History

http://history.barnard.edu/

204 LeFrak Center
212-854-2159
Department Administrative Assistant: Sully Rios 

Mission

History encompasses the whole of human experience, helping us understand ourselves in the context of our times and traditions through the study of times and traditions other than our own. History means not only the record of the past but also the discipline of investigating and interpreting the past. The study of history develops habits of critical thinking and effective writing, as well as it cultivates the careful analysis of various types of quantitative and qualitative evidence. It should be of value not only to undergraduates who intend to pursue advanced degrees in the field, but also to students interested in exploring the diversity and complexity of the human past, even as they hone their analytical and expository skills.

Student Learning Outcomes

Students graduating with a major in History should be able to attain the following objectives:

  • Use and evaluate primary materials through critical reading and interpretation
  • Understand the difference between primary materials and secondary materials
  • Use and evaluate secondary materials through critical reading and interpretation
  • Develop critical writing skills
  • Gain exposure to theories and methods of historical study
  • Explore in depth and gain a good acquaintance with the history of a geographic area, a period, or  a theme

Chair:  Lisa Tiersten (Professor)
Professors:  Mark C. Carnes, Deborah Coen, Joel Kaye, Dorothy Ko, Robert A. McCaughey (Janet H. Robb Chair in the Social Sciences), Jose Moya, Rosalind N. Rosenberg (Emerita), Herbert Sloan (Emeritus), Deborah Valenze, Nancy Woloch (Adjunct)
Associate Professors:  Abosede George, Nara Milanich, Premilla Nadasen, Celia Naylor, Anupama Rao, Carl Wennerlind
Assistant Professors:  Gergely Baics, Andrew Lipman

Other officers of the University offering courses in History:

Professors: Charles Armstrong, Volker Berghahn, Richard Billows, Elizabeth Blackmar, Casey Blake, Alan Brinkley, Christopher Brown, Richard Bulliet, Elisheva Carlebach, Matthew Connelly, Victoria de Grazia, Barbara Fields, Eric Foner, Carol Gluck, William Harris, Martha Howell, Kenneth Jackson, Karl Jacoby, Alice Kessler-Harris, Rashid Khalidi, Adam Kosto, William Leach, Mark Mazower, Adam McKeown, Samuel Moyn, Mae Ngai, Susan Pedersen, Pablo Piccato, Pamela Smith (acting chair), Seth Schwartz, Michael Stanislawski, Anders Stephanson, Marc Van de Mieroop
Associate Professors: Marwa Elshakry, Matthew Jones, Gregory Mann, Christine Philliou, Caterina Pizzigoni, Samuel Roberts
Assistant Professors: Manan Ahmed, Tarik Amar, Charly Coleman, Hilary-Anne Hallett, Rebecca Kobrin, Natasha Lightfoot, Marco Maiuro, Neslihan Senocak, Rhiannon Stephens, Emma Winter

Requirements for the Major

Students who intend to major in history should consult a member of the department in their sophomore year to plan their academic programs. The history major requires a minimum of eleven courses, eight in the area of concentration and three outside the area of concentration. Six of the eleven required courses must be classes taken at Barnard or Columbia.

The 11 required courses must include:

  1. Three introductory survey courses (i.e., 1000-level courses in American and European History, or their 3000-level equivalents in all other historical areas, chosen in consultation with adviser). One of these must be in the area of concentration. Students with AP credits may substitute advanced course(s) for introductory courses, although AP credits may not be counted towards the 11 required courses.
  2. Two seminars, one of which must be taken at Barnard or Columbia.
  3. The two-semester senior research seminar (HIST BC3391 Senior Research Seminar-HIST BC3392 Senior Research Seminar). The Senior Thesis must be taken in sequence over two semesters, beginning in the Fall and continuing through the Spring.
  4. Four additional courses.

Majors may, with the approval of their advisers, take two of their 11 courses outside of the department, provided that such courses are closely related to their concentrations.

Eight courses are required for a concentration.

Students may choose to focus their study of history on a region (such as Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, South Asia), period (such as ancient, medieval, early modern), or theme (thematic concentrations and sample courses are listed below).

Thematic Concentrations

Urban History
HIST BC2980World Migration3
HIST BC3327Consumer Culture in Modern Europe4
HIST BC3332The Politics of Leisure in Modern Europe4
HIST BC3360London: From Great Wen to World City4
HIST W3441Making of the Modern American Landscape3
HIST W3535History of the City of New York3
HIST BC3651Jewish Tales from Four Cities: The Immigrant Experience in New York, Buenos Aires, Paris and London4
Related courses from other departments:
ARCH V3114Making the Metropolis: Urban Design and Theories of the City since 18503
Gender, Sexuality, and the Family
HIST BC2567Women, Gender and Sexuality in the 20th Century U.S.3
HIST BC2681Women and Gender in Latin America3
HIST BC2840Topics in South Asian History3
HIST BC3323The City in Europe4
HIST BC3402Selected Topics in American Women's History4
HIST W3460Topics in the History of Women and Gender3
HIST BC3861Body Histories: The Case of Footbinding4
HIST W4103Empires and Cultures of the Early Modern Atlantic World4
HIST W4120Witchcraft and the State in Early Modern Europe3
Related courses from other departments:
WMST BC3509Gender, Knowledge and Science in Modern European History4
HSEA W4886Gender, Passions and Social Order In China Since 15003
HSEA GU4893Family in Chinese History3
Labor
HIST BC2180Merchants, Pirates, and Slaves in the Making of Atlantic Capitalism3
HIST BC3323The City in Europe4
HIST BC3332The Politics of Leisure in Modern Europe4
HIST W3528The Radical Tradition in America3
HIST W3411The Rise of American Capitalism3
Empires and Colonialism
HIST UN1020The Romans, 754 BC to 565 AD3
HIST BC1801Colonialism and Nationalism in South Asia3
HIST BC2180Merchants, Pirates, and Slaves in the Making of Atlantic Capitalism3
HIST BC2321Colonial Encounters: Europe and the Culture of Empire3
HIST BC2494Era of Independence in the Americas3
HIST BC3905Capitalism, Colonialism, and Culture: A Global History4
HIST W3020Roman Imperialism3
HIST W3220Imperial Russia, 1682-19183
HIST W3491U.S. Foreign Relations, 1890-19903
HIST W3719History of the Modern Middle East3
HIST W3764History of East Africa: Early Time to the Present3
HIST W3772West African History3
HIST W3800Gandhi's India3
HIST W4404Native American History4
Related courses from other departments:
ANTH UN3921Anticolonialism4
HSEA UN3898The Mongols in History3
Money and Markets
HIST BC2116The History of Money3
HIST BC2180Merchants, Pirates, and Slaves in the Making of Atlantic Capitalism3
HIST BC3062Medieval Economic Life and Thought ca 1000 to 15004
HIST BC3119Capitalism and Enlightenment4
HIST BC3327Consumer Culture in Modern Europe4
HIST BC3332The Politics of Leisure in Modern Europe4
HIST W3411The Rise of American Capitalism3
HIST BC3886Fashion4
HIST BC3905Capitalism, Colonialism, and Culture: A Global History4
Related courses from other departments:
ECON BC3013Economic History of the United States3
Science and Society
CSER W3222Nature and Power: Environmental History of the US0
HIST BC2305Bodies and Machines3
HIST BC3368History of the Senses4
HIST BC3903Reacting to the Past III: Science and Society4
HIST BC3909History of Environmental Thinking4
HIST BC3064Medieval Science and Society4
HIST W3103Alchemy, Magic Science3
HIST W3112The Scientific Revolution in Western Europe: 1500-17503
HIST W3441Making of the Modern American Landscape3
HIST BC3592Maritime History Since the Civil War4
HIST W4584Race, Technology, and Health4
HIST W4305The European Enlightenment4
Related courses from other departments:
WMST BC3509Gender, Knowledge and Science in Modern European History4
Nationalisms
HIST BC1801Colonialism and Nationalism in South Asia3
HIST BC3672Perspectives on Power in 20th Century Latin America4
HIST W3719History of the Modern Middle East3
HIST W3628History of the State of Israel, 1948-Present3
HIST W3800Gandhi's India3
War, Revolution, and Social Change
HIST BC2180Merchants, Pirates, and Slaves in the Making of Atlantic Capitalism3
HIST BC2494Era of Independence in the Americas3
HIST BC3323The City in Europe4
HIST W3663Mexico From Revolution To Democracy3
HIST BC3672Perspectives on Power in 20th Century Latin America4
HIST W3432The United States In the Era of Civil War and Reconstruction3
HIST W4483Military History and Policy4
HIST W4518Research Seminar: Columbia and Slavery4
HIST W4509Problems in International History4
HIST W4865Vietnam War: History, Media, Memory4
HIST W3997World War II in History and Memory3
HIST W3412Revolutionary America, 1750-18153
HIST W3491U.S. Foreign Relations, 1890-19903
Related courses from other departments:
SOCI UN3235Social Movements: Collective Action3
Rights, Citizenship, and the Law
HIST BC3423Origins of the Constitution4
HIST BC3546The Fourteenth Amendment and Its Uses4
HIST BC3672Perspectives on Power in 20th Century Latin America4
HIST W4518Research Seminar: Columbia and Slavery4
HIST W3432The United States In the Era of Civil War and Reconstruction3
HIST W4404Native American History4
HIST W3926Historical Origins of Human Rights3
HIST W4305The European Enlightenment4
HIST W4659Crime in Latin America4
Related courses from other departments:
ANTH UN3921Anticolonialism4
RELI V3650Religion and the Civil Rights Movement3
Intellectual History
HIST BC2466American Intellectual History Since 18653
HIST BC3423Origins of the Constitution4
HIST BC3546The Fourteenth Amendment and Its Uses4
HIST BC3119Capitalism and Enlightenment4
HIST BC3543Higher Learning in America4
HIST BC2457A Social History of Columbia University3
HIST BC3064Medieval Science and Society4
HIST BC3062Medieval Economic Life and Thought ca 1000 to 15004
HIST BC3324Vienna and the Birth of the Modern4
HIST BC3909History of Environmental Thinking4
HIST BC3423Origins of the Constitution4
HIST W3103Alchemy, Magic Science3
HIST W3528The Radical Tradition in America3
HIST W4305The European Enlightenment4
HIST W3926Historical Origins of Human Rights3
The Atlantic World
HIST BC2180Merchants, Pirates, and Slaves in the Making of Atlantic Capitalism3
HIST BC3592Maritime History Since the Civil War4
HIST BC2682Modern Latin American History3
HIST BC2494Era of Independence in the Americas3
HIST W4404Native American History4
Related courses from other departments:
CLEN W3930Caribbean diaspora literature (Seminar)4
ANTH V3983Ideas and Society in the Caribbean4
Premodern History
HIST W1061Introduction to the Early Middle Ages: 250-10503
HIST BC1062Introduction to Later Middle Ages: 1050-14504
HIST BC3062Medieval Economic Life and Thought ca 1000 to 15004
HIST BC2980World Migration3
HIST UN1010The Ancient Greeks 800-146 B.C.E.4
HIST UN1020The Romans, 754 BC to 565 AD3
HIST W3020Roman Imperialism3
HIST UN1002Ancient History of Mesopotamia and Asia Minor3
HIST W3660Latin American Civilization I3
Related courses from other departments:
CLCV V3162Ancient Law3
HSEA W4869History of Ancient China to the End of Han3
HSEA W3862The History of Korea to 19003
HSEA UN3898The Mongols in History3
HSME W3854East Mediterranean in the Late Bronze Age3
PHIL UN2101The History of Philosophy I: Presocratics to Augustine4
ANTH W4344Inka Empire3

Barnard history courses are numbered to reflect the type of course and world region:

By course type:
1000-level: introductory lecture courses
2000-level: other undergraduate lecture courses
3000-level: undergraduate seminars

By world region/epoch:
x000-x059: Ancient
x060-x099: Medieval
x1xx-x199: Early Modern Europe
x2xx-x299: East Central Europe
x3xx-x399: Modern Western Europe
x4xx-x599: United States
x600-x659: Jewish
x660-x699: Latin America
x700-x759: Middle East
x760-x799: Africa
x800-x859: South Asia
x860-x899: East Asia
x9xx-x999: Research, Historiography, Trans-National

Senior Research Seminar

The senior research seminar, in which students write their senior essays (30-50 pages), represents the culmination of the undergraduate history major. Students should discuss tentative topics with their advisers by the end of the junior year. Halfway through the first semester of the senior year students must submit a formal prospectus defining the problem under investigation, outlining the issues involved, and identifying the primary and secondary sources consulted. They must draft part of the essay by the end of the Fall semester, then complete their research and writing in the Spring.

Requirements for the Minor

The minor in history requires five courses, four in an area of concentration and one outside the concentration. The five courses must include one seminar. At least three of the minimum five courses must be Barnard or Columbia courses. Students planning to minor in history should consult the department chair.

HIST BC1062 Introduction to Later Middle Ages: 1050-1450. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Social environment, political, and religious institutions, and the main intellectual currents of the Latin West studied through primary sources and modern historical writings.

HIST BC1101 Introduction to European History: Renaissance to French Revolution. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Political, economic, social, religious, and intellectual history of early modern Europe, including the Renaissance, Reformation and Counter-Reformation, absolutism, Scientific Revolution, and Enlightenment.

Fall 2017: HIST BC1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1101 001/05950 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Deborah Valenze 4 62/110

HIST BC1302 Introduction to European History: French Revolution to the Present. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.

Emergence of revolutionary and counter-revolutionary mass political movements; European industrialization, nationalism, and imperialism; 20th-century world wars, the Great Depression, and Fascism.

Spring 2017: HIST BC1302
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1302 001/02084 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
304 Barnard Hall
Lisa Tiersten 4 75/95

HIST BC1401 Survey of American Civilization to the Civil War. 4 points.

The major theological and social concerns of 17th-century English colonists; the political and ideological process of defining an American; the social and economic forces that shaped a distinctive national identity; the nature of the regional conflicts that culminated in civil war.

Fall 2017: HIST BC1401
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1401 001/02245 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Herbert Sloan 4 25/60

HIST BC1402 Survey of American Civilization Since the Civil War. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Examines the major intellectual and social accommodations made by Americans to industrialization and urbanization; patterns of political thought from Reconstruction to the New Deal; selected topics on post-World War II developments.

Spring 2017: HIST BC1402
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1402 001/02332 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
405 Milbank Hall
Robert McCaughey 4 48/90

HIST BC1760 Introduction to African History: 1700-Present. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Corequisites: Students who take this course may also take Introduction to Africa Studies: Africa Past, Present, and Future.

Survey of African history from the 18th century to the contemporary period. We will explore six major themes in African History: Africa and the Making of the Atlantic World, Colonialism in Africa, the 1940s, Nationalism and Independence Movements, Post-Colonialism in Africa, and Issues in the Making of Contemporary Africa.

HIST BC1801 Colonialism and Nationalism in South Asia. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Introduction to South Asian history (17-20 c.) that explores the colonial economy and state formation; constitution of religious and cultural identities; ideologies of nationalism and communalism, caste and gender politics; visual culture; and the South Asian diaspora.

HIST BC2116 The History of Money. 3 points.

Examining the history of money and the history of ways of thinking about money. We investigate how different monetary forms developed and how they have shaped and been shaped by culture, society, and politics. Tracing money from gift-giving societies to the European Monetary Union, the focus is on early modern Europe.

HIST BC2180 Merchants, Pirates, and Slaves in the Making of Atlantic Capitalism. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

Examines how the Atlantic Ocean and its boundaries were tied together through the flow of people, goods, and ideas. Studies the cultures of the communities formed by merchants, pirates, and slaves; investigates how their interactions and frictions combined to shape the unique combination of liberty and oppression that characterizes early modern capitalism.

HIST BC2230 Central Europe: Nations, Culture, and Ideas. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The making and re-making of Central Europe as place and myth from the Enlightenment to post-Communism. Focuses on the cultural, intellectual, and political struggles of the peoples of this region to define themselves. Themes include modernization and backwardness, rationalism and censorship, nationalism and pluralism, landscape and the spatial imagination.

HIST BC2255 Democracy and Dictatorship: Italy, the Balkans, and Turkey Between the Two World Wars. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

The course examines the social, economic and political impact World War I had on the Balkans, Italy, and Turkey.  In particular, the growing influence of fascism from its birthplace in Italy to its emergence in various forms throughout the Balkans will be the central theme in the course.

HIST BC2305 Bodies and Machines. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Situates key scientific and technological innovations of the modern era in their cultural context by focusing on the interactions between bodies and machines. Through our attention to bodily experience and material culture, we will explore the ways in which science and technology have shaped and been shaped by the culture of modernity.

HIST BC2321 Colonial Encounters: Europe and the Culture of Empire. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

Examines the shaping of European cultural identity through encounters with non-European cultures from 1500 to the post-colonial era. Novels, paintings, and films will be among the sources used to examine such topics as exoticism in the Enlightenment, slavery and European capitalism, Orientalism in art, ethnographic writings on the primitive, and tourism.

HIST BC2374 France in Modern Times, 1789-Present. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Explores the history of modern France in its wider European Mediterrean and imperial contexts.  Major themes include: republicanism and rights; revolution and reaction; terror and total war; international rivalry and imperial expansion; cultural and political avant-gardes; violence and national memory; decolonialization and postcolonial migration; May '68 and temporary challenges to the republican model.

HIST BC2380 Social and Cultural History of Food in Europe. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Previous course in history strongly recommended.

Course enables students to focus on remote past and its relationship to social context and political and economic structures; students will be asked to evaluate evidence drawn from documents of the past, including tracts on diet, health, and food safety, accounts of food riots, first-hand testimonials about diet and food availability. A variety of perspectives will be explored, including those promoted by science, medicine, business, and government.

HIST BC2388 Introduction to History of Science since 1800. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

How has modern science acquired its power to explain and control the world? What are the limits of that power? Topics: the origins of scientific institutions and values; the rise of evolutionary thought and Darwin's impact; the significance of Einstein's physics; ecology and environmental politics; the dilemmas of scientific warfare.

HIST BC2401 The Politics of Crime and Policing in the US. 3 points.

This course will examine the historical development of crime and the criminal justice system in the United States since the Civil War. The course will give particular focus to the interactions between conceptions of crime, normalcy and deviance, and the broader social and political context of policy making.

HIST BC2408 Emerging Cities: 19th Century Urban History of the Americas and Europe. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Urban history of 19th century cities in Europe and the Americas. First, we study the economic, geographic, and demographic changes that produced 19th century urbanization in the Western world. Second, we examine issues of urban space: density, public health, housing conditions, spatial reforms, and the origins of the modern city planning.

Fall 2017: HIST BC2408
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2408 001/06390 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Gergely Baics 4 45/45

HIST BC2413 The United States, 1940-1975. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Emphasis on foreign policies as they pertain to the Second World War, the atomic bomb, containment, the Cold War, Korea, and Vietnam. Also considers major social and intellectual trends, including the Civil Rights movement, the counterculture, feminism, Watergate, and the recession of the 1970s.

Fall 2017: HIST BC2413
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2413 001/07891 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Mark Carnes 3 160/160

HIST BC2423 The Constitution in Historical Perspective. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Development of constitutional doctrine, 1787 to the present. The Constitution as an experiment in Republicanism; states' rights and the Civil War amendments; freedom of contract and its opponents; the emergence of civil liberties; New Deal intervention and the crisis of the Court; and the challenge of civil rights.

HIST BC2440 Intro to African American History. 4 points.

Major themes in African-American History: slave trade, slavery, resistance, segregation, the "New Negro," Civil Rights, Black Power, challenges and manifestations of the contemporary "Color Line."General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

HIST BC2457 A Social History of Columbia University. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Traces the University's history from 1754 to the present; will focus on institutional interaction with NYC, governance and finance, faculty composition and the undergraduate extra-curriculum; attention also to Columbia professional schools and Barnard College.

HIST BC2466 American Intellectual History Since 1865. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examination of the major ideas engaging American intellectuals from Appomattox to the present, with special attention to their institutional settings. Topics include Darwinism, the rise of the professoriate, intellectual progressivism, inter-war revisionism, Cold War liberalism, and neoconservatism.

HIST BC2482 Revolutionary American 1763-1815. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

How did thirteen diverse British colonies become a single boisterous but fragile new nation? Historians still disagree about the causes, motives, and meanings surrounding the founding of the United States of America. Major themes include the role of ideologies, material interests, global contexts, race, gender, and class.

HIST BC2567 Women, Gender and Sexuality in the 20th Century U.S.. 3 points.

Using an intersectional framework, this course traces changing notions of gender and sexuality in the 20th century United States.  The course examines how womanhood and feminism were shaped by class, race, ethnicity, culture, sexuality and immigration status.  We will explore how the construction of American nationalism and imperialism, as well as the development of citizenship rights, social policy, and labor organizing, were deeply influenced by the politics of gender.  Special emphasis will be placed on organizing and women's activism.

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I would also like to change the title of the course (couldn't figure out how to do this on-line) to:

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Women, Gender and Sexuality in the 20th Century

Fall 2017: HIST BC2567
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2567 001/07622 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Premilla Nadasen 3 40/40

HIST BC2570 Alma Mater: A History of American Colleges & Universities. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: NONE

The founding, growth, and present condition of American colleges and universities, with particular attention to the social history of Columbia University. Issues of governance, faculty rights and responsibilities, student activism and the public perception of institutions of higher learning will be considered.

HIST UN2661 Modern Latin American History (Latin American Civilization II). 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Explores major themes in Latin American history from the independence period to the present. It will trace economic, political, intellectual, and cultural trends. Particular attention will be given to the enduring issue of social and racial inequality and the ways that the interactions of dominant and subordinate groups have helped shape the course of Latin American history.

HIST BC2664 Reproducing Inequalities: Families in Latin American History. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Explores changing structures and meanings of family in Latin America from colonial period to present. Particular focus on enduring tensions between "prescription" and "reality" in family forms as well as the articulation of family with hierarchies of class, caste, and color in diverse Latin American societies.

HIST BC2676 Latin America: Migration, Race, and Ethnicity. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines immigrations to Latin America from Europe, Africa, and Asia and the resulting multiracial societies; and emigration from Latin America and the formation of Latino communities in the U.S., Europe, and elsewhere. Analyzes the socioeconomic and discursive-cognitive construction of ethno-racial identities and hierarchies, and current debates about immigration and citizenship.

HIST BC2681 Women and Gender in Latin America. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines the gendered roles of women and men in Latin American society from the colonial period to the present. Explores a number of themes, including the intersection of social class, race, ethnicity, and gender; the nature of patriarchy; masculinity; gender and the state; and the gendered nature of political mobilization.

HIST BC2682 Modern Latin American History. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

See W3661 Modern Latin American History (Latin American CivII). Explores major themes in Latin American history from independence to the present, with a special focus on the evolution of socio-racial inequality, political systems, and U.S.-Latin America relations. We will discuss not only "what happened" in Latin America's past, but how historians know what they know, the sources and methods they use to write history, and the theoretical frameworks they employ to interpret the past.

HIST BC2803 Gender and Empire. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines how women experienced empire and asks how their actions and activities produced critical shifts in the workings of colonial societies worldwide. Topics include sexuality, the colonial family, reproduction, race, and political activism.

HIST UN2811 South Asia: Empire and Its Aftermath. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: None.

(No prerequisite.) We begin with the rise and fall of the Mughal Empire, and examine why and how the East India Company came to rule India in the eighteenth century. As the term progresses, we will investigate the objectives of British colonial rule in India and we will explore the nature of colonial modernity. The course then turns to a discussion of anti-colonial sentiment, both in the form of outright revolt, and critiques by early nationalists. This is followed by a discussion of Gandhi, his thought and his leadership of the nationalist movement. Finally, the course explores the partition of British India in 1947, examining the long-term consequences of the process of partition for the states of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. We will focus in particular on the flowing themes: non-Western state formation; debates about whether British rule impoverished India; the structure and ideology of anti-colonial thought; identity formation and its connection to political, economic and cultural structures. The class relies extensively on primary texts, and aims to expose students to multiple historiographical perspectives for understanding South Asia's past.

Spring 2017: HIST UN2811
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2811 001/08898 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
405 Milbank Hall
Anupama Rao 4 58/103

HIST BC2840 Topics in South Asian History. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Some background in non-Western history is recommended.

Examines caste and gender as an important lens for understanding the transformations of intimate life and political culture in colonial and post-colonial India. Topics include: conjugality; popular culture violence, sex and the state; and the politics of untouchability.

HIST BC2855 Decolonization: Studies in Political Thought and Political History. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will take the historical fact of decolonization in Asia and Africa as a framework for understanding the thought of anticolonial nationalism and the political struggles that preceded it, and the trajectories of postcolonial developmentalism and the contemporary new world order.

HIST BC2865 Gender and Power in China. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

This course explores the power dynamics of gender relations in Chinese history and contemporary society. Specifically, we seek to understand how a range of women--rulers, mothers, teachers, workers, prostitutes, and activists--exercised power by utilizing available resources to overcome institutional constraints.

HIST BC2978 20th Century Cities: Americas and Europe. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: None

Urban history of 20th century cities in the Americas and Europe. Examines the modern city as ecological and production system, its form and built environment, questions of housing and segregation, uneven urban development, the fragmentation of urban society and space. Course materials draw on cities in the Americas and Europe. General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS). General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC).

HIST BC2980 World Migration. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Overview of human migration from pre-history to the present. Sessions on classical Rome; Jewish diaspora; Viking, Mongol, and Arab conquests; peopling of New World, European colonization, and African slavery; 19th-century European mass migration; Chinese and Indian diasporas; resurgence of global migration in last three decades, and current debates.

HIST BC3062 Medieval Economic Life and Thought ca 1000 to 1500. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Traces the development of economic enterprises and techniques in their cultural context: agricultural markets, industry, commercial partnerships, credit, large-scale banking, insurance, and merchant culture. Examines usury and just price theory, the scholastic analysis of price and value, and the recognition of the market as a self-regulating system, centuries before Adam Smith.

HIST BC3064 Medieval Science and Society. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

                The evolution of scientific thinking from the 12th to the 16th centuries, considering subjects such as cosmology, natural history, quantification, experimentation, the physics of motion, and Renaissance perspective.  At every point we link proto-scientific developments to social and technological developments in the society beyond the schools.

HIST BC3119 Capitalism and Enlightenment. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Traces the lively debates amongst the major European Enlightenment figures about the formation of capitalism. Was the new market society ushering in an era of wealth and civilization or was it promoting corruption and exploitation? Particular emphasis on debates about commerce, luxury, greed, poverty, empire, slavery, and liberty.

HIST BC3323 The City in Europe. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preference to upper-class students. Preregistration required.

A social history of the city in Europe from early modern times; the economic, political, and intellectual forces influencing the growth of Paris, London, Vienna, and other urban centers.

HIST BC3324 Vienna and the Birth of the Modern. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Examines Vienna from the 1860s through the 1930s as the site of intellectual, political, and aesthetic responses to the challenges of modern urban life. Through readings in politics, literature, science, and philosophy, as well as through art and music, we explore three contested elements of personal identity: nationality, sexuality, and rationality.

HIST BC3327 Consumer Culture in Modern Europe. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

The development of the modern culture of consumption, with particular attention to the formation of the woman consumer. Topics include commerce and the urban landscape, changing attitudes toward shopping and spending, feminine fashion and conspicuous consumption, and the birth of advertising. Examination of novels, fashion magazines, and advertising images.

HIST BC3332 The Politics of Leisure in Modern Europe. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Transformations in the culture of leisure from the onset of industrialization to the present day. Relations between elite and popular culture and the changing relationship between the work world and the world of leisure will be among the topics considered in such settings as the department store, the pub, the cinema, and the tourist resort.

HIST BC3360 London: From Great Wen to World City. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Social and cultural history of London from the Great Fire of 1666 to the 1960s. An examination of the changing experience of urban identity through the commercial life, public spaces, and diverse inhabitants of London. Topics include 17th-century rebuilding, immigrants and emigrants, suburbs, literary culture, war, and redevelopment.

HIST BC3368 History of the Senses. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Examination of European understandings of human senses through the production and reception of art, literature, music, food, and sensual enjoyments in Britain and France. Readings include changing theories concerning the five senses; efforts to master the passions; the rise of sensibility and feeling for others; concerts and the patronage of art; the professionalization of the senses.

HIST BC3391 Senior Research Seminar. 8 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
4 points each term.

Prerequisites: Open to Barnard College History Senior Majors.

Individual guided research and writing in history and the presentation of results in seminar and in the form of the senior essay.  See Requirements for the Major for details.  

Fall 2017: HIST BC3391
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3391 001/01944 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Lisa Tiersten 8 37

HIST BC3392 Senior Research Seminar. 4 points.

4 points each term.

Prerequisites: Open to Barnard College History Senior Majors.

Individual guided research and writing in history and the presentation of results in seminar and in the form of the senior essay.  See Requirements for the Major for details.  

HIST BC3402 Selected Topics in American Women's History. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Critical examination of recent trends in modern U.S. women's history, with particular attention to the intersection of gender, sexuality, class, and race. Topics will include: state regulation of marriage and sexuality, roots of modern feminism, altered meanings of motherhood and work, and changing views of the body.

HIST BC3403 Mexican Migration in the US. 3 points.

Examines the history of Mexican migration in the United States since the end of the XIX century. The course will analyze the role played by U.S. immigration policy, the labor demands of U.S. employers, the social and economic conditions of Mexico, and the formation of Mexican immigrant communities.

HIST BC3423 Origins of the Constitution. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

An examination of the creation of the Constitution; consequences of independence; ideological foundations; the Articles of Confederation and the Critical Period; the nationalist movement and the Convention; anti-federalism and ratification; and the Bill of Rights. Readings from selected secondary and primary sources, including The Federalist.

HIST BC3444 Freedom Dreams: Struggles for Justice in the U.S. and Beyond. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

This course will interrogate freedom as a conceptual categroy and explore how the meaning and practice of freedom has been deployed in different historical moments. We will consider how gender, race, sexuality, slavery, colonization, work and religion influenced thinking about individual and collective notions of freedom.

HIST BC3456 The Craft of Urban History. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

This seminar introduces students to the key issues and the interdisciplinary practice of modern urban history. Readings draw from the scholarly literature on 19th and 20th century cities from across Europe and the Americas. We explore economic, spatial, ethnographic, and cultural approaches to studying modern cities.

HIST BC3479 Colonial Gotham: The History of New York City, 1609-1776. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

How did a tiny Dutch outpost become a bustling colonial urban society and a major port in the British Empire? New York City's first two centuries offer more than just "pre-history" to the modern metropolis. Topics include frontier wars, slave conspiracies, religious revivals, conflicts between legitimate and contraband economies.

HIST BC3543 Higher Learning in America. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Examination of the history of American colleges and universities from the colonies to the present; special emphasis on the evolving relationship between academic institutions and the political and social orders.

HIST BC3546 The Fourteenth Amendment and Its Uses. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

The role of the 14th Amendment in shaping the modern American Constitution; theories of judicial review; the rise and fall of economic due process; the creation of civil liberties; the civil rights revolution; and the end of states' rights.

HIST BC3587 Remembering Slavery: Critiquing Modern Representations of the Peculiar Institution. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

The enslavement of people of African descent signifies a crucial historical and cultural marker not only for African-Americans but also for Americans in general. We will interrogate how and why images of slavery continue to be invoked within the American sociocultural landscape (e.g., in films, documentaries, historical novels, and science fiction).

HIST BC3592 Maritime History Since the Civil War. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and prior course in 19th - 20th century European/American History. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Critical consideration of the maritime aspects of American life and culture since the Civil War: rise of American sea power; peaking of American maritime commerce and labor; historic seaports and coastal areas as recreational resources; marine science and environmentalist concerns in shaping recent American maritime policies. Seminar will make extensive use of the web for resources and communication.

HIST BC3651 Jewish Tales from Four Cities: The Immigrant Experience in New York, Buenos Aires, Paris and London. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Examines Jewish immigrant experience in New York, Buenos Aires, London, and Paris, c.1880-1930. Focus on the Old World origins of the arrivals, the formation of neighborhoods, ethnic institutions, family, work, cultural expressions, and relations with the rest of society. Based on readings and primary research (newspapers, letters, songs, photographs, etc.).

HIST BC3666 Origin Stories: Race, Genealogy, and Citizenship. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Explores historical constructions of heredity, origins, and identity in the modern world in terms of family/genealogy; race/ethnicity; and citizenship. Drawing on evidence from diverse societies around the globe, considers how science, law, and culture define origins and how definitions have changed over time. Interdisciplinary focus ranges across history, anthropology, sociology, and cultural studies.

HIST BC3669 Inequalities:Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Latin America. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required. A general background on Latin America recommended but not absolutely required. Course limited to 15 students.

Latin America has long been characterized by extreme and enduring inequalities - of class, income, race, and ethnicity. Examines patterns of inequality from different disciplinary perspectives, both historically and in the present. Examines not only causes and solutions but how scholars have approached inequality as an intellectual problem.

HIST BC3672 Perspectives on Power in 20th Century Latin America. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Examination of recent Latin American historiography concerns with power in the context of 20th-Century Latin America. Focus on such diverse topics as the Mexican Revolution and migrant culture in Costa Rica, labor mobilization in Chile and the dirty war in Argentina. Themes include the relationship between popular culture and the state; the power of words and the power of symbols; structure and agency; the role of the law; the relationship between leaders and followers; and the intersections of gender, race, and power.

HIST BC3763 Children and Childhood in African History. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

This course focuses on the history of childhood and youth in African societies and how young people as historical agents have impacted the social histories of their communities. How did young Africans live in past times? What forces shaped understanding of their status as children or youth? How have major historical processes such as colonialism, industrialization, apartheid, and liberation, neocolonialism, and neoliberalism impacted and been impacted by children and youth in Africa? What roles have young people themselves played in the making of African histories? These questions will be explored in course readings, discussions, and students' original research projects.

HIST BC3771 Critical Perspectives on the Mobilization of Race and Ethnicity on the Continent and in the Study of Africa. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing.

Critically examines the relationship between social difference and narratives and practices of power in historical and contemporary African publics. Race and Ethnicity are the key axes of social difference that will be examined. Other axes of difference such as gender, sexuality, class, caste, generation and nationality will also be examined through points of intersection with race and ethnicity.

HIST BC3788 Gender, Sexuality, and Power from Colonial to Contemporary Africa. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

This course deals with the scholarship on gender and sexuality in African history. The central themes of the course will be changes and continuities in gender performance and the politics of gender and sexual difference within African societies, the social, political, and economic processes that have influenced gender and sexual identities, and the connections between gender, sexuality, inequality, and activism at local, national, continental, and global scales.

HIST BC3791 Lagos: From Pepper Farm to Megacity. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Examines the many Lagoses that have existed over time, in space, and in the imagination from its origins to the 21st century. This is a reading, writing, viewing, and listening intensive course. We read scholarly, policy-oriented, and popular sources on Lagos as well as screening films and audio recordings that feature Lagos in order to learn about the social, cultural, and intellectual history of this West African mega-city.

HIST BC3805 Caste, Power, and Inequality. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

                      Draws on the experiences of life and thought of caste subalterns to explore the challenges to caste exploitation and inequality.

HIST BC3830 Bombay/Mumbai and Its Urban Imaginaries. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Explores the intersections between imagining and materiality in Bombay/Mumbai from its colonial beginnings to the present. Housing, slums, neighborhoods, streets, public culture, contestation, and riots are examined through film, architecture, fiction, history and theory. It is an introduction to the city; and to the imaginative enterprise in history.

HIST BC3861 Body Histories: The Case of Footbinding. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

The deceptively small subject of footbinding provides a window into the larger family dynamics and sexual politics in Chinese history and society. Explores the multiple representations of footbinding in European travelogues, ethnographic interviews, Chinese erotic novels and prints, and the polemics of modern and feminist critiques.

HIST BC3866 Fashion in China. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course challenges the long-standing association of fashion with the West. We will trace the transformation of China's sartorial landscape from the premodern era into the present. Using textual, visual, and material sources, we will explore: historical representations of dress in China; the politics of dress; fashion and the body; women's labor; consumption and modernity; industry and the world-market. We will also read key texts in fashion studies to reflect critically on how we define fashion in different historical and cultural contexts. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, embracing history, anthropology, art, and literature. Field(s): EA

HIST BC3870 Gender and Migration: A Global Perspective. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required. Sophomore Standing.

Explores migration as a gendered process and what factors account for migratory differences by gender across place and time; including labor markets, education demographic and family structure, gender ideologies, religion, government regulations and legal status, and intrinsic aspects of the migratory flow itself.

HIST BC3879 Feminist Traditions in China. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Background in Women's Studies and/or Chinese Studies helpful, but not necessary. Sophomore standing. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Explores the intellectual, social and cultural grounds for the establishment and transmission of feminist traditions in China before the 19th century.  Topics include pre-modern Chinese views of the body, self, gender, and sex, among others.  Our goal is to rethink such cherished concepts as voice, agency, freedom, and choice that have shaped the modern feminist movement.

HIST BC3886 Fashion. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: At least one course in a Non-U.S. Area in History, Literature, Anthropology, Film Studies or Art History. Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Investigates the cultural, material and technological conditions that facilitated the development of "fashion systems" in early modern Europe, Japan and contemporary Asian diasporic communities. In the global framework, "fashion" serves as a window into the politics of self-presentation, community formation, structure of desires, and struggles over representation.

HIST BC3901 Reacting to the Past II. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20. Preregistration required. Reacting I, a First-Year seminar, is recommended.

Collision of ideas in two of the following three contexts: "Rousseau, Burke and Revolution in France, 1791;" "The Struggle for Palestine: The British, Zionists, and Palestinians in the 1930s," or "India on the Eve of Independence, 1945".

HIST BC3903 Reacting to the Past III: Science and Society. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Not offered 2008-09. \nPermission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

                     

HIST BC3904 Introduction to Historical Theory and Method. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required. Preference to JUNIOR and SOPHOMORE Majors. Fulfills General Education Requirement (GER); Historical Studies (HIS); Reason and Value

Confronts a set of problems and questions attached to the writing of good history by examining the theories and methods historians have devised to address these problems. Its practical focus: to prepare students to tackle the senior thesis and other major research projects. The reading matter for this course crosses cultures, time periods, and historical genres. Fulfills all concentrations within the history major.

Fall 2017: HIST BC3904
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3904 001/05391 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Joel Kaye 4 12

HIST BC3905 Capitalism, Colonialism, and Culture: A Global History. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

From Indian Ocean worlds of the seventeenth century, to Atlantic world slavery, to the establishment of colonies in Asia and Africa during the nineteenth century, colonization was critical to the development of metropolitan ideas regarding politics and personhood. This seminar will examine these histories, along with emerging constructions of race and gender, as precursors to debates about human rights and humanitarianism in the twentieth century.

HIST BC3907 Edible Conflicts: A History of Food. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Conflicts emerging from the production and consumption of food from prehistoric to modern times. Settled agriculture and the significance of geography and social stratification in determining food consumption; ideologies of social status and "taste" in Europe; impact of knowledge about health and hygiene on European dietary habits; drink in diets and social life; dining out in European culture; role of transport and technology in consumer culture; food and the welfare state; mass production and globalization of food.

HIST BC3909 History of Environmental Thinking. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preference to upper-class students. Preregistration required.

A consideration of how experiences of the natural world and the meaning of "nature" have changed over the past three centuries. Follows the development of the environmental sciences and the origins of environmentalism. The geographical focus will be Europe, with attention to the global context of imperialism.

HIST BC3910 Global Politics of Reproduction: Culture, Politics, and History. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Comparative, cross-cultural examination of social organization and historical construction of human reproduction, with emphasis on 20th century. Topics include role of states and local and transnational "stratification" of reproduction by race, class, and citizenship; eugenics; population politics; birth control; kinship as social and biological relationship; maternity; paternity; new reproductive technologies.

HIST BC3953 Anarchism: A Global History. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Explores the historical development of anarchism as a working-class, youth, and artistic movement in Europe, North and Latin America, the Middle East, India, Japan, and China from the 1850s to the present. Examines anarchism both as an ideology and as a set of cultural and political practices.

HIST BC3973 20th Century Cities: Americas and Europe. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Urban history of 20th century cities in the Americas and Europe. Examines the modern city as ecological and production system, its form and built environment, questions of housing and segregation, uneven urban development, the fragmentation of urban society and space. Course materials drawing on cities in the Americas and Europe.

HIST BC3999 Transnational Feminism. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Examines the theory and practice of transnational feminist activism. We will explore the ways in which race, class, culture and nationality facilitate alliances among women, reproduce hierarchical power relations, and help reconstruct gender.  The course covers a number of topics:  the African Diaspora, suffrage, labor, development policy, colonialism, trafficking, consumerism, Islam, and the criminal justice system.

HIST BC4117 Ritual, Revel and Riot: Popular Culture In Early Modern Europe. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will examine several of the seminal works that explore the nature of popular culture in early modern Europe.  There are several themes we will explore in this course

Cross-Listed Courses

History

HIST UN1010 The Ancient Greeks 800-146 B.C.E.. 4 points.

A review of the history of the Greek world from the beginnings of Greek archaic culture around 800 B.C., through the classical and hellenistic periods to the definitive Roman conquest in 146 B.C., with concentration on political history, but attention also to social and cultural developments.Field(s): ANC

Fall 2017: HIST UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1010 001/27406 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Richard Billows 4 53/90

HIST W1061 Introduction to the Early Middle Ages: 250-1050. 3 points.

This course surveys the history of the Mediterranean world and northern Europe from the Late Roman Empire to the eleventh century. We will begin (Part 1) by considering the interconnected Roman world of Late Antiquity, focusing on the changes brought about by Christianity. The second half (Part 2) will trace the emergence of new religious and political communities around the Mediterranean and in Northern Europe. Special attention will be given to the circulation of people, products and ideas across Europe and the Mediterranean and the changes that this brought about.   This course emphasizes the diverse but fragmentary textual and material evidence that survives from the period and the problems of interpreting this evidence. Students will begin acquiring the skills of a historian and learn why and how other historians have studied the period. No previous background in medieval history is required.

HIST W3026 Roman Social History. 3 points.

Social structure, class, slavery and manumission, social mobility, life expectation, status and behavior of women, Romanization, town and country, social organizations, education and literacy, philanthropy, amusements in the Roman Empire, 70 B.C. - 250 A.D. Field(s): *ANC

HIST W3231 Russia and the Soviet Union in the 20th Century. 3 points.

The course offers an introduction into the history of Russia and the Sovient Union in the twentieth century. It combines lectures and discussion sections as well as survey texts and a selection of sources, including documents generated by state/party bodies, various documents produced by individual authors (especially diaries, letters, and memoirs), and some film materials. Putting the Soviet phenomenon into its wider intellectual, cultural, and geographical contexts, we will also address questions of modernity and modernization, socialism and communism, and authoritarian practices in politics, culture, and society.   Field(s): MEU

HIST W3330 Europe: from the Nazi New Order to the European Union. 3 points.

The history of Europe in the wider world from the Allies' victorious war against the Nazi New Order to the triumph of the European Union after the collapse of Soviet Empire. Lectures bring Eastern and Western Europe into one focus, to study the impact of the Cold War, the exit from colonial empire, Europe's "Economic Miracle, the sexual revolution, Europe's slowdown after the 1970s Oil Shock, Euro-Reaganism, and the impact of globalization from the 1990s to the 2008 crisis.  Group(s): B Field(s): MEU

HIST W3333 British Empire. 4 points.

This course surveys the history of the British Empire from its early modern origins to decolonization in the twentieth century, with particular emphasis on the "long nineteenth century"-the heyday of British imperial ideology and colonial expansion. The geographical reach of the course, like the empire itself, is broad, covering parts of Africa, the Americas, the Caribbean, South Asia and Australasia. While the course will often emphasize the ideological and material motivations for expansion, conquest, and colonization, close attention will be paid to the experience of, and resistance to, the Empire as well, on the part of both settler colonists and indigenous peoples throughout the "new worlds.

HIST W3398 The Politics of Terror: The French Revolution. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

 This course examines the political culture of eighteenth-century France, from the final decades of the Bourbon monarchy to the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte. Among our primary aims will be to explore the origins of the Terror and its relationship to the Revolution as a whole. Other topics we will address include the erosion of the king's authority in the years leading up to 1789, the fall of the Bastille, the Constitutions of 1791 and 1793, civil war in the Vendée, the militarization of the Revolution, the dechristianization movement, attempts to establish a new Revolutionary calendar and civil religion, and the sweeping plans for moral regeneration led by Robespierre and his colleagues in 1793-1794. Field(s): MEU

HIST W3411 The Rise of American Capitalism. 3 points.

E-Commerce & Internet Technologies Track, Managing Emerging Technologies Track, Project Management Track, Discussion Section Required, Lab Required

Examines the social conflicts that accompanied the transformation of the United States from an agrarian republic and slave society to one of the most powerful industrial nations in the world. Particular attention will be paid to the building of new social and economic institutions and to cultural and visual representations of the nation and its people. Readings include major secondary works and primary documents. Formerly: American Society in the age of Capital, 1819-1897. Field(s): US

HIST W3412 Revolutionary America, 1750-1815. 3 points.

This course examines the cultural, political, and constitutional origins of the United States. It covers the series of revolutionary changes in politics and society between the mid-18th and early 19th centuries that took thirteen colonies out of the British Empire and turned them into an independent and expanding nation. Starting with the cultural and political glue that held the British Empire together, the course follows the political and ideological processes that broke apart and ends with the series of political struggles that shaped the identity of the US. Using a combination of primary and secondary materials relating to various walks of life and experience from shopping to constitutional debates, students will be expected to craft their own interpretations of this fundamental period of American history. Lectures will introduce students to important developments and provide a framework from them to develop their own analytical skills. Group(s): D Field(s): US

HIST W3523 History of Health Inequality in the Modern United States. 3 points.

Through assigned readings and a group research project, students will gain familiarity with a range of historical and social science problems at the intersection of ethnic/racial/sexual formations, technological networks, and health politics since the turn of the twentieth century. Topics to be examined will include, but will not be limited to, black women's health organization and care; HIV/AIDS politics, policy, and community response; "benign neglect"; urban renewal and gentrification; medical abuses and the legacy of Tuskegee; tuberculosis control; and environmental justice. There are no required qualifications for enrollment, although students will find the material more accessible if they have had previous coursework experience in United States history, pre-health professional (pre-med, pre-nursing, or pre-public health), African-American Studies, Women and Gender Studies, Ethnic Studies, or American Studies. 

HIST W1004 Ancient History of Egypt. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

A survey of the history of ancient Egypt from the first appearance of the state to the conquest of the country by Alexander of Macedon, with emphasis of the political history, but also with attention to the cultural, social, and economic developments. Group(s): A Field(s): *ANC

HIST UN1020 The Romans, 754 BC to 565 AD. 3 points.

Rome and its empire, from the beginning to late antiquity. Field(s): ANC

Spring 2017: HIST UN1020
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1020 001/68000 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
207 Mathematics Building
Nathan Pilkington 3 90/150

HIST W3302 The European Catastrophe, 1914-1945. 3 points.

The history of Europe's second Thirty Years War marked by economic crises, political turmoil, totalitarian ideologies, massive population transfers, and genocide; but also by extraordinary economic, scientific, and cultural developments. Group(s): B Field(s): MWE

HIST W3448 US History Since 1945. 3 points.

Topics include the cold War, McCarthyism, the postwar economy, suburbanization, consumer culture, Vietnam, the Civil Rights movement, and Watergate. Field(s): US

HIST W3540 History of the South. 3 points.

A survey of the history of the American South from the colonial era to the present day, with two purposes: first, to afford students an understanding of the special historical characteristics of the South and of southerners; and second, to explore what the experience of the South may teach about America as a nation. Group(s): D Field(s): US 

HIST W3566 History of American Popular Culture Through Music. 3 points.

This course examines the history of American popular culture through music and radio, beginning in the 1830s with minstrelsy, the first distinctively "American" popular culture, and ending in the 1960s with Motown.  The course acquaints students with key concepts that aim to "read" cultural production and to explore what's unique about culture primarily experienced through the ears.  It examines debates over culture's qualifiers, from popular to mass, high to low. Field(s): US

HIST W3611 Jews and Judaism in Antiquity. 3 points.

Field(s): ANC

HIST W3616 Jews and Christians in the Medieval World. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Medieval Jews and Christians defined themselves in contrast to one another. This course will examine the conditions and contradictions that emerged from competing visions and neighborly relations. It is arranged to comprehend broad themes rather than strict chronology and to engage both older and very recent scholarship on the perennial themes of tolerance and hate. Group(s): A Field(s): JWS

HIST W3661 Latin American Civilization II. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Latin American economy, society, and culture from 1810 to present. Group(s): D Field(s): LA 

HIST W3716 History of Islamic Societies. 0 points.

Focus on religions, conversion, ethnic relations, development of social institutions, and the relationship between government and religion. Field(d): ME

HIST W3618 The Modern Caribbean. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This lecture course examines the social, cultural, and political history of the islands of the Caribbean Sea and the coastal regions of Central and South America that collectively form the Caribbean region, from Amerindian settlement, through the era of European imperialism and African enslavement, to the period of socialist revolution and independence. The course will examine historical trajectories of colonialism, slavery, and labor regimes; post-emancipation experiences and migration; radical insurgencies and anti-colonial movements; and intersections of race, culture, and neocolonialism. It will also investigate the production of national, creole, and transborder indentities. Formerly listed as "The Caribbean in the 19th and 20th centuries". Field(s): LAC 

HIST W4083 Crime and Punishment in the Middle Ages. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

How a society defines crime, and how it deals with the criminals tells us a lot about the moral values, and the political and economic structure of that society, as well as its internal conflicts, superstitions, and fears. Often supposed to be a barbaric community of ignorant unruly men governed by greedy kings and popes, the medieval society in the popular culture is often an inspiration to the grotesque representations of violence and torture. Even an intellectual like Michel Foucault did not hesitate to advance a theory of medieval punishment, albeit a terribly wrong one, as one that focuses on the body and spectacle.  This course is designed to trace the origins of the modern criminal legislation and practices to the Middle Ages, some of which were jury trial, public persecution, and prisons. How did these practices come about, and under which social conditions? The focus of the course will be on violent crimes, such as murder, robbery, assault and suicide, and some particularly medieval crimes like sorcery, blasphemy and sodomy. The geographical scope will be limited to England, Italy and France. The class discussions are expected to take the form of collective brainstorming on how the political powers, social classes, cultural values, and religious beliefs affect the development of criminal legislation and institutions. Whenever possible the weekly readings will feature a fair share of medieval texts, including trial records, criminal laws, a manual for trying witches, and prison poetry. Field(s): *MED

HIST W4180 Conversion in Historical Perspective. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Boundary crossers have always challenged the way societies imagined themselves. This course explores the political, religious, economic, and social dynamics of religious conversion. The course will focus on Western (Christian and Jewish) models in the medieval and early modern periods. It will include comparative material from other societies and periods. Autobiographies, along with legal, religious and historical documents will complement the readings. Field(s): *JWS

HIST GU4223 Personality and Society in 19th-Century Russia. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

A seminar reviewing some of the major works of Russian thought, literature, and memoir literature that trace the emergence of intelligentsia ideologies in 19th- and 20th-century Russia. Focuses on discussion of specific texts and traces the adoption and influence of certain western doctrines in Russia, such as idealism, positivism, utopian socialism, Marxism, and various 20th-century currents of thought. Field(s): MEU

Spring 2017: HIST GU4223
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4223 001/11379 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
1219 International Affairs Bldg
Richard Wortman 4 7/15

HIST W4588 Substance Abuse Politics in African-American History. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Through a series of secondary- and primary-source readings and research writing assignments, students in this seminar course will explore one of the most politically controversial aspects in the history of public health in the United States as it has affected peoples of color: intoxicating substances. Course readings are primarily historical, but sociologists, anthropologists, and political scientists are also represented on the syllabus. The course's temporal focus - the twentieth century - allows us to explore the historical political and social configurations of opium, alcohol, heroin, cocaine, medical maintenance (methadone), the War on Drugs, the carceral state and hyperpolicing, harm reduction and needle/syringe exchange. This semester's principal focus will be on the origins and evolution of the set of theories, philosophies, and practices which constitute harm reduction. The International Harm Reduction Association/Harm Reduction International offers a basic, though not entirely comprehensive, definition of harm reduction in its statement, "What is Harm Reduction?" (http://www.ihra.net/what-is-harm-reduction): "Harm reduction refers to policies, programmes and practices that aim to reduce the harms associated with the use of psychoactive drugs in people unable or unwilling to stop. The defining features are the focus on the prevention of harm, rather than on the prevention of drug use itself, and the focus on people who continue to use drugs."[1] Harm reduction in many U.S. communities of color, however, has come to connote a much wider range of activity and challenges to the status quo. In this course we will explore the development of harm reduction in the United States and trace its evolution in the political and economic context race, urban neoliberalism, and no-tolerance drug war. The course will feature site visits to harm reduction organizations in New York City, guest lectures, and research/oral history analysis. This course has been approved for inclusion in both the African-American Studies and History undergraduate curricula (majors and concentrators). HIST W4588 will be open to both undergraduate and masters students. To apply, please complete the Google form at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1xaPFhQOzkl1NHnIjQIen9h41iel2hXAdhV59D5wH8AQ/viewform?usp=send_form. Questions may be directed to skroberts@columbia.edu.  

HIST W4604 Jews and the City. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators, seniors, and juniors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Over the course of the nineteenth century, millions of Jews uprooted themselves from their places of birth and moved to cities scattered throughout the world.  This mass urbanization not only created new demographic centers of world Jewry, but also fundamentally transformed Jewish political and cultural life.  In this course, we shall analyze primary source material, literary accounts as well as secondary sources as we examine the Jewish encounter with the city, and see how Jewish culture was shaped by and helped to shape urban culture.  We shall compare Jewish life in six cities spanning from Eastern Europe to the United States and consider how Jews’ concerns molded the urban economy, urban politics, and cosmopolitan culture.  We shall also consider the ways in which urbanization changed everyday Jewish life.  What impact did it have on Jewish economic and religious life?  What role did gender and class play in molding the experiences of Jews in different cities scattered throughout the world?

HIST W4670 Culture and Politics in Brazil, 1960-1989. 4 points.

This course seeks to elucidate the elective affinities between culture and politics in the activities of artists and intellectuals, especially those who opposed the military dictatorship in Brazil. The problem of the identity of the Brazilian people was essential for them. They sought alleged popular roots and wanted to overcome underdevelopment. At the time there was a revolutionary romanticism which involved the utopia of integrating intellectuals with the common man of the people, which could give life to an alternative project of society that was eventually defeated by the military dictatorship (1964-1985). Many artists and intellectuals engaged in the opposition to the regime, in spite of its efforts of modernization, which gave them good job opportunities, in a complex process that involved both dissent and integration to the established order. The lectures will analyze different conjunctures, from the years before the coup of 1964 until the end of the democratization process that was completed with the free elections of 1989. Particularly the decades of 1960 and 1970 were some of the most creative periods of Brazilian culture, including the Cinema Novo, the Teatro de Arena, the Bossa Nova and the Tropicalism. The topics will be examined in the light of concepts such as structures of feeling (Raymond Williams), field (Bourdieu), engagement (Sartre), commodity fetishism and reification (Karl Marx, G. Lukacs, Walter Benjamin, F. Jameson), society of the spectacle (Guy Debord), culture industry (Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer), revolutionary romanticism (Michael Löwy and Robert Sayre), among others. The course also introduces students to critical interpretations of society and culture produced by Brazilian and Brazilianist historians and social scientists.

HIST W4928 Comparative Slavery and Abolition in the Atlantic World. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: seminar application required. SEE UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR SECTION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT'S WEBSITE.

This seminar investigates the experiences of slavery and freedom among African-descended people living and laboring in the various parts of the Atlantic World. The course will trace critical aspects of these two major, interconnected historical phenomena with an eye to how specific cases either manifested or troubled broader trends across various slaveholding societies. The first half of the course addresses the history of slavery and the second half pertains to experiences in emancipation. However, since the abolition of slavery occurs at different moments in various areas of the Atlantic World, the course will adhere to a thematic rather than a chronological structure, in its examination of the multiple avenues to freedom available in various regions. Weekly units will approach major themes relevant to both slavery and emancipation, such as racial epistemologies among slaveowners/employers, labor regimes in slave and free societies, cultural innovations among slave and freed communities, gendered discourses and sexual relations within slave and free communities, and slaves’ and freepeople’s resistance to domination. The goal of this course is to broaden students’ comprehension of the history of slavery and freedom, and to promote an understanding of the transition from slavery to freedom in the Americas as creating both continuities and ruptures in the structure and practices of the various societies concerned. Group(s): ABCD Field(s): US/LA 

HIST W3628 History of the State of Israel, 1948-Present. 3 points.

The political, cultural, and social history of the State of Israel from its founding in 1948 to the present. Group(s): C Field(s): ME

HIST W3657 Medieval Jewish Cultures. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course will survey some of the major historical, cultural, intellectual and social developments among Jews from the fourth century CE through the fifteenth. We will study Jewish cultures from the Christianization of the Roman Empire, the age of the Talmuds, the rise of Islam, the world of the Geniza, medieval Spain, to the early modern period. We will look at a rich variety of primary texts and images, including mosaics, poems, prayers, polemics, and personal letters. Field(s): JEW/MED 

HIST W3660 Latin American Civilization I. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Latin American economy, society, and culture from pre-Columbian times to 1810. Global Core Approved Group(s): A, D Field(s): *LA 

HIST W3719 History of the Modern Middle East. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Graduate students must register for HIST G6999 version of this course.

This course will cover the history of the Middle East from the 18th century until the present, examining the region ranging from Morocco to Iran and including the Ottoman Empire. It will focus on transformations in the states of the region, external intervention, and the emergence of modern nation-states, as well as aspects of social, economic, cultural and intellectual history of the region. Field(s): ME

HIST W3772 West African History. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course offers a survey of main themes in West African history over the last millenium, with particular emphasis on the period from the mid-15th through the 20th century. Themes include the age of West African empires (Ghana, Mali, Songhay); re-alignments of economic and political energies towards the Atlantic coast; the rise and decline of the trans-Atlantic trade in slaves; the advent and demise of colonial rule; and internal displacement, migrations, and revolutions. In the latter part of the course, we will appraise the continuities and ruptures of the colonial and post-colonial eras. Group(s): C Field(s): AFR 

HIST W3902 History of the World to 1450 CE. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement, Discussion Section Required

This course presents and at the same time critiques a narrative world history from prehistoric times to 1500. The purpose of the course is to convey an understanding of how this rapidly growing field of history is being approached at three different levels: the narrative textbook level, the theoretical-conceptual level, and through discussion sections, the research level. All students are required to enroll in a weekly discussion section. Graded work for the course consists of two brief (5 page) papers based on activities in discussion sections as well as a take-home midterm and a final examination. Field(s): *ANC/ME