An interdisciplinary course positioning art in its historical context. It treats the emergence of realism and modernism not only in terms of formal, aesthetic innovations, but also in the matrix of changing society, patronage systems, economic development, and national identities.

AHIS W4661 20th Century Russian Art. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In conjunction with the exhibition of Russian Art at the Guggenheim Museum. What happens to Western paradigms of politics and the avant-garde, realism and abstraction, modernism and postmodernism, and the art of resistant subcultures, in the Russian "East" and in the Soviet reconfiguration of artistic freedom, the art market, commodity culture and modernity itself? Examines 19th-century realist traditions, primitivism, cubism, suprematism, constructivism, photography, socialist realism, underground art, and late- and post-Soviet postmodernism.

AHIS W4703 Modern Japanese Architecture. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

AHIS W4848 Neo-Dada and Pop Art. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines the avant-garde art of the fifties and sixties, including assemblage, happenings, pop art, Fluxus, and artists' forays into film. It will examine the historical precedents of artists such as Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, Allan Kaprow, Andy Warhol, Claes Oldenburg, Carolee Schneemann and others in relation to their historical precedents, development, critical and political aspects.

AHIS W4850 Collecting. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

AHIS W4870 Minimalism and Postminimalism. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines minimalism - one of the most significant aesthetic movements - during the sixties and seventies. More than visual art, the course considers minimal sculpture, music, dance, and "structural" film; their historical precedents; their development; and their critical and political aspects. Artists include: Carl Andre, Tony Conrad, Dan Flavin, Eva Hesse, Donald Judd, Robert Morris, Anthony McCall, Yvonne Rainer, Richard Serra, and Robert Smithson.

AHIS W4900 Modern Landscape: Histories and Theories. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Survey of the histories and theories of landscape in art from the 18th to the 20th centuries, with a focus on 19th-century Europe.

Cross-Listed Courses

Art History and Archaeology

AHIS V3250 Roman Art and Architecture. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The architecture, sculpture, and painting of ancient Rome from the 2nd century B.C. to the end of the Empire in the West.

AHIS W3904 Aztec Art and Sacrifice. 4 points.

SEAS Interdisciplinary Course
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar explores the issues of art and sacrfice in the Aztec empire from the points of view of the 16th century and modern times.

Asian and Middle Eastern Cultures (Barnard)

AHUM V3342 Masterpieces of Indian Art and Architecture. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement, Discussion Section Required
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Introduction to 2000 years of art on the Indian subcontinent. The course covers the early art of Buddhism, rock-cut architecture of the Buddhists and Hindus, the development of the Hindu temple, Mughal and Rajput painting and architecture, art of the colonial period, and the emergence of the Modern.