Spanish & Latin American Cultures

http://spanish.barnard.edu/

219 Milbank Hall
212-854 7491 (fax)
Language Program Director: Javier Pérez-Zapatero, 212-854-5421
Department Administrative Assistant: Tynisha Rue, 212-854-2597

The Department of Spanish and Latin American Cultures

The Department of Spanish and Latin American Cultures at Barnard College boasts a long tradition of excellence in undergraduate education for women. Throughout its history, it has afforded students a solid preparation in both Spanish language and the literatures and cultures of Spain, Spanish America, and the Spanish-speaking United States.

Mission

The keystone of our integrated curriculum is linguistic and intellectual continuity from the elementary language level to the most advanced literature and culture courses. Our language courses are  skill - and proficiency- oriented and provide the foundation students need for advanced study, either at Barnard or in college-level study abroad. Our upper-level courses stress the necessary historical and theoretical tools needed to understand the cultural and aesthetic production of the Hispanic world. Through our strong collaboration with interdisciplinary programs and departments at Barnard, including Comparative Literature, Africana Studies, Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies, and the Forum on Migration, as well as our teamwork with the Columbia Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures, we are ideally poised to train students for a wide range of post-graduation experiences in MA/PhD programs or in the professional sphere.

Student Learning Outcomes

Through the Major in Spanish and Latin American Cultures, students who rigorously apply themselves to their studies will be able to:

  • Use the Spanish language at the B2-C2 proficiency levels (Independent User/Proficient User), as defined by the Common European Framework of Reference (depending on initial background and ability);*
  • Identify and describe the cultures of Spain and Spanish America throughout their history, from Islamic Spain and the colonial period through the present.
  • Demonstrate specialized knowledge of selected literary and cultural works, authors and cultural producers of the Hispanic world, understood in their aesthetic, historical, and social contexts.
  • Use basic principles of literary and cultural theory to analyze and interpret a variety of texts and other cultural products.
  • Express their ideas, analyses, and interpretation through clear oral exposition and effective critical writing.
  • Conduct research in the fields of Spanish and Spanish American literature and culture, and demonstrate the results of their research and thinking in original academic essays.

Major and Minor in Spanish and Latin American Cultures

Majors and minors in this department will provide students with a solid literacy in the cultures of the Hispanic world. Literacy at the level of language instruction entails the students' ability to express themselves fluently in Spanish, both orally and in writing. Literacy at the cultural level entails an intellectual grasp of Spanish and Spanish American cultural and artistic products and the knowledge of the historical and methodological contexts in which to situate them. Students must consult with the major adviser to carefully plan their program upon major declaration. With adviser approval, courses taken abroad or at another institution can apply toward the major/minor. The Department of Spanish and Latin American Cultures addresses the Barnard senior research requirement through the writing of a substantial paper in a topic-based senior seminar; there is the possibility of further research development for some students. The Spanish and Latin American Cultures majors have been designed in conjunction with the Columbia Department of Spanish and Portuguese.  Hence, Barnard students may, always in consultation with the major adviser, move freely between the departments of both institutions in search of the courses that best fit their interests and schedules.

*

The Common European Framework of Reference defines these levels as follows:

Proficient User

C2 Can understand with ease virtually everything heard or read. Can summarise information from different spoken and written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation. Can express him/herself spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in more complex situations.

C1 Can understand a wide range of demanding, longer texts, and recognise implicit meaning. Can express him/herself fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. Can use language flexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes. Can produce clear, well-structured, detailed text on complex subjects, showing controlled use of organisational patterns, connectors and cohesive devices.

Independent User

B2 Can understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract topics, including technical discussions in his/her field of specialisation. Can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible without strain for either party. Can produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options.

Chair: Maja Horn (Associate Professor)
Professors: Alfred MacAdam, Wadda Ríos-Font (Assistant to the Chair)
Tinker Visiting Professor: Domingo Sánchez-Mesa Martínez
Associate Professors: Ronald Briggs (Major advisor, students with last names A-L)
Assistant Professors: Orlando Bentancor (Major advisor, students with last names M-Z)
Senior Associates: Jesús Suárez-García (Minor advisor, Study Abroad Advisor), Javier Pérez-Zapatero (Language Coordinator)
Associates: Isaura Arce Fernández, María Eugenia Lozano

Major in Spanish and Latin American Cultures

The Barnard major in Spanish and Latin American Cultures consists of eleven courses (minimum 33 credits). The required introductory courses are SPAN UN3300 (Advanced Language through Content), UN3349 (Hispanic Cultures I), and 3350 (Hispanic Cultures II). Beyond the introductory courses, the major requires seven upper-level elective courses-- 3000- or 4000-level offerings--and a Senior Seminar intended to be taken in the Fall of the senior year (in cases of unavoidable conflict, and by approval of the Major Adviser, students may enroll in the Spring section offered at Columbia).

NOTE: With adviser approval, courses in both the Department of Spanish and Latin American Cultures and the Columbia Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures numbered 3000 and above will count toward the majors or minors.

Eleven courses (minimum 33 points):

Three required introductory courses:
Advanced Language through Content [in Spanish]
Hispanic Cultures I: Islamic Spain through the Colonial Period
Hispanic Cultures II: Enlightenment to the Present
Select seven elective courses
Select one of the following Senior Seminars:4
Senior Seminar: Emotions in Modern Spanish Culture
Senior Seminar
Senior Seminar: Modern Cities and Global Cities

UN3300 must be taken after completion of the language requirement and before UN3349 and UN3350, which can be taken simultaneously or in inverse order. Except by approval of the Major Adviser, all three introductory courses are prerequisites for upper-level courses. In choosing their sections, Barnard students should keep in mind that some Columbia classes at these levels are taught by PhD candidates. Other sections at both Barnard and Columbia are taught by full-time Lecturers/Associates and tenured or tenure-track faculty.

Electives

A minimum of four electives must be chosen from the Departments' 3000- or 4000-level* offerings. Up to three electives may be taken outside the Departments, provided they address Hispanic topics. Courses at or beyond the intermediate level in Portuguese and Catalan may count as outside electives. Coursework completed in other departments requires the approval of the major advisor; students should therefore not wait until their senior year to find out whether courses they have taken will apply to the major. All students should seek chronological and geographic breadth in their coursework, enrolling in diverse classes on both Latin American and Iberian topics, something that is essential for those planning future graduate work in Hispanic Studies. Such students should consult especially closely with their adviser to plan their program.

*

4000-level courses, offered only at Columbia, are joint graduate-undergraduate courses.

Senior Research Project

The senior seminar may be taken either at Barnard (BC or UN3990) or at Columbia (UN3991, 3992, or 3993). It is an advanced, research-oriented course on a broad topic, in the context of which Barnard students are required to write a paper in Spanish of at least 20 pages. Since this paper counts as the Barnard Senior Research Project, students who take the seminar at Columbia must be sure they fulfill the 20-page requirement, regardless of what their particular professor requires of other students. These students must hand in the final version of their paper to the Barnard Major Advisor in addition to their Columbia professor.

Study Abroad

Up to four courses from Study Abroad may apply toward the major, some of which may count toward the introductory courses, provided they are at the same level and substantially address the same topics/skills. However, no more than five courses in total may be taken outside the Barnard/Columbia Spanish departments. Approval of specific courses is at the discretion of the Major Adviser (in consultation with the Study Abroad Adviser/Language Program Director for those at the 3300 level), taking into consideration the balance in the student's full program of study. Students should consult periodically with the Major Adviser to make sure they are making adequate progress toward the completion of all requirements.

Minor in Spanish and Latin American Cultures

The Barnard minor in Spanish and Latin American Cultures consists of six courses (minimum 18 credits). The required introductory courses are SPAN UN3300 (Advanced Language through Content); and UN3349 (Hispanic Cultures I) and 3350 (Hispanic Cultures II).  Beyond the introductory courses, the minor requires three upper-level electives (UN3349 and UN3350 do not count as such). These must be chosen from the Barnard Department of Spanish and Latin American Cultures' or Columbia Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures' 3000- or 4000-level offerings.

Six courses (minimum 18 points):

SPAN UN3300Advanced Language through Content [in Spanish]3
SPAN UN3349Hispanic Cultures I: Islamic Spain through the Colonial Period3
SPAN UN3350Hispanic Cultures II: Enlightenment to the Present3
Select three other courses at the 3000-level or above to be chosen in consultation with the major advisor

UN3300 must be taken after completion of the language requirement and before UN3349 or UN3350. Except by approval of the Minor Adviser, all three introductory courses are prerequisites for upper-level courses. In choosing their sections, Barnard students should keep in mind that some Columbia classes at these levels are taught by PhD candidates. Other sections at both Barnard and Columbia are taught by full-time Lecturers/Associates and tenured or tenure-track faculty.

A maximum of three courses taken outside the Departments (from study abroad, other departments at Barnard/Columbia, or other institutions) may apply toward the minor. Such courses will be approved by the Minor Adviser and the Study Abroad Adviser/Language Program Director (the latter of whom officially signs the approval), on the basis of their level, quality, and perceived relevance to the minor program of study. Courses in English do not count toward the minor.

Although Barnard allows students to sign up for minors through the end of their senior year, the Department encourages students to sign up as early in their career as possible, and to consult regularly with the Minor Adviser to ensure they are making adequate progress toward the completion of all requirements. 

Major in Spanish and Latin American Cultures with Specialization

For students wishing to pursue a more rigorously interdisciplinary program in the Social Sciences or the Humanities, the Department offers a major that integrates courses in Spanish and Latin American Cultures/Spanish and Portuguese with courses in another department or program chosen carefully by the student.

Fourteen courses (minimum 42 points):

SPAN UN3300Advanced Language through Content [in Spanish]3
SPAN UN3349Hispanic Cultures I: Islamic Spain through the Colonial Period3
SPAN UN3350Hispanic Cultures II: Enlightenment to the Present3
Select ten elective courses
Select one of the following Senior Seminars:4
Senior Seminar: Emotions in Modern Spanish Culture
Senior Seminar
Senior Seminar: Modern Cities and Global Cities

Coursework will include a minimum of three 3000- or 4000-level courses within the Departments but beyond the four required foundation courses, and six courses in another field of specialization, three of which should be closely related to Hispanic Studies. Students who wish to complete this rigorous interdisciplinary major will choose a specialization. Possible fields and programs include Anthropology, Africana Studies, Art History, Economics, Film, Gender Studies, History, Latino Studies, Latin American Studies, Music, Political Science, Sociology, and Urban Studies. Students should work closely with their major advisor to plan their program of study; it will be their responsibility to seek advising regarding coursework in their external specialization from appropriate sources (for example, from other departments' Chairs). Electives outside the two departments (Spanish and Latin American Cultures/Latin American and Iberian Cultures) should include basic methodological or foundation courses in the chosen field or program. In special cases and with advisor approval, students may complete some coursework in another, closely related field. In exceptional cases and again with advisor approval, students may take a Senior Seminar in their field of specialization as a seventh course outside of the Departments if they have completed enough basic courses in that field to manage the demands of an advanced seminar. In such cases, the major advisor must receive written communication from the seminar instructor indicating approval of a student's membership in the course; the seminar project must be on a Hispanic topic; and a copy of the project must be turned in to the major advisor for the student's file upon completion of the course. Students who complete the seminar in another department may also count it as the third elective course on a Hispanic topic outside of the two departments, in which case they may take a fourth 3000- or 4000-level course in Spanish and Latin American Cultures/Latin American and Iberian Cultures.

Senior Research Project

In the fall of their senior year, students must enroll in a senior seminar in which they will undertake the research and writing of a substantial paper in the field. Some students may wish, with departmental approval, to further develop their research in the spring through an independent study project with a willing faculty member. For that project, they may expand their work in the senior seminar or undertake a new assignment in consultation with the faculty member. SPAN BC3099 Independent Study may be counted as one of the courses that fulfills the major.

The senior seminar may be taken either at Barnard (BC or UN3990) or at Columbia (UN3991, 3992, or 3993). It is an advanced, research-oriented course on a broad topic, in the context of which Barnard students are required to write a paper in Spanish of at least 20 pages. Since this paper counts as the Barnard Senior Research Project, students who take the seminar at Columbia must be sure they fulfill the 20-page requirement, regardless of what their particular professor requires of other students. These students must hand in the final version of their paper to the Barnard Major Advisor in addition to their Columbia professor.

SPAN UN1101 Elementary Spanish I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: a score of 0-279 in the department's Placement Examination.

An introduction to Spanish communicative competence, with stress on basic oral interaction, reading, witting, and cultural knowledge. Principal objectives are to understand and produce commonly used sentences to satisfy immediate needs; ask and answer questions about personal details such as where we live, people we know and things we have; interact in a simple manner with people who speak clearly, slowly and are ready to cooperate; and understand simple and short written and audiovisual texts in Spanish. All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1101 001/29259 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
325 Pupin Laboratories
Amelia Bande 4 10/15
SPAN 1101 002/29050 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
412 Pupin Laboratories
Amelia Bande 4 12/15
SPAN 1101 003/60792 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
318 Hamilton Hall
Amelia Bande 4 11/15
SPAN 1101 004/72374 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
254 International Affairs Bldg
Francisco Meizoso 4 12/15
SPAN 1101 005/60433 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
254 International Affairs Bldg
Francisco Meizoso 4 10/15
SPAN 1101 006/21633 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
254 International Affairs Bldg
Francisco Meizoso 4 10/15
SPAN 1101 007/74188 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Xavier Llovet Vila 4 7/15
SPAN 1101 008/72178 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Xavier Llovet Vila 4 11/15
SPAN 1101 009/23143 T Th F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Xavier Llovet Vila 4 5/15
SPAN 1101 010/06086 M W Th 8:40am - 9:55am
225 Milbank Hall
Maria Lozano 4 12/15
SPAN 1101 011/00511 Th 10:10am - 11:25am
237 Milbank Hall
Maria Lozano 4 10/15
SPAN 1101 011/00511 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
501 Milbank Hall
Maria Lozano 4 10/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1101 001/71943 M W Th 8:40am - 9:55am
425 Pupin Laboratories
Ibai Atutxa 4 13/15
SPAN 1101 002/28847 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
401 Hamilton Hall
Rachel Stein 4 15/15
SPAN 1101 003/71132 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
424 Pupin Laboratories
Rachel Stein 4 14/15
SPAN 1101 004/19271 M W F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
425 Pupin Laboratories
Anne Freeland 4 15/15
SPAN 1101 005/68309 M W F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Anne Freeland 4 9/15
SPAN 1101 007/19461 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
412 Pupin Laboratories
Francisco Rosales-Varo 4 15/15
SPAN 1101 008/72146 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Francisco Rosales-Varo 4 13/15
SPAN 1101 010/60704 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Xavier Llovet Vila 4 12/15
SPAN 1101 011/17041 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Xavier Llovet Vila 4 15/15
SPAN 1101 012/24748 T Th F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Xavier Llovet Vila 4 13/15
SPAN 1101 013/04304 M W Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
501 Milbank Hall
Leonor Pons Coll 4 14/15
SPAN 1101 014/04913 M W Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
202 Milbank Hall
Leonor Pons Coll 4 15/15
SPAN 1101 015/09207 M W Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
325 Milbank Hall
Leonor Pons Coll 4 15/15
SPAN 1101 016/00997 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
237 Milbank Hall
Javier Perez Zapatero 4 12/15

SPAN UN1102 Elementary Spanish II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: SPAN UN1101 or a score of 280-379 in the department's Placement Examination.

An intensive introduction to Spanish language communicative competence, with stress on basic oral interaction, reading, writing and cultural knowledge as a continuation of SPAN UN1101. The principal objectives are to understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of immediate relevance; communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a direct exchange of information on familiar matters; describe in simple terms aspects of our background and personal history; understand the main point, the basic content, and the plot of filmic as well as short written texts.  All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1102 001/65417 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
313 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Jimenez-Caicedo 4 14/15
SPAN 1102 002/76397 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
313 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Jimenez-Caicedo 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 003/66361 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Jimenez-Caicedo 4 14/15
SPAN 1102 004/66675 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
313 Hamilton Hall
Lee Abraham 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 005/15575 M W F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Lee Abraham 4 11/15
SPAN 1102 006/21679 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
425 Pupin Laboratories
Irene Alonso-Aparicio 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 007/28210 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
425 Pupin Laboratories
Irene Alonso-Aparicio 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 008/26548 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
425 Pupin Laboratories
Irene Alonso-Aparicio 4 13/15
SPAN 1102 009/13118 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Jose Placido Ruiz-Campillo 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 010/19315 T Th F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Jose Placido Ruiz-Campillo 4 11/15
SPAN 1102 011/16134 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
307 Pupin Laboratories
Hector Gonzalez Alvarez 4 10/15
SPAN 1102 012/25522 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
509 Hamilton Hall
Hector Gonzalez Alvarez 4 9/15
SPAN 1102 014/07842 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
202 Milbank Hall
Leonor Pons Coll 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 015/02224 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
306 Milbank Hall
Leonor Pons Coll 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 016/06432 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
302 Milbank Hall
Leonor Pons Coll 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 017/02413 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
327 Milbank Hall
Javier Perez Zapatero 4 13/15
SPAN 1102 018/03325 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
237 Milbank Hall
Javier Perez Zapatero 4 9/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1102 001/17938 M W Th 8:40am - 9:55am
406 Hamilton Hall
Adrian Espinoza Staines 4 11/15
SPAN 1102 002/76517 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
313 Pupin Laboratories
Diana Romero 4 12/15
SPAN 1102 003/66781 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Diana Romero 4 12/15
SPAN 1102 004/20423 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
613 Hamilton Hall
Francisco Meizoso 4 11/15
SPAN 1102 005/11714 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
613 Hamilton Hall
Francisco Meizoso 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 006/19551 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Francisco Meizoso 4 15/15
SPAN 1102 007/16200 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Jose Placido Ruiz-Campillo 4 14/15
SPAN 1102 008/61089 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Jose Placido Ruiz-Campillo 4 12/15
SPAN 1102 009/26951 T Th F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Jose Placido Ruiz-Campillo 4 13/15
SPAN 1102 010/07364 M W Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
501 Milbank Hall
Maria Arce-Fernandez 4 16/15
SPAN 1102 011/00615 M W Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
225 Milbank Hall
Maria Arce-Fernandez 4 15/15

SPAN UN1120 Comprehensive Beginning Spanish. 4 points.

Prerequisites: This course is an intensive and fast-paced coverage of both SPAN UN1101 and SPAN UN1102. Students MUST meet the following REQUIREMENTS: 1. A minimum of 3 years of high school Spanish (or the equivalent) AND a score of 330 or above in the Department's Placement Examination, OR 2. fluency in a language other than English (preferably another Romance language). If you fulfill the above requirements, you do not need instructor's permission to register. HOWEVER, the instructor will additionally assess student proficiency during the Change of Program Period. Students who do not have the necessary proficiency level may not remain in this course. Replaces the sequence SPAN UN1101-SPAN UN1102. All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN1120
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1120 001/14661 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
253 International Affairs Bldg
Diana Romero 4 7/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN1120
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1120 001/17157 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
313 Pupin Laboratories
Diana Romero 4 13/15

SPAN UN2101 Intermediate Spanish I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: SPAN UN1102 or SPAN UN1120 or or a score of 380-449 in the department's Placement Examination.

An intensive course in Spanish language communicative competence, with stress on oral interaction, reading, writing, and culture as a continuation of SPAN UN1102 or SPAN UN1120. All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2101 001/23107 M W F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Nicole Basile 4 14/15
SPAN 2101 002/18463 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
402 Hamilton Hall
Juan Cadena Botero 4 13/15
SPAN 2101 003/62854 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
307 Pupin Laboratories
Iria Ameixeiras Cundins 4 14/15
SPAN 2101 004/20154 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
307 Mathematics Building
Francisco Rosales-Varo 4 14/15
SPAN 2101 005/10605 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
307 Mathematics Building
Francisco Rosales-Varo 4 15/15
SPAN 2101 006/60968 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Francisco Rosales-Varo 4 15/15
SPAN 2101 007/17046 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
222 Pupin Laboratories
Hector Gonzalez Alvarez 4 14/15
SPAN 2101 008/76965 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Dolores Barbazan Capeans 4 12/15
SPAN 2101 009/23158 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
316 Hamilton Hall
Perla Rozencvaig 4 14/15
SPAN 2101 010/09567 M W Th 10:10am - 11:25am
302 Milbank Hall
Jesus Suarez-Garcia 4 16/15
SPAN 2101 011/04230 M W Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
325 Milbank Hall
Jesus Suarez-Garcia 4 16/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2101 001/61926 M W Th 8:40am - 9:55am
424 Pupin Laboratories
Alberto Carpio Jimenez 4 14/15
SPAN 2101 002/62989 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
609 Hamilton Hall
Begona Alberdi 4 13/15
SPAN 2101 003/27993 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
253 International Affairs Bldg
Pablo Justel Vicente 4 12/15
SPAN 2101 004/24448 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
206 Casa Hispanica
Rachel Stein 4 15/15
SPAN 2101 005/26319 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
307 Pupin Laboratories
Felipe Becerra 4 11/15
SPAN 2101 006/75352 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
307 Pupin Laboratories
Jennifer Calles Izquierdo 4 15/15
SPAN 2101 007/66964 M W F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Luisina Gentile 4 7/15
SPAN 2101 008/19414 M W F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Anne Freeland 4 13/15
SPAN 2101 009/63698 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
222 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Jimenez-Caicedo 4 15/15
SPAN 2101 010/18489 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
222 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Jimenez-Caicedo 4 14/15
SPAN 2101 011/21269 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
652 Schermerhorn Hall
Dolores Barbazan Capeans 4 15/15
SPAN 2101 012/64723 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
254 International Affairs Bldg
Reyes Llopis-Garcia 4 15/15
SPAN 2101 013/19275 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
424 Pupin Laboratories
Amelia Bande 4 11/15
SPAN 2101 014/72346 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Amelia Bande 4 10/15
SPAN 2101 015/70500 T Th F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Amelia Bande 4 10/15
SPAN 2101 016/06179 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
327 Milbank Hall
Alma Mora 4 13/15
SPAN 2101 017/06409 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
327 Milbank Hall
Alma Mora 4 12/15
SPAN 2101 018/08349 M W Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
202 Milbank Hall
Jesus Suarez-Garcia 4 18/18
SPAN 2101 019/02433 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
327 Milbank Hall
Alma Mora 4 11/15

SPAN UN2102 Intermediate Spanish II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: SPAN UN2101 or a score of 450-625 in the department's Placement Examination.

An intensive course in Spanish language communicative competence, with stress on oral interaction, reading, writing and culture as a continuation of SPAN UN2101. All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2102 001/63245 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
224 Pupin Laboratories
Francisca Aguilo Mora 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 002/15781 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
222 Pupin Laboratories
Francisca Aguilo Mora 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 003/27143 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Francisca Aguilo Mora 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 004/27396 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
224 Pupin Laboratories
Sonia Montero 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 005/73750 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Sonia Montero 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 006/10836 M W F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Sonia Montero 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 007/16028 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
424 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Pablo Cominguez 4 13/15
SPAN 2102 008/22210 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
424 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Pablo Cominguez 4 13/15
SPAN 2102 009/68370 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
425 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Pablo Cominguez 4 11/15
SPAN 2102 010/73859 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
414 Pupin Laboratories
Angelina Craig-Florez 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 011/75945 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
253 Engineering Terrace
Reyes Llopis-Garcia 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 012/19570 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Reyes Llopis-Garcia 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 013/21109 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Guadalupe Ruiz-Fajardo 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 014/29712 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Guadalupe Ruiz-Fajardo 4 11/15
SPAN 2102 015/12933 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
414 Pupin Laboratories
Angelina Craig-Florez 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 016/09111 M W Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
237 Milbank Hall
Maria Arce-Fernandez 4 16/15
SPAN 2102 017/04596 M W Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
237 Milbank Hall
Maria Arce-Fernandez 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 018/06478 M W Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
237 Milbank Hall
Maria Arce-Fernandez 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 019/06384 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
327 Milbank Hall
Alma Mora 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 020/06469 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
302 Milbank Hall
Alma Mora 4 8/15
SPAN 2102 021/06662 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
307 Milbank Hall
Alma Mora 4 8/14
SPAN 2102 022/21002 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
325 Pupin Laboratories
Dolores Barbazan Capeans 4 9/15
SPAN 2102 023/21446 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Dolores Barbazan Capeans 4 7/15
SPAN 2102 024/92116 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
505 Casa Hispanica
Jose Castellanos-Pazos 4 6/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2102 001/20189 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
325 Pupin Laboratories
Sonia Montero 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 002/17383 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
325 Pupin Laboratories
Sonia Montero 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 003/62794 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Sonia Montero 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 004/28690 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
424 Pupin Laboratories
Lee Abraham 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 005/76810 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Lee Abraham 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 006/23272 M W Th 8:40am - 9:55am
412 Pupin Laboratories
Dolores Barbazan Capeans 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 007/11512 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
425 Pupin Laboratories
Angelina Craig-Florez 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 008/12790 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
224 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Pablo Cominguez 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 009/70644 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
224 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Pablo Cominguez 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 010/17403 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
412 Pupin Laboratories
Dolores Barbazan Capeans 4 14/15
SPAN 2102 011/69082 T Th F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Guadalupe Ruiz-Fajardo 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 012/12066 T Th F 5:40pm - 6:55pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Guadalupe Ruiz-Fajardo 4 15/15
SPAN 2102 013/05504 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
237 Milbank Hall
Maria Lozano 4 16/16
SPAN 2102 014/04596 T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
237 Milbank Hall
Maria Lozano 4 15/16

SPAN UN2108 Spanish for Spanish-Speaking Students. 4 points.

Prerequisites: heritage knowledge of Spanish. Students intending to register for this course must take the department's on-line Placement Examination. You should take this course if your recommended placement on this test is SPAN UN2102 (a score of 450-624). If you place below SPAN UN2102 you should follow the placement recommendation received with your test results. If you place above SPAN UN2102, you should choose between SPAN UN3300 and SPAN UN4900. If in doubt, please consult with the Director of the Language Programs.

Designed for native and non-native Spanish-speaking students who have oral fluency beyond the intermediate level but have had no formal language training.

Fall 2017: SPAN UN2108
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2108 001/05777 M W Th 10:10am - 11:25am
307 Milbank Hall
Jesus Suarez-Garcia 4 17/17
SPAN 2108 002/05317 M W Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
307 Milbank Hall
Jesus Suarez-Garcia 4 16/16

SPAN UN2120 Comprehensive Intermediate Spanish. 4 points.

Prerequisites: This course is an intensive and fast-paced coverage of both SPAN UN2101 and SPAN UN2102. Students MUST demonstrate a strong foundation in Spanish and meet the following REQUIREMENTS: a score ABOVE 480 on the Department's Placement Examination; or A- or higher in SPAN UN1120. If you fulfill the above requirements, you do not need the instructor's permission to register. HOWEVER, the instructor will additionally assess student proficiency during the Change of Program Period. Students who do not have the necessary proficiency level may not remain in this course. Replaces the sequence SPAN UN2101-SPAN UN2102. All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN2120
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2120 001/64121 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Perla Rozencvaig 4 10/15
SPAN 2120 002/66261 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
318 Hamilton Hall
Perla Rozencvaig 4 9/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN2120
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2120 001/11487 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
644 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Perla Rozencvaig 4 14/15
SPAN 2120 002/65400 T Th F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Perla Rozencvaig 4 10/15

SPAN UN3265 Latin American Literature in Translation. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Study of contemporary Latin American narrative; its origins and apotheosis. Readings include Machado de Assis, Borges, Garcia Marquez, Puig, and others.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN3265
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3265 001/07881 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
207 Milbank Hall
Alfred Mac Adam 3 37/60

SPAN UN3300 Advanced Language through Content [in Spanish]. 3 points.

Prerequisites: SPAN UN2102 or AP score of 4 or 5; or SAT score.

An intensive exposure to advanced points of Spanish grammar and structure through written and oral practice, along with an introduction to the basic principles of academic composition in Spanish. Each section is based on the exploration of an ample theme that serves as the organizing principle for the work done in class (Please consult the Directory of Classes for the topic of each section.) This course is required for the major and the concentration in Hispanic Studies. Formerly SPAN W3200 and SPAN BC3004. If you have taken either of these courses before you cannot take SPAN UN3300. All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN3300
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3300 001/10302 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Omar Duran-Garcia 3 14/15
SPAN 3300 002/60921 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Anayvelyse Allen-Mossman 3 5/15
SPAN 3300 003/63012 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
325 Pupin Laboratories
Alexandra Mendez 3 4/15
SPAN 3300 004/64695 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
222 Pupin Laboratories
David Mejia 3 14/15
SPAN 3300 005/69636 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Guadalupe Ruiz-Fajardo 3 6/15
SPAN 3300 006/73948 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
307 Pupin Laboratories
Reyes Llopis-Garcia 3 11/15
SPAN 3300 007/75900 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Analia Lavin 3 7/15
SPAN 3300 008/04348 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
203 Diana Center
Jesus Suarez-Garcia 3 8/15
SPAN 3300 009/01614 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
324 Milbank Hall
Javier Perez Zapatero 3 15/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN3300
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3300 001/75268 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
206 Casa Hispanica
Iria Ameixeiras Cundins 3 14/15
SPAN 3300 002/23740 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Juan Cadena Botero 3 6/15
SPAN 3300 003/74728 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
502 Northwest Corner
Nicole Basile 3 12/15
SPAN 3300 004/25538 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
222 Pupin Laboratories
Juan Jimenez-Caicedo 3 10/15
SPAN 3300 005/62928 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
425 Pupin Laboratories
Angelina Craig-Florez 3 9/15
SPAN 3300 006/77473 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
313 Pupin Laboratories
Francisco Rosales-Varo 3 14/15
SPAN 3300 007/26708 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
325 Pupin Laboratories
Perla Rozencvaig 3 12/15
SPAN 3300 009/04772 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
225 Milbank Hall
Maria Arce-Fernandez 3 14/15

SPAN UN3450 Short Fiction in Latin America. 4 points.

In this course we will discuss the theory and practice of short fiction by the leading exponents of the genre in Spanish America. Authors to be discussed may include: Horacio Quiroga, Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, Juan Rulfo, José Donoso, Rosario Castellanos, Augusto Monterroso, Rosario Ferré, Gabriel García Márquez, Angélica Gorodischer, Roberto Bolaño, and Andrea Maturana.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN3450
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3450 001/97597 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
201 Casa Hispanica
Gustavo Perez-Firmat 4 12/15

SPAN UN3349 Hispanic Cultures I: Islamic Spain through the Colonial Period. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: L" course: enrollment limited to 15 students. Completion of language requirement, third-year language sequence (W3300).

Provides students with an overview of the cultural history of the Hispanic world, from eighth-century Islamic and Christian Spain and the pre-Hispanic Americas through the late Middle Ages and Early Modern period until about 1700, covering texts and cultural artifacts from both Spain and the Americas.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN3349
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3349 001/16918 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
505 Casa Hispanica
Miguel Ibanez Aristondo 3 9/15
SPAN 3349 002/19427 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
206 Casa Hispanica
David Colmenares Gonzalez 3 10/15
SPAN 3349 003/16973 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
425 Pupin Laboratories
Roberto Valdovinos 3 9/15
SPAN 3349 004/00142 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
307 Milbank Hall
Orlando Bentancor 3 14/15
SPAN 3349 005/92100 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Noel Blanco Mourelle 3 11/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN3349
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3349 001/20198 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
201 Casa Hispanica
Daniella Wurst 3 15/15
SPAN 3349 002/20843 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
201 Casa Hispanica
Mariana-Cecilia Velazquez Perez 3 13/15
SPAN 3349 003/64698 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
505 Casa Hispanica
Alexandra Mendez 3 15/15
SPAN 3349 005/09462 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
203 Diana Center
Ana Mendez-Oliver 3 10/15

SPAN UN3350 Hispanic Cultures II: Enlightenment to the Present. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course surveys cultural production of Spain and Spanish America from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries. Students will acquire the knowledge needed for the study of the cultural manifestations of the Hispanic world in the context of modernity. Among the issues and events studied will be the Enlightenment as ideology and practice, the Napoleonic invasion of Spain, the wars of Spanish American independence, the fin-de-siècle and the cultural avant-gardes, the wars and revolutions of the twentieth century (Spanish Civil War, the Mexican and Cuban revolutions), neoliberalism, globalization, and the Hispanic presence in the United States. The goal of the course is to study some key moments of this trajectory through the analysis of representative texts, documents, and works of art. Class discussions will seek to situate the works studied within the political and cultural currents and debates of the time. All primary materials, class discussion, and assignments are in Spanish. This course is required for the major and the concentration in Hispanic Studies.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN3350
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3350 001/73673 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
505 Casa Hispanica
Santiago Acosta 3 14/15
SPAN 3350 002/29441 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Almudena Marin-Cobos 3 6/15
SPAN 3350 003/16534 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
505 Casa Hispanica
Alejandro QUINTERO MARCHER 3 14/15
SPAN 3350 004/65676 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
201 Casa Hispanica
Marta Ferrer 3 12/15
SPAN 3350 005/04777 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
324 Milbank Hall
Ronald Briggs 3 3/15
SPAN 3350 007/61291 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
201 Casa Hispanica
Agnese Codebo 3 10/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN3350
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3350 001/67165 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
505 Casa Hispanica
Anayvelyse Allen-Mossman 3 7/15
SPAN 3350 002/75252 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Omar Duran-Garcia 3 9/15
SPAN 3350 003/73379 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
201 Casa Hispanica
David Mejia 3 11/15
SPAN 3350 004/23165 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
201 Casa Hispanica
Gustavo Perez-Firmat 3 18/20
SPAN 3350 005/74557 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
201 Casa Hispanica
Analia Lavin 3 15/15

SPAN UN3558 LATIN AMERICAN FILM. 3 points.

This course aims to give students an introductory overview of some of the most salient issues surrounding contemporary Latin American film since the late 1960s. Starting with a selection of films from the experimental “new cinema” or “third cinema” of the 1960s, we will also study the contemporary production of international blockbuster movies in the 2000s, in Argentina, Brazil, Cuba and Mexico. Topics to be covered include the relationship between cinema and underdevelopment; cinema and revolution; cinema and emancipation; documentary film and fiction; gender and sexuality; neoliberalism and the market; spectatorship and subjectivity.

SPAN BC3099 Independent Study. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350.

Enables students to pursue subjects not covered by courses currently taught. To arrange this course, a student must present a member of the faculty with a program of study and obtain an Independent Study form. This form (and the program of study) must be approved both by the sponsoring faculty member and the chair of the department. The form must then be submitted to the Committee on Programs and Academic Standing for final approval. No faculty member of any rank may direct more than one BC3099 in any given semester.

SPAN BC3148 Contra Franco Vivamos mejor? Literature and Popular Culture of the Spanish Dictatorship (1936-75). 3 points.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

Examination of the literature and culture produced in Spain during the dictatorship of Francisco Franco: the interaction between culture allowed and sponsored by the regime, and the voices of resistance against repression and censorship.

SPAN BC3151 Spanish Film: Cinematic Representation of Spain. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

Examination of Spanish film in both theoretical and historical terms. Considers political and ideological changes through the 20th century and their repercussions in cinematic representation. Topics include: surrealism and Bunuel's legacy; representations of Franco and the civil war; censorship and self-censorship; gender, sexualities, and national identities; film, literature relations.

SPAN BC3170 The Films of Luis Buñuel and the Spanish Literary Tradition. 3 points.

Prerequisites: At least one 300-level course in Spanish.
A journey through the works of the renowned Spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel and the literary movements from which he drew inspiration. We will establish a dialogue between his films and Spanish artistic trends such as surrealism, the picaresque, esperpento, and realism. Authors include García Lorca, Valle Inclán, Pérez Galdós. [In Spanish]

SPAN BC3264 The Boom: The Spanish American Novel, 1962-70. 3 points.

The writing that catapulted Latin America into the mainstream of world culture: Fuentes, Garcia Marquez, Manuel Puig, Julio Cortazar, Jose Donoso, and Mario Vargas Llosa.

SPAN BC3267 Transatlantic Travel Writing in Translation. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

Since Columbus's diary the relationship between Europe and the New World has been fraught with the illusion and disappointment raised by European expectations. This course will read the Atlantic in both directions, listening to European travelers who go west and Spanish Americans who journey east to a new Old World.

SPAN BC3361 Jorge Luis Borges in Context. 3 points.

BC: Partial Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Language (LAN)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Prerequisites: Language requirement, SPAN3300 and either SPAN3349 or 3350

This course locates the life and writing of the seminal Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges in national and international historical and literary contexts.

SPAN BC3375 Literary Translation. 3 points.

BC: Partial Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Language (LAN)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Prerequisites: Language requirement SPAN330 and SPAN3349 or 3350

This course seeks to explore the techniques and skills required for the translation of literary text from Spanish to English.

SPAN BC3382 Languages in Contact: Sociolinguistic Aspects of U. S. Spanish. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

Sociolinguistics studies the connections between language and social categories such as class, gender, and ethnicity. This course will address how social, geographic, cultural, and economic factors affect the different usages of Spanish among its millions of speakers.  Through theory and practice of various research tools including Ethnography of Communication and Discourse Analysis, students with explore topics such as English-Spanish contact in the US, code-switching, and Spanglish, as well as issues of identity, bilingualism, and endangered languages.

Spring 2017: SPAN BC3382
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3382 001/03665 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
501 Milbank Hall
Maria Lozano 3 16/15

SPAN BC3435 Language and Revolution. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

Kant's Enlightenment motto, sapere aude, took on political significance for Spanish American revolutionaries who made their case in prose, pushing against the constraints of the essay. This course traces the genre's evolution from the transatlantic debate over political independence to the exuberant declarations of intellectual independence that would follow.

SPAN BC3440 Marriage and Adultery in 19th-Century Spanish Fiction. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

Consideration of the conflicting interests of 19th-century society as represented through the themes of marriage and adultery: the desire for social stability vs. the potentially subversive drive for freedom and self-affirmation. The roles of women, class, culture, and religion emphasized in works by Galdos, Clarin, Caballero, and others.

SPAN BC3441 Angels and Seagulls: the Cultural Construction of Womanhood in Nineteenth Century Spain. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

Reading of 19th-Century Spanish journalistic, medical, and legal texts, conduct manuals, and novels by both men and women, to assess how they come together in configuring new ideas of female identity and its social domains, as aristocratic rule is gradually being replaced by a new bourgeois order.

SPAN BC3442 The Bourgeois Imagination in Nineteenth-Century Spain. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

Through both literary and popular print culture, examination of the new class in 19th century Spain produced by economic industrialization and political liberalism and how it ensured its hegemony. Negotiates its foundational issues - power, money, law, city life, education, aesthetics, virtue, marriage, sexuality, and style.

SPAN BC3443 Catalan Culture, from Regionalism to Nationalism (1886-1936). 3 points.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

In the nineteenth century, the failure of the Spanish State to find political alternatives to centralism, coupled with Catalonia's industrial and economic takeoff, led to the development of a strong regionalist sentiment, and eventually a nationalist movement. From this period and through the beginning of the Spanish Civil War, intellectuals became engaged in the creation of a cultural repertoire to ground and strengthen the claim to a Catalan nationality. In this course, we will examine both the burgeoning literature in dialogue with Spanish and European currents, and the establishment of other national traditions in the fields of art, language, music, urban planning/architecture, and sport.

SPAN BC3446 Venezuela: Robbery and Nature. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

This course will read Venezuela backwards in films, poems, novels and essays, from the present-tense struggle over the legacy of chavismo to the early days of independence.  The constant thread will be the conflict between development and nature with special attention to natural resources and eco-critical approaches.

SPAN BC3449 Memory and Violence: Film and Literature of Spanish Civil War. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

Contemporary Spanish films serve as a point of departure for the study of the Civil War and Franco periods as both historical fact and myth. Includes an analysis of its representation in memoirs and literary works and its significance in light of Spain recent political transformation.

SPAN BC3455 Empire and Technology in the Colonial World. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

Exploration of the scientific and technological practices through which the Spanish Empire established and legitimated itself during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Chronicles and travel literature will show how knowledges such as cartography, metallurgy, and botany grounded technological expansion and its deployment of indigenous peoples and resources.

SPAN BC3456 Puerto Rico From Spanish Province to U.S Commonwealth: Colonial Experiences. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

This course analyzes how political conflicts and cultural attitudes emerged in Puerto Rico throughout colonial Spanish rule (1492-1898) reappear or influence developing thought after the transfer of sovereignty to the United States and through the 1952 creation of the Commonwealth, as manifested in legal, journalistic, literary, and other cultural works.

SPAN BC3457 Literatures of the Hispanophone Caribbean. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

Study of works from the Spanish-speaking islands of the Caribbean, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico, in order to unravel the cultural traits, historical patterns, and politicoeconomic realities that these islands may or may not have in common.

Spring 2017: SPAN BC3457
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3457 001/09809 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
407 Barnard Hall
Maja Horn 4 15/15

SPAN BC3466 Rock Music and Literature in the Southern Cone. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

In this course we will explore different social and cultural aspects of the shifting and complex interrelations between rock and literature in the Southern Cone.  We will examine some representative novels, short stories, documentaries, secondary bibliography, and songs in the field.

SPAN BC3467 Literature of the Southern Cone: The Dialects of Fantasy and Reality. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350.

Examination of the literature of the Southern Cone: Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, and Chile; the tension between fantastic literature and literary realism. Readings include Borges, Casares, Ocampo, Onetti, Donoso, and Roa Bastos.

SPAN BC3468 Literature of the Andes: Revolution and Identity. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350.

The region of the Andes (Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia, Peru, and Chile) has produced great poets - Mistral, Neruda, and Vallejo - as well as extraordinary novelists, Donoso and Vargas Llosa. This course seeks to identify the essential traits of the region's literature and relate them to its tumultuous history.

SPAN BC3469 Pan-Americanism. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

Explores the rich tradition of essays, poems, novels and films that define themselves with or against the notion of a shared American reality. Authors include Borges, Sarmiento, Mary Peabody Mann, Soledad Acosta de Samper and Marie Arana. Taught in Spanish.

SPAN BC3470 Latin(o) American Art in New York City: Critical Interventions, Institutions, and Creative Lives. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

Considers the trajectory and intervention of Latin(o) American art in New York City's artistic landscape. We will map the relation between Latin(o) American art and key art institutions, study critical receptions, and look at some of the lives and works of Latin(o) American artists in NYC. 

SPAN BC3471 Mexico: From Barroco to Narco: Culture and Power in Mexico. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

The course surveys Mexican literature and culture from the 17th to the 21st century. It seeks to identify the voices that define Mexico over the centuries, beginning with Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz in Colonial New Spain and ending with Elmer Mendoza in the drug-cartel ridden Culiacán of our own days, Readings include poetry, essays, and novels, including such authors as Octavio Paz, Juan Rulfo, and Carlos Fuentes.

SPAN BC3475 Fictional Foundations: Puerto Rico and the Spanish Empire, 1808-1898. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

Throughout the nineteenth century, Puerto Ricans were developing a sense of nationality, without an accompanying movement to achieve independence from Spain. This course examines this apparent contradiction, the hybrid sense of their own identity and nature that it generates among individuals who feel both Spanish and Puerto Rican, and its manifestation in literature and other cultural texts.

SPAN BC3476 Twentieth-Century Puerto Rican Literature. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

A study of Puerto Rican authors (Ferre, Sanchez, Pedreira, Julia de Burgos, Gonzalez, Marques) and their interpretation of socio-historical development in Puerto Rico. The relationship of these texts to historical writing (e.g., Quintero Rivera), and the revisionist trend in Puerto Rican historiography.

SPAN BC3479 La Novela del Boom, 1962 - 1970. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

Close reading of the novels that place Spanish America in the mainstream of worldwide literary production during the sixties. Authors include: Fuentes, Cortazar, Cabrera Infante, Vargas Llosa, Puig, and Donoso.

SPAN BC3480 Love and Eroticism in Contemporary Latin American Literature. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350.

Introduction to the artistic manifestations of love and eroticism and their relationship to social attitudes. Works by Gabriela Mistral, Vicente Huidobro, Neruda, Paz, Borges, Isabel Allende, Vargas Llosa, and Garcia Marquez.

SPAN BC3481 Contemporary Latin American Short Fiction. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

Readings of short stories and novellas by established and emerging writers from Spanish America and Brazil. Defines the parameters of Latin American short fiction by exploring its various manifestations, fantastic literature, protest writing, satire, and realism. Among the authors to be studied will be: Machado de Assis, Borges, Garcia Marquez, Ana Lydia Vega, Clarice Lispector, Silvina Ocampo, and Jose Donoso.

SPAN BC3482 Film-Literature Relations in Modern Latin American Narrative. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

Intertextual relations between film and literature. Authors and film makers include: Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Laura Esquivel, Borges, Maria Luisa Bemberg, Vargas Llosa, and Fina Torres.

SPAN BC3510 Gender and Sexuality in Latin American Cultures. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

Examines constructions of gender and sexuality in Latin American cultures. Through a close analysis of critical, literary, and visual texts, we explore contemporary notions of gender and sexuality, the socio-cultural processes that have historically shaped these, and some theoretical frameworks through which they have been understood.

SPAN BC3671 Spanish Literature from 1975: The Postmodern Discourse. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

Close reading of some of the most significant works and trends of post-Franco Spain in the light of postmodern theories. Readings will include works by Martin-Gaite, Vazquez Montalban, Montserrat Roig, Lourdes Ortiz, J.J. Millas, Ana Rosetti, Paloma Pedrero, Antonio Gala, Almudena Grandes.

SPAN BC3990 Senior Seminar: Emotions in Modern Spanish Culture. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Prerequisites: Course intended to be taken by all Spanish majors during the fall of their senior year. Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

The Spanish transition from the Ancien Régime to modernity (constitutional government and citizenship, a new class system, changing conceptions of gender and race) involved both the appearance of historically new emotions (beginning with patriotic and romantic love) and the establishment of emotional regimes that regulated allowable and forbidden feelings and practices. We will explore this process through a combination of readings in affect theory and examples of nineteenth-century print culture (literature, journalism, political speech, etc.). Seniors will write papers about related problematics in the context of the cultural production of Spain, from the nineteenth century to the present.

Fall 2017: SPAN BC3990
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3990 001/08091 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
306 Milbank Hall
Wadda Rios-Font 3 12/15

SPAN UN3991 Senior Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Seniors (major or concentrator status).

SENIOR SEMINAR

,

Section 001 - "Iberian Globalization"

,

A seminar based on a great variety of primary sources and theoretical texts that help to rethink, from the vantage point of the early modern period, the most unexpected sides of a process today called "globalization."

,

Section 002 - "Emotions in Modern Spanish Culture"

,

The Spanish transition to modernity (in politics, class relations, social roles) involved both the appearance of historically new emotions and the establishment of emotional regimes regulating feelings and practices. We will explore this process through readings in affect theory and nineteenth-century print culture (literary and nonliterary). Seniors will write about related problematics in the cultural production of 19th-21st century Spain.

Spring 2017: SPAN UN3991
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3991 001/74705 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Alberto Medina 4 4/15
Fall 2017: SPAN UN3991
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3991 001/63989 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Alessandra Russo 4 8/15

There are currently no cross-listed courses in this department.