Adjunct Lecturers: Skye Cleary; Sylvie Honig

Faculty Advisory Committee: Belinda Archibong (Economics), Alexander Cooley (Political Science), Alan Dye (Economics), Margaret Ellsberg (English), Ross Hamilton (English and Film Studies), Brian Mailloux (Environmental Science), Robert McCaughey (History), Debra Minkoff (Sociology), Rae Silver (Natural and Physical Sciences), Joan Snitzer (Art History and Visual Art), David Weiman (Economics), and Page West (Anthropology) 

Requirements

  1. Women and Leadership Course (ACLS BC3450 Women and Leadership): Students ideally take this class their sophomore or junior year.
  2. Athena Senior Leadership Seminar (ACLS BC3997 Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar/ACLS BC3998 Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar): Student can take this course either the Fall or Spring semester of their senior year; a main component of this class is the completion of a social action project which demonstrates leadership skills in an off-campus setting. 
  3. Three Electives Courses: Students choose three elective courses from Athena’s multi-disciplinary course offerings. Electives expose students to the interdisciplinary nature of leadership, the history and culture of women and leadership within society and organizations, and leadership skills.  Elective courses may also be counted as credit toward one's major. The complete listing of approved courses is below.
    • Please note: To fulfill one elective requirement, students may identify another course that fulfills the outlined learning objectives and petition the Director of Student Programs for approval using the appropriate Special Dispensation Form. Approval can be obtained before or after the course is taken. There is no guarantee the course will be approved in either case.
  4. Practicum: Students must partake in an approved practicum during the school year or summer.  A student’s practicum should relate to their post-undergraduate goals, including academic research for a professor, supervised laboratory work, and/or an internship.   Practicums in all fields are welcome, and should uphold the leadership developmental goals of the Athena Center.  Students submit a written reflection in the Senior Leadership Seminar.
  5. Athena Leadership Lab Workshops: Students must complete six workshops of their choosing. (Please note: Students who joined the Scholars program prior to Fall 2017 only need to complete 3 leadership lab workshops.)  For workshop selection, see Athena Leadership Lab.

Approved Elective Courses

Africana Studies
AFRS BC3055Slave Resistance in the United States from the Colonial Era to the Civil War
AFRS BC3121Black Women in America
AFRS BC3134Unheard Voices: African Women's Literature
AFRS BC3589Black Feminism(s)/Womanism(s)
Anthropology
ANTH UN3465Women and Gender Politics in the Muslim World
Art History
AHIS BC3123Woman and Art
AHIS BC39571980s Feminism and Postmodernism in the Visual Arts
Chemistry
CHEM BC2900Research Methods Seminar
CHEM BC3328Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Committee on Global Thought
CGTH UN3401Seminar in Global Thought: Inquiries into an Interconnected World
CGTH UN3402Topics in Global Thought: Global 20-Youth in an Interconnected World (CGTH)
Computer Science
COMS W1007Honors Introduction to Computer Science
COMS W3410Computers and Society
COMS W4170User Interface Design
Dance
DNCE BC2563Dance Composition: Form
DNCE BC2564Dance Composition: Content
DNCE BC2570Dance in New York City
DNCE BC3560Screendance: Composition for the Camera & Composition of the Camera
DNCE BC3565Composition: Collaboration and the Creative Process
DNCE BC3577Performing the Political: Embodying Change in American Performance
DNCE BC3583Gender and Historical Memory in American Dance of the 1930's to the Early 1960's
DNCE BC3980Performing the Political: Embodying Change in American Performance
Economics
ECON BC2010The Economics of Gender
ECON BC2075Logic and Limits of Economic Justice
ECON BC3011Inequality and Poverty
ECON BC3014Entrepreneurship
ECON BC3017Economics of Business Organization
ECON BC3019Labor Economics
ECON BC3029Empirical Development Economics
ECON BC3031Economics of Life
Education
EDUC BC3032Contemporary Issues in Education
EDUC BC3044Education and Social Change in Comparative Global Contexts
EDUC BC3050Science in the City
EDUC BC3058Science in the City II: Preparing Future Scientists Now
English
ENGL BC3101The Writer's Process: A Seminar in the Teaching of Writing
ENGL BC3105Fiction and Personal Narrative
ENGL BC3121Public Speaking
ENGL BC3123Rhetorical Choices: the Theory and Practice of Public Speaking
ENGL BC3196Home to Harlem: Literature of the Harlem Renaissance
ENGL BC3911Senior Seminar: Write to Vote
English Theatre
ENTH BC3140Women and Theatre
ENTH BC3144Black Theatre
Environmental Science
EESC BC3019Energy Resources
EESC BC3300Workshop in Sustainable Development (FILM)
Film
FILM BC3200Film Production
FILM BC3702Women Filmmakers
History
HIST BC2500Poverty, Race, and Gender
HIST BC2567Women, Gender and Sexuality in the 20th Century U.S.
HIST BC2664Reproducing Inequalities: Families in Latin American History
HIST BC2681Women and Gender in Latin America
HIST BC2803Gender and Empire
HIST BC2865Gender and Power in China
HIST BC3323The City in Europe
HIST BC3491Making Barnard History: The Research Process
HIST BC3549A History of Violence: Bloodshed and Power in Early America
HIST BC3870Gender and Migration: A Global Perspective
HIST BC3879Feminist Traditions in China
HIST BC3901Reacting to the Past II
HIST BC3999Transnational Feminism
HIST GU4217Women as Cold War Weapons
HIST UN2523History of Health Inequality in the Modern United States
History-East Asian
HSEA W4888Woman and Gender in Korean History
Human Rights
HRTS BC1025Human Rights in Theory and Practice
HRTS UN3001Introduction to Human Rights
Music
MUSI BC3139Introduction to Vocal Repertoire: Technique in Singing and Performance
MUSI BC3140Vocal Repertoire, Technique and Expression
MUSI V3462Music, Gender and Performance
Philosophy
PHIL UN2110Philosophy and Feminism
Political Science
POLS BC3200American Political Development, 1789-1980
POLS BC3254First Amendment Values
POLS BC3300* Colloquium on Political Participation and Democracy
POLS BC3331* Colloquium on American Political Decisionmaking
POLS BC3332* Colloquium on Exploring Political Leadership in the U.S.
POLS BC3402The Comparative Politics of Gender Inequality
POLS BC3410*Colloquium on Human Rights in a Diverse World
POLS BC3445Colloquium on Gender and Public Policy
POLS BC3507*Colloquium on Gender, Politics, and Markets
POLS BC3521Civil Rights and Civil Liberties
POLS BC3805*Colloquium on International Organization
POLS V3240Race, Law, and American Politics
POLS V3313American Urban Politics
POLS V3615Globalization and International Politics
POLS V3675Russia and the West
POLS W4316The American Presidency
Psychology
PSYC BC2137Social Psychology Laboratory
PSYC BC2138Social Psychology
PSYC BC2151Organizational Psychology
PSYC BC3153Psychology and Women
PSYC BC3166Social Conflict
PSYC BC3364Psychology of Leadership
PSYC BC3379Psychology of Stereotyping and Prejudice
Religion
RELI V3650Religion and the Civil Rights Movement
RELI W4610Science, Nature, and Religion in 20th Century America
RELI W4670Native American Religions
RELI W4721Religion and Social Justice
Science and Public Policy
SCPP BC3335Environmental Leadership, Ethics & Action
Sociology
SOCI BC3903Work and Culture
SOCI BC3907Communities and Social Change
SOCI BC3909Ethnic Conflict and Unrest
SOCI BC3913Inequalities: Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in U.S. Law and Society
SOCI BC3935Gender and Organizations
SOCI W2400Comparative Perspectives on Inequality
SOCI UN3235Social Movements
SOCI UN3264The Changing American Family
SOCI V3220Masculinity: A Sociological View
SOCI V3318The Sociology of Sexuality
SOCI V3324Poverty, Inequality, and Policy: A Sociological Perspective
SOCI UN3265Sociology of Work and Gender
SOCI UN3936Sociology and the Public
Spanish
SPAN BC3510Gender and Sexuality in Latin American Cultures
Theatre
THTR UN2005Acting Workshop
THTR UN3140Performing Women
Urban Studies
URBS UN3530Urban Development: A Rubik's Cube of Policy Choices
URBS V3550Community Building and Economic Development
URBS V3920Social Entrepreneurship
Women's Studies
WMST BC3131Women and Science
WMST UN1001Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
WMST UN3915Gender and Power in Transnational Perspective
WMST V3312Theorizing Activism (Anthropology)
WMST W4301Early Jewish Women Immigrant Writers: 1900-1939
WMST W4303Gender, Globalization, and Empire
WMST W4304Gender and HIV/AIDS
WMST W4307Sexuality and the Law
WMST W4308Sexuality and Science
WMST W4309Sex, Gender and Transgender Queries
WMST W4320Queer Theories and Histories

ACLS BC3450 Women and Leadership. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Limited to 15.

  Examination of the social conditions and linguistic practices that have shaped the historical and contemporary gendering of leadership, power, and authority in the United States and around the world. Through examples drawn from the social, political, and economic worlds, we will explore leadership in varying racial, class, and regional contexts.

Spring 2019: ACLS BC3450
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ACLS 3450 001/04851 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
404 Milstein Center
Sylvie Honig, Sarit Abramowicz 4 13/20
ACLS 3450 002/06901 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
404 Milstein Center
Sylvie Honig, Sarit Abramowicz 4 18/20
Fall 2019: ACLS BC3450
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ACLS 3450 001/06710 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
404 Milstein Center
Sylvie Honig, Sarit Abramowicz 4 12/21
ACLS 3450 002/06711 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
404 Milstein Center
Sylvie Honig, Sarit Abramowicz 4 14/21

ACLS BC3997 Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: ACLS BC3450. Enrollment limited to Barnard seniors participating in the Athena Scholars Program.

Limited to seniors participating in the Athena Scholars Program.   Students will develop a social action project where they must demonstrate leadership skills in an off-campus setting.  Students will be expected to develop and implement a detailed plan to start their project.  Then they will collaborate with other class members to advance their projects, report to their peers on their accomplishments and have an opportunity to work closely with organizations across the city on their efforts. 

Fall 2019: ACLS BC3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ACLS 3997 001/06712 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
404 Milstein Center
Skye Cleary, Sarit Abramowicz 4 18/21
ACLS 3997 002/06713 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
404 Milstein Center
Sylvie Honig, Sarit Abramowicz 4 9/21

ACLS BC3998 Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: ACLS BC3450. Enrollment limited to Barnard seniors participating in the Athena Scholars Program

Limited to seniors participating in the Athena Scholars Program. Students will develop a social action project where they must demonstrate leadership skills in an off-campus setting. Students will be expected to develop and implement a detailed plan to start their project. Then they will collaborate with other class members to advance their projects, report to their peers on their accomplishments and have an opportunity to work closely with organizations across the city on their efforts.

Spring 2019: ACLS BC3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ACLS 3998 001/09746 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
404 Milstein Center
Skye Cleary, Sarit Abramowicz 4 19/21

Cross-Listed Courses

Africana Studies (Barnard)

AFRS BC3055 Slave Resistance in the United States from the Colonial Era to the Civil War. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Analyzes the multifaceted nature of slave resistance, its portrayal and theorization by scholars.  Critically examines the various pathways of resistance of enslaved Africans and African-Americans, both individually and collectively (e.g., running away, non-cooperation, theft, arson, as well as verbal and physical confrontation, revolts and insurrections).  Considers how gender shaped acts of resistance.

AFRS BC3121 Black Women in America. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: Students must attend first day of class and admission will be decided then. Priority will be given to CCIS students (Africana Studies, American Studies and Women's Studies majors; minors in Race and Ethnic Studies). Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Examines the roles of black women in the U.S. as thinkers, activists and creators during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Focusing on the intellectual work, social activism and cultural expression of African American women, we examine how they understood their lives, resisted oppression and struggled to change society. We will also discuss theoretical frameworks (such as "double jeopardy," or "intersectionality") developed for the study of black women. The seminar will encourage students to pay particular attention to the diversity of black women and critical issues facing Black women today. This course is the same as WMST BC3121.

AFRS BC3134 Unheard Voices: African Women's Literature. 4 points.

How does one talk of women in Africa without thinking of Africa as a 'mythic unity'? We will consider the political, racial, social and other contexts in which African women write and are written about in the context of their located lives in Africa and in the African Diaspora.

AFRS BC3589 Black Feminism(s)/Womanism(s). 4 points.

Black Feminism(s)/Womanism(s)

Spring 2019: AFRS BC3589
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AFRS 3589 001/00343 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
405 Barnard Hall
Celia Naylor 4 18/18

Anthropology (Barnard)

ANTH UN3465 Women and Gender Politics in the Muslim World. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Practices like veiling that are central to Western images of women and Islam are also contested issues throughout the Muslim world. Examines debates about Islam and gender and explores the interplay of cultural, political, and economic factors in shaping women's lives in the Muslim world, from the Middle East to Southeast Asia.

Art History (Barnard)

AHIS BC3123 Woman and Art. 3 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Discussion of the methods necessary to analyze visual images of women in their historical, racial, and class contexts, and to understand the status of women as producers, patrons, and audiences of art and architecture.

AHIS BC3957 1980s Feminism and Postmodernism in the Visual Arts. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: AHIS BC1001 - AHIS BC1002 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 15 students. Permission of the instructor. Preference to seniors and Art History majors.

Examination of art and criticism that is informed by feminist and postmodern ideas about subjectivity in visual representation which first achieved prominence in the late 1970s and 1980s, exerting a profound influence on contemporary aesthetic practice. Explored in relation to earlier concepts of feminism, modernism, social art history, and "art as institution." Artworks discussed include those of Barbara Kruger, Cindy Sherman, Louise Lawler, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Hans Haacke, Mary Kelly, and Catherine Opie, among others.

Chemistry

CHEM BC2900 Research Methods Seminar. 1 point.

Instructor's Permission Required

Prerequisites: Students must be sophomores with a strong interest in pursuing research in the biological or chemical sciences

Skills to facilitate into biology and chemistry research. Students will learn to think and work like scientists and to identify, apply for and gain entry to research lab groups. Focus on writing and oral presentation skills. Additional readings and discussions on laboratory safety, women in science, and scientific ethics.

Spring 2019: CHEM BC2900
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHEM 2900 001/01159 W 2:10pm - 3:00pm
308 Diana Center
Meenakshi Rao 1 4/12

CHEM BC3328 Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory. 2.5 points.

Prerequisites: (CHEM BC2001) General Chemistry I with lab.
Corequisites: CHEM BC3230

Basic techniques of experimental organic chemistry. Principles and methods of separation, purification, and characterization of organic compounds. Selected organic reactions.

Spring 2019: CHEM BC3328
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHEM 3328 001/08102 M 1:10pm - 5:30pm
716 Altschul Hall
Meenakshi Rao, Jacob Alexander, Jean Vadakkan 2.5 19/19
CHEM 3328 002/01558 T 1:10pm - 5:30pm
716 Altschul Hall
Meenakshi Rao, Jean Vadakkan, Richard Denton 2.5 23/22
CHEM 3328 003/09361 W 1:10pm - 5:30pm
716 Altschul Hall
Meenakshi Rao, Grace Lee, Jean Vadakkan, Richard Denton 2.5 21/21
CHEM 3328 004/07771 Th 1:10pm - 5:30pm
716 Altschul Hall
Meenakshi Rao, Jacob Alexander, Jean Vadakkan 2.5 22/22
CHEM 3328 005/06219 F 1:10pm - 5:30pm
716 Altschul Hall
Meenakshi Rao, Jean Vadakkan, Michael Campbell, Richard Denton 2.5 22/21
CHEM 3328 007/07831 Th 8:00am - 12:20pm
716 Altschul Hall
Meenakshi Rao, Jean Vadakkan, Craig Allen 2.5 19/20

Committee on Global Thought

CGTH UN3401 Seminar in Global Thought: Inquiries into an Interconnected World. 4 points.

This course on global thought will consider the ways in which we think about, debate, and give meaning to the interconnected world in which we live.  In thematically focused collaborative teams, students will examine how the flows of people, things and ideas across national borders both connect our world and create uneven consequences within and among communities.   We will locate ourselves in these processes, suggesting we need go no further than our closets, tables, and street corners to consider the meanings of globalization and our roles in the world today. This course has been approved to partially satisfy the Global Core requirement.

Fall 2019: CGTH UN3401
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CGTH 3401 001/20363 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
963 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Laura Neitzel 4 25/28

CGTH UN3402 Topics in Global Thought: Global 20-Youth in an Interconnected World. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

What does it mean to be 20 years old in our rapidly changing, interconnected world? There are more youth (aged 15-25) in the world today than at any other time in history, with the majority living in the developing world.  They approach adulthood as the world confronts seismic shifts in the geopolitical order, in the nature and future of work, and in the ways we connect with each other, express identity, engage politically, and create communities of meaning. What unique challenges and opportunities confront young people after decades of neoliberal globalization? What issues are most pressing in developing nations experiencing a “youth bulge” and how do they compare to developed nations with rapidly aging populations? How do young people envision their futures and the future of the world they are inheriting? This course will examine recent scholarship while engaging the young people in the class to define the agenda and questions of the course, and to conduct their own research. This course is part of the Global Core curriculum.


“Global 20” complements a new research project of the Committee on Global Thought, “Youth in a Changing World,” which investigates from the perspective of diverse participants and of young people themselves, the most pressing issues confronting young people in the changing world today.   The course will serve as an undergraduate “lab” for the project, and among other involvements, students in the course will help conceive, plan, and take part in a NYC-wide “Youth Think-In” sponsored by the CGT during the Spring 2018 semester. Within the course, students will become “regional experts” and examine the primary themes of the class through the prism of specific areas or nations of their choosing. A final class project includes a “design session” that will consider how universities might better train and empower youth to confront the challenges and embrace the opportunities of our interconnected world of the 21stcentury.

Spring 2019: CGTH UN3402
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CGTH 3402 001/70102 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
201a Philosophy Hall
Laura Neitzel 4 28/28

Computer Science

COMS W1007 Honors Introduction to Computer Science. 3 points.

Lect: 3.

Prerequisites: AP Computer Science with a grade of 4 or 5 or similar experience.

An honors-level introduction to computer science, intended primarily for students considering a major in computer science. Computer science as a science of abstraction. Creating models for reasoning about and solving problems. The basic elements of computers and computer programs. Implementing abstractions using data structures and algorithms. Taught in Java. 

Fall 2019: COMS W1007
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
COMS 1007 001/35951 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
633 Seeley W. Mudd Building
John Kender 3 32/70

COMS W3410 Computers and Society. 3 points.

Lect: 3.

Broader impact of computers. Social networks and privacy. Employment, intellectual property, and the media. Science and engineering ethics. Suitable for nonmajors.

Fall 2019: COMS W3410
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
COMS 3410 001/35915 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
1024 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Ronald Baecker 3 50/60

COMS W4170 User Interface Design. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Prerequisites: (COMS W3134 or COMS W3136 or COMS W3137)

Introduction to the theory and practice of computer user interface design, emphasizing the software design of graphical user interfaces. Topics include basic interaction devices and techniques, human factors, interaction styles, dialogue design, and software infrastructure. Design and programming projects are required.

Spring 2019: COMS W4170
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
COMS 4170 001/14347 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
451 Computer Science Bldg
Lydia Chilton 3 107/100
Fall 2019: COMS W4170
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
COMS 4170 001/35953 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
1024 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Brian Smith 3 77/75

Dance (Barnard)

DNCE BC2563 Dance Composition: Form. 3 points.

The study of choreography as a creative art. The development and organization of movement materials according to formal principles of composition in solo and duet forms. Applicable to all styles of dance.

Spring 2019: DNCE BC2563
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
DNCE 2563 001/08349 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
11 Barnard Hall
Gabri Christa 3 21/25

DNCE BC2564 Dance Composition: Content. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Continued study of choreography as a communicative performing art form. Focuses on the exploration of ideas and meaning. Emphasis is placed on the development of personal style as an expressive medium and unity of style in each work. Group as well as solo compositions will be assigned.

Fall 2019: DNCE BC2564
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
DNCE 2564 001/07687 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
305 Barnard Hall
Colleen Thomas 3 24/20

DNCE BC2570 Dance in New York City. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Study of the cultural roots and historical contexts of specific communities using New York City's dance scene as a laboratory. Students observe the social environments in which various modes of dance works are created while researching the history of dance in New York City. Course includes attendance at weekly events, lecture-demonstrations, and performances.

Spring 2019: DNCE BC2570
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
DNCE 2570 001/03542 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
409 Barnard Hall
Siobhan Burke 3 30/30
Fall 2019: DNCE BC2570
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
DNCE 2570 001/07689 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
409 Barnard Hall
Elisa Davis 3 27/35
DNCE 2570 002/07699 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
504 Diana Center
Marjorie Folkman 3 32/35

DNCE BC3560 Screendance: Composition for the Camera & Composition of the Camera. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Must have taken a Dance Department Composition course, have some dance training.

This experiential, hands-on course requires all students to choreograph, dance, and film. Focusing on single-shot film-making, the duet of the camera and the dance will create an understanding of the interaction between the two, enabling students to create a final short film.

Fall 2019: DNCE BC3560
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
DNCE 3560 001/07668 T Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
Ll020 Milstein Center
Gabri Christa 3 12/12

DNCE BC3565 Composition: Collaboration and the Creative Process. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Dance Composition: Form (DNCE BC 2563) or Dance Composition: Content (DNCE BC 2564), or permission of the instructor.

This course is a study in dance composition with a focus on collaboration.  Whether creating a solo or larger group piece, students are encouraged to collaborate with other artists. Methods employed by contemporary choreographers will be explored.  Peer feedback and creative dialogue will be a component of every class.

Spring 2019: DNCE BC3565
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
DNCE 3565 001/01174 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
305 Barnard Hall
Colleen Thomas 3 13/20

DNCE BC3577 Performing the Political: Embodying Change in American Performance. 3 points.

Exploration into the politics of performance and the performance of politics.

DNCE BC3583 Gender and Historical Memory in American Dance of the 1930's to the Early 1960's. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: One course in dance history/studies or permission of the instructor.

Explores the question of why so many women dancer/choreographers of the 1930's - to the early 1960's, including relatively well-known ones, have ended up as peripheral rather than central players in what has become the master narrative of a crucial era of the recent dance past.

DNCE BC3980 Performing the Political: Embodying Change in American Performance. 4 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: An introductory course in dance or theatre history or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 12 students.

Exploration into the politics of performance and the performance of politics through the lens of 20th-century American dance.

Economics (Barnard)

ECON BC2010 The Economics of Gender. 3 points.

Examination of gender differences in the U.S. and other advanced industrial economies. Topics include the division of labor between home and market, the relationship between labor force participation and family structure, the gender earnings gap, occupational segregation, discrimination, and historical, racial, and ethnic group comparisons.

ECON BC2075 Logic and Limits of Economic Justice. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Economic Reasoning (ECON BC 1003) or Principles of Economics (ECON W1105). An introductory course in political theory or political philosophy is strongly recommended, but not required.

Introduce students to problems of economic justice under capitalism.  Course has three goals: (1) expose students to debates between economics and philosophers about the meaning and nature of justice, (2) explore conflict between efficiency and justice, (3) examine implications of justice for gender equality, intergenerational equity and climate change.

ECON BC3011 Inequality and Poverty. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035 or ECON BC3033, or permission of the instructor.

Conceptualization and measurement of inequality and poverty, poverty traps and distributional dynamics, economics and politics of public policies, in both poor and rich countries.

Fall 2019: ECON BC3011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3011 001/07801 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Ll103 Diana Center
Ashley Timmer 3 59/60

ECON BC3014 Entrepreneurship. 3 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035, or ECON BC3033, or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

Examines theoretical, empirical, and normative studies of entrepreneurial behavior and its significance. Examines their relationships with risk-taking and innovation. Explores entrepreneurship as applicable to a variety of behaviors, activities or contexts, including large organizations, small business networks, new venture creation, comparative financial institutions that support entrepreneurial environments, and entrepreneurship's contributions to a dynamic economy.

ECON BC3017 Economics of Business Organization. 3 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035 or permission of the instructor.

Economics of firm organization and the evolution of the modern business enterprise. The function of organizations in coordinating the use of economic resources. The role of technology, labor, management, and markets in the formation of the business enterprise. Includes international comparisons and attention to alternative economic theories on the role of business organizations on national competitive advantage.

ECON BC3019 Labor Economics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035, or permission of the instructor.

Factors affecting the allocation and remuneration of labor; population structure; unionization and monopsony; education and training, mobility and information; sex and race discrimination; unemployment; and public policy.

Fall 2019: ECON BC3019
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3019 001/07792 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
Ll104 Diana Center
Lalith Munasinghe 3 17/45

ECON BC3029 Empirical Development Economics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: (ECON BC3035 or ECON BC3033) and ECON UN3412 ECON BC3035 or ECON BC3033 and Econometrics, or permission of the instructor.

Examination of new challenges in the global economy from unequal income distribution and poor institutions to health epidemics and natural disasters. Accessing and analyzing real-time and historic data to understand the current global economy.  Applied econometric techniques.

ECON BC3031 Economics of Life. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035 ECON BC3018 Econometrics previously or concurrently taken is highly recommended.

This course covers an immense variety of topics in what might be called demographic economics. Included are dating and marriage, along with the economics of beauty; fertility and its avoidance; how people use their time, and what determines those uses, including some discussion of labor-force behavior; interactions among family members—bargaining in the household and with family members outside the household; divorce; the economics of addiction, to such agents as alcohol, other drugs, tobacco and even work; religion, including its effects on economic outcomes; and death, including how we die, how long we live, and the nature and determinants of bequests. The central unifying feature throughout the course is the concentration on the economics of these activities and outcomes—the roles of incentives and institutions in affecting them.

Education

EDUC BC3032 Contemporary Issues in Education. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Course enrollment will be determined after the first class meeting; application is available on CourseWorks.,,Open to all students; preference given to Urban Teaching, Education Studies and Urban Studies students.

Contemporary Issues in Education is an introduction to the range of intellectual dilemmas that are a part of American schooling through the illumination of the various social, philosophical, economic, and institutional forces that shape the learning environment. The topics serve to promote critical thought of educational dilemmas stemming from issues such as power and authority, the intersection of race, gender, socio-economic inequity, and challenges that confront students such as identity, marginalization and resiliency. This course is open to all students interested in investigating one’s best “fit” in the education realm, which may include classroom teaching, educational policy, reform, and NGO-based involvement.

EDUC BC3044 Education and Social Change in Comparative Global Contexts. 4 points.

This course will examine the relationship between education and social change in different regions of the world, with a focus on vulnerable populations (e.g., indigenous groups, street and working children, immigrants, women and girls; refugees). 

Fall 2019: EDUC BC3044
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EDUC 3044 001/07907 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Ll017 Milstein Center
Thea Abu El-Haj 4 24/28

EDUC BC3050 Science in the City. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

In partnership with the American Museum of Natural History students investigate science, science pedagogical methods, and ways to use New York City as a resource for science teaching and learning. Sessions will be held at Barnard and the museum. Field trips and fieldwork required. Non-science majors pre-service elementary students and first year students, welcome. Note: Students in the Childhood Urban Teaching Program may use this course as a pedagogical elective.

Spring 2019: EDUC BC3050
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EDUC 3050 001/04696 T 4:30pm - 6:20pm
Ll018 Milstein Center
Althea Hoard 4 12/20

EDUC BC3058 Science in the City II: Preparing Future Scientists Now. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Open to Non-science majors, pre-service elementary students, and first-year students.

Students investigate the science of learning, the Next Generation Science Standards, scientific inquiry and engineering design practices, and strategies to include families in fostering student achievement and persistence in science. Fieldwork required. Note: Students in the Childhood Urban Teaching Program may use this course as a pedagogical elective.

Fall 2019: EDUC BC3058
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EDUC 3058 001/00122 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
306 Milbank Hall
Althea Hoard 4 6/20

English

ENGL BC3101 The Writer's Process: A Seminar in the Teaching of Writing. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Application process and permission of instructor.

Exploration of theory and practice in the teaching of writing, designed for students who plan to become Writing Fellows at Barnard. Students will read current theory and consider current research in the writing process and engage in practical applications in the classroom or in tutoring. Writer’s Process is only open to those who applied to and were accepted into the Writing Fellows Program. Note: This course now counts as an elective for the English major.

Fall 2019: ENGL BC3101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3101 001/08024 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
406 Barnard Hall
Pamela Cobrin 4 18/20

ENGL BC3105 Fiction and Personal Narrative. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply. Instructions and the application form can be found here: https://english.barnard.edu/departmental-forms#creativewriting.

Section 1: In this workshop you will read and write across genre works of formally inventive and exciting contemporary prose, developing an innovative vocabulary to discuss writing. We will think of writing as process, from weekly exercises to longer pieces that will be workshopped twice a semester. 

,

Section 2 (priority Barnard first-year students; transfer and returning students will be accommodated if there is room in the course)This class centers on the appreciation, analysis, and practice of short literary fiction, including personal narrative. In addition to weekly writing exercises, twice a semester each student will make available to the entire class longer pieces for "workshopping." These pieces will receive written evaluations from instructor and peers both. We will also read and study narrative by published authors -- historical and contemporary. In both student-generated and published work we will consider elements of prose narrative from structure to characterization, plot to voice, etc., in the hopes that such consideration will encourage student writers to expand their writerly repertoire and improve their work in terms of both craft and literary substance.

ENGL BC3121 Public Speaking. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 14 students. Open only to undergraduates, preference to seniors and juniors. Attend first class for instructor permission. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.

This course will introduce you to principles of effective public speaking and debate, and provide practical opportunities to use these principles in structured speaking situations. You will craft and deliver speeches, engage in debates and panel discussions, analyze historical and contemporary speakers, and reflect on your own speeches and those of your classmates. You will explore and practice different rhetorical strategies with an emphasis on information, persuasion and argumentation. For each speaking assignment, you will go through the speech-making process, from audience analysis, purpose and organization, to considerations of style and delivery. The key criteria in this course are content, organization, and adaptation to the audience and purpose. While this is primarily a performance course, you will be expected to participate extensively as a listener and critic, as well as a speaker.

Spring 2019: ENGL BC3121
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3121 001/09138 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
409 Barnard Hall
Daniela Kempf 3 14
Fall 2019: ENGL BC3121
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3121 001/08039 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
409 Barnard Hall
Daniela Kempf 3 13

ENGL BC3123 Rhetorical Choices: the Theory and Practice of Public Speaking. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Application process and permission of instructor. Enrollment restricted to Barnard students.

Speaking involves a series of rhetorical choices regarding vocal presentation, argument construction, and physical affect that, whether made consciously or by default, project information about the identity of the speaker. In this course students will relate theory to practice: to learn principles of public speaking and speech criticism for the purpose of applying these principles as peer tutors in the Speaking Fellow Program. Note: This course now counts as an elective for the English major.

Fall 2019: ENGL BC3123
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3123 001/07999 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
407 Barnard Hall
Pamela Cobrin, Daniela Kempf 4 14/14

ENGL BC3196 Home to Harlem: Literature of the Harlem Renaissance. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 20 students.

In the spring of 2016, ENGL 3196y will be centered on the relationship between art, activism and social justice as this relationship was developed during the Harlem Renaissance and beyond. Exploring the cultural contexts and aesthetic debates that animated Harlem in 1920s to 1930s, the course will focus on the politics of literary and theatrical production, and explore the fashioning and performance of New Negro identity through fiction, poetry, essays, and artwork, with special attention to theater/performance. This course will partner with Harlem's National Black Theater and work toward an understanding of the relationship between art/literature and socio-political change through the NBT's spring 2016 production of Dominique Morisseau's Blood on the Root, a multi-genre performance piece on racial injustice inspired by the 2006 Jena Six case in Louisiana.

Spring 2019: ENGL BC3196
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3196 001/01203 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
504 Diana Center
Kristin Carter 4 27/60

ENGL BC3911 Senior Seminar: Write to Vote. 4 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

This seminar investigates the literary antecedents and cultural aftermath of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, with special attention to gendered and racial narratives of the ballot. Authors include Walt Whitman, Paul Lawrence Dunbar, Thomas Dixon, Jr., William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Fannie Lou Hamer and Alice Walker.

English Theatre

ENTH BC3140 Women and Theatre. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date, time, and location that sign-up sheets go up is listed here: http://english.barnard.edu/sign-ups

Exploration of the impact of women in theatre history--with special emphasis on American theatre history--including how dramatic texts and theatre practice have reflected the ever-changing roles of women in society. Playwrights include Glaspell, Crothers, Grimke, Hellman, Finley, Hughes, Deavere Smith, and Vogel.

ENTH BC3144 Black Theatre. 4 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Exploration of Black Theater, specifically African-American performance traditions, as an intervening agent in racial, cultural, and national identity. African-American theatre artists to be examined include Amiri Baraka, Kia Corthron, W.E.B. Du Bois, Angelina Grimke, Langston Hughes, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Adrienne Kennedy, Suzan-Lori Parks, Adrian Piper, and August Wilson. Fulfills one (of two) required courses in dramatic literature for Theatre/Drama and Theatre Arts major.

Environmental Science

EESC BC3019 Energy Resources. 3 points.

Energy Resources utilizes the physical plant of Barnard and Columbia to involve students in a semester long real-life policy study that explores the interconnections between energy resources and sustainable energy efficiency. Students work collaboratively as a team and interface with college faculty, administration, staff and student organizations to produce and disseminate a professional level policy report describing existing usage of energy, analyzing where change is needed.

EESC BC3300 Workshop in Sustainable Development. 4 points.

Students address real-world issues in sustainable development by working in groups for an external client agency.  Instruction in communication, collaboration, and management; meetings with and presentations to clients and academic community.  Projects vary from year to year.  Readings in the course are project-specific and are identified by the student research teams.

Fall 2019: EESC BC3300
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 3300 001/08042 T Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
113 Milstein Center
Martin Stute 4 13/18

Film

FILM BC3200 Film Production. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Prerequisites: FILM BC3201 or equivalent. Sophomore standing. Interested students MUST attend the first day of class for instructor permission--registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.

This workshop introduces the student to all the cinematic tools necessary to produce their own short narrative work.  Using what the student has learned in film studies, we'll break down shot syntax, mise-en-scene and editing strategies and master them in weekly video exercises.  We'll include casting, working with actors and expressive camera work in our process as we build toward a final video project.  By the end of the course, the student will have created a DVD containing a collection of their video pieces and their final project.  Priority given to junior and senior film majors.

Spring 2019: FILM BC3200
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3200 001/04614 W 2:10pm - 5:00pm
105 Milstein Center
Sandra Luckow 3 12/12
Fall 2019: FILM BC3200
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3200 001/08162 W 2:10pm - 5:00pm
105 Milstein Center
Sandra Luckow 3 14/12

FILM BC3702 Women Filmmakers. 4 points.

Women filmmakers have made major contributions to film.  Exemplifying distinctive styles and audiovisual language experimentation, these powerful and influential women include Agnès Varda, Euzhan Palcy, Chantal Akerman, Mira Nair, Sally Potter, Lina Wertmueller, Claire Denis, Elaine May, Kathryn Bigelow, Jane Campion, and more recently Susanne Bier, Lone Scherfig, Lynne Ramsay, Ava DuVernay, Lutecia Martel and Maren Ade. They all have contributed to the evolution of cinematic language through a substantial body of work and intelligent articulation of the filmmaking process. Combining screenings and readings, the course will study each of these filmmakers’ distinctive styles and narrative experiments and will critically assess the ways they pushed the medium as well as recurring themes in their body of work and how they translated into audiovisual language. Special attention will be given to how film movements such as Nouvelle Vague, Dogme 95, New Argentinian Cinema and the Berlin School liberated these filmmakers and to how it confronted their mainstream categorization and allowed for some substantial and artistically groundbreaking work.  

Spring 2019: FILM BC3702
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3702 001/04897 W 10:10am - 1:55pm
404 Barnard Hall
Breixo Viejo Vinas 4 21/20

History (Barnard)

HIST BC2500 Poverty, Race, and Gender. 3 points.

This course will begin with a theoretical overview of the relationship between race, gender and poverty.  We will look at definitions and sources of economic inequality, emerging discourses of poverty in the early 20th century, and changing perceptions of “the poor” over the course of American history. We will examine race and gender segmentation in the labor market, racial and gender conflict in the union movement, ideological foundations of the welfare state, cultural constructions of single motherhood, political debates about the “underclass,” as well as contemporary campaigns to alleviate poverty.  Our goal is to think critically about discourses of poverty and welfare as well as antipoverty, labor and feminist organizing.

HIST BC2567 Women, Gender and Sexuality in the 20th Century U.S.. 3 points.

Using an intersectional framework, this course traces changing notions of gender and sexuality in the 20th century United States.  The course examines how womanhood and feminism were shaped by class, race, ethnicity, culture, sexuality and immigration status.  We will explore how the construction of American nationalism and imperialism, as well as the development of citizenship rights, social policy, and labor organizing, were deeply influenced by the politics of gender.  Special emphasis will be placed on organizing and women's activism.

Fall 2019: HIST BC2567
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2567 001/08607 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
323 Milbank Hall
Premilla Nadasen 3 48/65

HIST BC2664 Reproducing Inequalities: Families in Latin American History. 3 points.

Explores changing structures and meanings of family in Latin America from colonial period to present. Particular focus on enduring tensions between "prescription" and "reality" in family forms as well as the articulation of family with hierarchies of class, caste, and color in diverse Latin American societies.

HIST BC2681 Women and Gender in Latin America. 3 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Examines the gendered roles of women and men in Latin American society from the colonial period to the present. Explores a number of themes, including the intersection of social class, race, ethnicity, and gender; the nature of patriarchy; masculinity; gender and the state; and the gendered nature of political mobilization.

HIST BC2803 Gender and Empire. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Examines how women experienced empire and asks how their actions and activities produced critical shifts in the workings of colonial societies worldwide. Topics include sexuality, the colonial family, reproduction, race, and political activism.

HIST BC2865 Gender and Power in China. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

This course explores the power dynamics of gender relations in Chinese history and contemporary society. Specifically, we seek to understand how a range of women--rulers, mothers, teachers, workers, prostitutes, and activists--exercised power by utilizing available resources to overcome institutional constraints.

HIST BC3323 The City in Europe. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preference to upper-class students. Preregistration required.

A social history of the city in Europe from early modern times; the economic, political, and intellectual forces influencing the growth of Paris, London, Vienna, and other urban centers.

HIST BC3491 Making Barnard History: The Research Process. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Introduction to historical research through a range of the historical sources and methods available for a comprehensive history of Barnard College. Will include a review of the secondary literature, the compiling and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data through archival research, the conduct of an oral history interview, and the construction of a historical narrative.

Spring 2019: HIST BC3491
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3491 001/04911 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
308 Diana Center
Robert McCaughey 4 17/15

HIST BC3549 A History of Violence: Bloodshed and Power in Early America. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Coercion, war, rape, murder, and riots are common in American History from the European invasion to the Civil War. How did violent acts transform early American societies? Readings are a mix of primary sources and scholarship. First and second year students are welcome with permission.

HIST BC3870 Gender and Migration: A Global Perspective. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required. Sophomore Standing.

Explores migration as a gendered process and what factors account for migratory differences by gender across place and time; including labor markets, education demographic and family structure, gender ideologies, religion, government regulations and legal status, and intrinsic aspects of the migratory flow itself.

HIST BC3879 Feminist Traditions in China. 4 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Background in Women's Studies and/or Chinese Studies helpful, but not necessary. Sophomore standing. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Explores the intellectual, social and cultural grounds for the establishment and transmission of feminist traditions in China before the 19th century.  Topics include pre-modern Chinese views of the body, self, gender, and sex, among others.  Our goal is to rethink such cherished concepts as voice, agency, freedom, and choice that have shaped the modern feminist movement.

HIST BC3901 Reacting to the Past II. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.
Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20. Preregistration required. Reacting I, a First-Year seminar, is recommended.

Collision of ideas in two of the following three contexts: "Rousseau, Burke and Revolution in France, 1791;" "The Struggle for Palestine: The British, Zionists, and Palestinians in the 1930s," or "India on the Eve of Independence, 1945".

HIST BC3999 Transnational Feminism. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Examines the theory and practice of transnational feminist activism. We will explore the ways in which race, class, culture and nationality facilitate alliances among women, reproduce hierarchical power relations, and help reconstruct gender.  The course covers a number of topics:  the African Diaspora, suffrage, labor, development policy, colonialism, trafficking, consumerism, Islam, and the criminal justice system.

HIST GU4217 Women as Cold War Weapons . 4 points.

Cold War ideological campaigns for the “hearts and minds” abutted “hot war” confrontations between 1945 and 1991, and women engaged with both. This course has three purposes: (i) to examine the role of women in the United States as a reflection and enactment of Cold War politics; (ii) to provide an understanding of cultural forces in building ideas in foreign markets; (iii) to reframe the understanding of power as a strategy of United States Cold War battles. To this end, the class will open with a history and examination of women and the traditional narratives of the nation at “wars,” and then continue to explore the political power of women, cultural diplomacy, military operations, and conclude with two case studies. This seminar examines the history of government and private sector mechanisms used to export national ideals by and about women in order to enact American foreign policy agendas in the Cold War. To build their knowledge, students will be asked to parse primary materials in the context of secondary readings. They will do class presentations and present at a conference, and will have the opportunity to discuss their interests with leading scholars of the Cold War. The requirements include significant weekly readings, postings, attendance at discussions, a class presentation, and participation in the class conference at the conclusion of the semester.

Fall 2019: HIST GU4217
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4217 001/10358 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Victoria Phillips 4 10/20

HIST UN2523 History of Health Inequality in the Modern United States. 4 points.

Through assigned readings and a group research project, students will gain familiarity with a range of historical and social science problems at the intersection of ethnic/racial/sexual formations, technological networks, and health politics since the turn of the twentieth century. Topics to be examined will include, but will not be limited to, black women's health organization and care; HIV/AIDS politics, policy, and community response; "benign neglect"; urban renewal and gentrification; medical abuses and the legacy of Tuskegee; tuberculosis control; and environmental justice. There are no required qualifications for enrollment, although students will find the material more accessible if they have had previous coursework experience in United States history, pre-health professional (pre-med, pre-nursing, or pre-public health), African-American Studies, Women and Gender Studies, Ethnic Studies, or American Studies. 

Fall 2019: HIST UN2523
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2523 001/36483 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
503 Hamilton Hall
Samuel Roberts 4 24/54

History-East Asian

HSEA W4888 Woman and Gender in Korean History. 4 points.

While the rise of women's history and feminist theory in the 1960s and 1970s fostered more general reevaluations of social and cultural history in the West, such progressions have been far more modest in Korean history. To introduce one of the larger challenges in current Korean historiography, this course explores the experiences, consciousness and representations of women Korea at home and abroad from premodern times to the present. Historical studies of women and gender in Korea will be analyzed in conjunction with theories of Western women's history to encourage new methods of rethinking "patriarchy" within the Korean context. By tracing the lives of women from various socio-cultural aspects and examining the multiple interactions between the state, local community, family and individual, women's places in the family and in society, their relationships with one another and men, and the evolution of ideas about gender and sexuality throughout Korea's complicated past will be reexamined through concrete topics with historical specificity and as many primary sources as possible. With understanding dynamics of women's lives in Korean society, this class will build an important bridge to understand the construction of New Women in early twentieth-century Korea, when women from all walks of life had to accommodate their "old-style" predecessors and transform themselves to new women, as well as the lives of contemporary Korean women. This will be very much a reading-and-discussion course. Lectures will review the readings in historical perspective and supplement them. The period to be studied ranges from the pre-modern time up to the turn of twentieth century, with special attention to the early modern period.

Human Rights Studies

HRTS BC1025 Human Rights in Theory and Practice. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.

Provides a broad overview of the rapidly expanding field of human rights. Lectures on the philosophical, historical, legal and institutional foundations are interspersed with weekly presentations by frontline advocates from the U.S. and overseas.

Spring 2019: HRTS BC1025
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HRTS 1025 001/05170 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
328 Milbank Hall
J. Paul Martin 3 46/60

HRTS UN3001 Introduction to Human Rights. 3 points.

Evolution of the theory and content of human rights; the ideology and impact of human rights movements; national and international human rights law and institutions; their application with attention to universality within states, including the U.S., and internationally.

Fall 2019: HRTS UN3001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HRTS 3001 001/57007 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
207 Mathematics Building
Andrew Nathan 3 134/150

Music

MUSI BC3139 Introduction to Vocal Repertoire: Technique in Singing and Performance. 3 points.

This course is designed for developing singers. Group vocalizing, learning of songs and individual workshop performances are aimed at improving the student's  technical skill and the elements necessary to create a meaningful musical and dramatic experience. Attention to text, subtext, emotional and psychological aspects of a piece and the performer's  relationship to the audience are included in the work. Repertoire is predominantly in English and comes from both classical and popular traditions Individual coaching sessions are available with the class accompanist and help strengthen the students' confidence and skill. The class culminates with an in-class performance.

Spring 2019: MUSI BC3139
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3139 001/04804 F 2:00pm - 5:00pm
405 Milbank Hall
Josephine Mongiardo 3 14
Fall 2019: MUSI BC3139
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3139 001/08859 F 12:00pm - 1:45pm
405 Milbank Hall
Jean-Paul Bjorlin 3 8/10
MUSI 3139 001/08859 M 4:10pm - 5:55pm
405 Milbank Hall
Jean-Paul Bjorlin 3 8/10

MUSI BC3140 Vocal Repertoire, Technique and Expression. 3 points.

Vocal exercises and exploration of wide-ranging repertoires, styles, and languages of the Western European song tradition. The rich variety of English, French, Italian and German poetry and music from the Baroque period through the Twentieth Century allows the student to experience both the music and the cultural environment of each of these styles. Attention is given both to meaning oftext and musical interpretation. Individual coaching sessions are available with the class accompanist and help strengthen the students' confidence and skill. The class culminates with an in-class performance.

Spring 2019: MUSI BC3140
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3140 001/06010 F 12:15pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Jean-Paul Bjorlin 3 8
MUSI 3140 001/06010 M 5:30pm - 7:15pm
Room TBA
Jean-Paul Bjorlin 3 8
Fall 2019: MUSI BC3140
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3140 001/08860 F 2:00pm - 5:00pm
405 Milbank Hall
Josephine Mongiardo 3 7/17

MUSI V3462 Music, Gender and Performance. 3 points.

Prerequisites: there are no prerequisites for this course.

This seminar explores relationships between gender, music and performance from the perspective of ethnomusicology, cultural anthropology, critical music studies, feminist and queer theory and performance studies. We examine debates around issues of sex and gender and nature and culture through the lens of musical performance and experience. Some questions we consider include: In what ways is participation in particular music dictated by gendered conventions? What social purpose do these delineations serve? What might music tell us about the body? What is the relationship between performance and the ways in which masculinity and feminity, homosexuality and heterosexuality are shaped? How can we think about the concept of nation via gender and music? How might the gendered performances and the voices of musical celebrities come to represent or officially "speak" for the nation or particular publics? How does music shape our understanding of emotion, our experience of pleasure?

Philosophy

PHIL UN2110 Philosophy and Feminism. 3 points.

Is there an essential difference between women and men? How do questions about race conflict or overlap with those about gender? Is there a "normal" way of being "queer"? Introduction to philosophy and feminism through a critical discussion of these and other questions using historical and contemporary texts, art, and public lectures. Focus includes essentialism, difference, identity, knowledge, objectivity, and queerness.

Fall 2019: PHIL UN2110
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 2110 001/45516 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
833 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Christia Mercer 3 96/120

Political Science (Barnard)

POLS BC3200 American Political Development, 1789-1980. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: V 1201 or equivalent intro course in American Politics.

American Political Development (APD) is an emerging subfield within American Politics that focuses on the ways that political culture, ideology, governing structures (executives, legislatures, judiciaries, and subnational governments) and structures of political linkage (political parties and organized interests) shape the development of political conflict and public policy. Rejecting the fragmentation of the field of American Politics into narrow specialties, it links government, politics, policy, culture, and economics in a broad-gauged search for understanding.  (Cross-listed by the American Studies Program.)

POLS BC3254 First Amendment Values. 3 points.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or an equivalent. Not an introductory course. Not open to students who have taken the colloquium POLS BC3302.

Examines the first amendment rights of speech, press, religion and assembly. In-depth analysis of landmark Supreme Court rulings provides the basis for exploring theoretical antecedents as well as contemporary applications of such doctrines as freedom of association, libel, symbolic speech, obscenity, hate speech, political speech, commercial speech, freedom of the press and religion. (Cross-listed by the American Studies Program.)

Spring 2019: POLS BC3254
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3254 001/01940 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
323 Milbank Hall
Paula Franzese 3 49/58

POLS BC3300 * Colloquium on Political Participation and Democracy. 4 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS BC1001 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Examination of the role of citizen participation in the development of American democracy. Topics include movements of women, workers, racial minorities and students; community organizing; voting, parties, and electoral laws; and contemporary anti-corporate movements. Syllabus.

POLS BC3331 * Colloquium on American Political Decisionmaking. 4 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

Readings on decisionmaking, policy analysis, and the political setting of the administrative process. Students will simulate an ad hoc Cabinet Committee assigned to prepare a presidential program to deal with aspects of the foreign aid program involving hunger and malnutrition. (Cross-listed by the American Studies Program and by the Athena Center for Leadership Studies.)

POLS BC3332 * Colloquium on Exploring Political Leadership in the U.S.. 4 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

Exploration of the effect of political leadership on political outcomes in the United States, with special attention to how individual characteristics, like personality, political style, ideology, gender, race and class, interact with the political environment in shaping political outcomes. (Cross-listed by the American Studies Program and by the Athena Center for Leadership Studies.)

POLS BC3402 The Comparative Politics of Gender Inequality. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I).

Prerequisites: Not an introductory-level course. Not open to students who have taken the colloquium POLS BC 3507. Enrollment limited to 20 students; L-course sign-up through eBear. Barnard syllabus.

Uses major analytical perspectives in comparative politics to understand the persistence of gender inequality in advanced industrial states. Topics include: political representation and participation; political economy and capitalism; the historical development of welfare states; electoral systems, electoral quotas; the role of supranational and international organizations; and social policy.

POLS BC3410 *Colloquium on Human Rights in a Diverse World. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Not open to students who have taken or are currently taking POLS UN3002. Prerequisites: POLS V1013 or HRTS UN3001 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students.

 Examination of human rights within the context of international migration. The course covers topics such as citizenship, state sovereignty, border control, asylum-seekers, refugees, and undocumented immigrants. (Cross-listed by the Human Rights Program.) 

POLS BC3445 Colloquium on Gender and Public Policy. 4 points.

In this course, we will examine how notions of sex and gender have shaped public policies, and how public policies have affected the social, economic, and political citizenship of men and women in the United States over time.

POLS BC3507 *Colloquium on Gender, Politics, and Markets. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS V1501 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

Considers why men more than women control political and economic resources in advanced industrial states of the world.  Examines how labor markets, welfare states, and political institutions have a different impact on women than men.  Evaluates attempts at increasing gender equality in political representation, labor market participation, and household work.  *Please note, students who have already taken BC 3402 The Compative Politics of Gender Inequality may not register for this colloquium.* (Cross-listed by the Womens Studies Program.)

POLS BC3521 Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. 3 points.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or the equivalent. Not an introductory-level course. Not open to students who have taken the colloquium POLS BC3326. Enrollment limited to 25 students; L-course sign-up through eBear. Barnard syllabus.

Explores seminal caselaw to inform contemporary civil rights and civil liberties jurisprudence and policy.  Specifically, the readings examine historical and contemporary first amendment values, including freedom of speech and the press, economic liberties, takings law, discrimination based on race, gender, class and sexual preference, affirmative action, the right to privacy, reproductive freedom, the right to die, criminal procedure and adjudication, the rights of the criminally accused post-9/11 and the death penalty. (Cross-listed by the American Studies and Human Rights Programs.)

Fall 2019: POLS BC3521
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3521 001/09166 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
328 Milbank Hall
Paula Franzese 3 54/58

POLS BC3805 *Colloquium on International Organization. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS V1601 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

Exploration of the various structures, institutions, and processes that order relations among states and/or actors in the international system. Emphasis will be placed on contemporary issues such as dilemmas of humanitarian intervention, the politics of international institutions, the rise of non-governmental organizations, and globalization.

POLS V3240 Race, Law, and American Politics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: POLS V 1201 or equivalent

This class focuses on the broader implications of race as it relates to constitutional law, resistance movements and political economy. This class examines the dynamic relationship between race, law and American politics as a lens by which to interrogate core concepts in legal, social and political decision-making. Enrollment limited to 40 students.

POLS V3313 American Urban Politics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Patterns of government and politics in America's large cities and suburbs: the urban socioeconomic environment; the influence of party leaders, local officials, social and economic notables, and racial, ethnic, and other interest groups; mass media, the general public, and the state and federal governments; and the impact of urban governments on ghetto and other urban conditions. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 3213.

POLS V3615 Globalization and International Politics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Explores how globalization affects the structures and functions of the international economy, state sovereignty, international security, and international civil society. Emphasis on problems of international governance, legitimacy and accountability, and the evolving organizational processes that characterize contemporary international politics.

POLS V3675 Russia and the West. 3 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

An exploration of Russia's ambiguous relationship with the West, focusing on the political,cultural, philosophic,and historical roots of this relationship, as well as its foreign policy consequenses. Cases are drawn from tsarist, Soviet, and post-Soviet periods. Special emphasis is placed on issues of political economy and international security.

POLS W4316 The American Presidency. 3 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or any course that qualifies for the the introductory-level American Politics course. Barnard syllabus. \n \n "L" sign-up through eBear.

Growth of presidential power, creation and use of the institutionalized presidency, presidential-congressional and presidential-bureaucratic relationships, and the presidency and the national security apparatus. (Cross-listed by the American Studies Program.)

Psychology (Barnard)

PSYC BC2137 Social Psychology Laboratory. 1.5 point.

Prerequisites: BC1001 Introduction to Psychology and departmental permission via Barnard Department of Psychology Lab and Statistics Lottery (students enter lottery via eBear the previous semester). Enrollment limited to 25 students per section.
Corequisites: BC1138 Social Psychology Lecture.

Laboratory course covering contemporary theory and research on social thought and behavior. Issues such as person perception, attitudes, attraction, aggression, stereotyping, group dynamics, and social exchange will be explored. The application of theory and research to addressing social problems will be discussed.

PSYC BC2138 Social Psychology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BC1001 or permission of the instructor.

Lecture course covering contemporary theory and research on social thought and behavior. Issues such as person perception, attitudes, attraction, aggression, stereotyping, group dynamics, and social exchange will be explored. The application of theory and research to addressing social problems will be discussed.

PSYC BC2151 Organizational Psychology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BC1001 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment strictly limited to 45 students; decided upon and finalized first week of classes.

Introduction to behavior of individuals and small groups in work organizations. Recent theory and research emphasizing both content and research methodology. Motivation and performance, attitudes and job satisfaction, power, influence, authority, leadership, cooperation and conflict, decision making, and communications. Enrollment limited to 45; and only seniors. 

Spring 2019: PSYC BC2151
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 2151 001/07185 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
328 Milbank Hall
Ariel Bernstein 3 42/40
Fall 2019: PSYC BC2151
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 2151 001/09331 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
328 Milbank Hall
Elisabeth Mah 3 32/36

PSYC BC3153 Psychology and Women. 4 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and at least two psychology courses. Permission of the instructor required for majors other than Psychology or Women's Studies. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Examines how female experience is and has been understood by psychologists. Through an understanding of gender as a social construction and issues raised by the intersections of gender, sexuality, class, and race, the course will analyze assumptions about what causes us to be gendered and about how being gendered affects behavior.

PSYC BC3166 Social Conflict. 4 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: BC1001 and one additional Psychology course. Or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Survey of the literature on development of social conflict, the motivations and cognitions of individuals in conflict, and the procedures available for resolving conflict. Particular emphasis will be placed on the psychology of fairness and its implications for conflict resolution.

PSYC BC3364 Psychology of Leadership. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Students must have one of the following pre-requisites for this course: PSYC BC1125 Personality Psychology, PSYC BC1138 Social Psychology, or PSYC BC2151 Organizational Psychology, and permission by the instructor.

An in-depth examination of the concept of leadership in psychology with an emphasis on women’s leadership. Topics include the role of gender, culture, and emotional intelligence as well as an examination of transactional and transformational models. Topics will be discussed with an equal emphasis on theory, research, and application.  Students must have prerequisites and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15.

Spring 2019: PSYC BC3364
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 3364 001/08514 Th 11:00am - 12:50pm
306 Milbank Hall
Tara Well 4 9/10

PSYC BC3379 Psychology of Stereotyping and Prejudice. 4 points.

Prerequisites: (PSYC BC1001) Permission of the instructor.

Review of current literature from experimental social psychology pertaining to stereotyping and prejudice. Topics include: functions and costs of stereotyping, the formation and maintenance of stereotypes, and stereotype change. Recent research concerning the role of cognitive processes in intergroup perception will be emphasized.

Religion

RELI V3650 Religion and the Civil Rights Movement. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Examination of the role of religion in the drive for civil rights during the 1950s and 1960s. The course will look at the role of activists, churches, clergy, sermons, and music in forging the consensus in favor of civil rights.

RELI W4610 Science, Nature, and Religion in 20th Century America. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA).
Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Examination of the relationship between scientific and religious ideas, with particular reference to American culture in the twentieth century. Explores the impact of such events as the Scopes trial and the popular faith in science and technology of the religious attitudes and beliefs of 20th-century Americans.

RELI W4670 Native American Religions. 4 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Limited to 20 students.

Examines the varieties of Native American religions and spirituality, from contact to the present, including a look at the effects of European religions on Native American traditions.

RELI W4721 Religion and Social Justice. 4 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Sophomore standing.

Examines current debates on three topics (religious reasons in public discourse, human rights, and democracy). Also looks briefly at some uses of the Exodus story, focusing on Michael Walzer's study of its political uses, Edward Said's criticism of Walzer's use of it in connection with contemporary Israel, and its role in debates among African Americans in the nineteenth century.

Science and Public Policy (Barnard)

SCPP BC3335 Environmental Leadership, Ethics & Action. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.

Prerequisites: One year of college science. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Instructor's permission requirement. Contact D. Dittrick.

Reviews environmental literature to examine consequences of human interaction with Earth's ecosystem. Module I: The Individual: Relationship of Humankind to Natural World. Human role in environmental decline. Module II: The Community: Coming Together for Greater Good. Key theories of environmental ethics and social justice. Module III: Environmental Stewardship: Successful Models of Leadership. Student teams research and create stewardship projects. Science, non-science, fiction, and non-fiction texts.

Sociology (Barnard)

SOCI BC3903 Work and Culture. 4 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: Preference for Barnard Leadership Initiative participants, Juniors and Seniors. Permission of the instructor.

Sociological approaches to understanding work and culture. Theoretical underpinnings of workplace interactions, with attention to ethnographies of work across a range of organizations. Examines changes in work due to technological advances and globalization. Special emphasis on gender.

SOCI BC3907 Communities and Social Change. 4 points.

Examines how changes in the economy, racial composition, and class relations affect community life-how it is created, changed and sometimes lost-with a specific focus on the local urban context. Student research projects will address how contemporary forces such as neoliberalization, gentrification and tourism impact a community's social fabric.

Spring 2019: SOCI BC3907
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3907 001/03993 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
502 Diana Center
Marnie Brady 4 18/25

SOCI BC3909 Ethnic Conflict and Unrest. 4 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing. SOCI BC1003 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Post-1965 immigration in the U.S. has prompted conflicts between new immigrant groups and established racial and ethnic groups. This seminar explores ethnic conflict and unrest that takes place in the streets, workplace, and everyday social life. Focus is on sociological theories that explain the tensions associated with the arrival of new immigrants.

SOCI BC3913 Inequalities: Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in U.S. Law and Society. 4 points.

This class will examine the historical roots and ongoing persistence of social, economic, and political inequality and the continuing role that it plays in U.S. society by examining how such issues have been addressed both in social science and in law.

SOCI BC3935 Gender and Organizations. 4 points.

This course examines the sociological features of organizations through a gender lens. We will analyze how gender, race, class, and sexuality matter for individuals and groups within a variety of organizational contexts. The course is grounded in the sociological literatures on gender and organizations.

SOCI UN3235 Social Movements. 3 points.

Prerequisites: One introductory course in Sociology suggested.

Social movements and the theories social scientists use to explain them, with emphasis on the American civil rights and women's movements.  Topics include theories of participation, the personal and social consequences of social movements, the rationality of protest, the influence of ideology, organization, and the state on movement success, social movements, and the mass media.

Fall 2019: SOCI UN3235
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3235 001/09586 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
323 Milbank Hall
Debra Minkoff 3 28/45

SOCI UN3264 The Changing American Family. 3 points.

Worries and debates about the family are in the news daily. But how in fact is "the family" changing? And why? This course will study the family from a sociological perspective with primary emphasis on continuity and change and variation across different historical eras. We'll examine how the diversity of family life and constellations of intimacy and care are shaped by gender, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and sexuality.   Discussion section (required) will engage with readings as well as events in the news/ social media of interest to students.  

SOCI V3220 Masculinity: A Sociological View. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I).
Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: One introductory course in Sociology is suggested.

Examines the cultural, political, and institutional forces that govern masculinity. Focuses on various meanings of "being a man" and the effects these different types of masculinity have on both men and women. Explores some of the variation among men and relationships between men and women.

SOCI V3318 The Sociology of Sexuality. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.
Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: Introductory course in Sociology is suggested.

Social, cultural and organizational aspects of sex in the contemporary United States, stressing the plural in sexualities: sexual revolution and post-Victorian ideologies; the context of gender and inequality; social movements and sexual identity; the variety of sexual meanings and communities; the impact of AIDS.

SOCI V3324 Poverty, Inequality, and Policy: A Sociological Perspective. 4 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: Introductory course in Sociology is suggested.

Examination of poverty, the "underclass," and inequality in the United States. Part 1: The moral premises, social theories, and political interests shaping current debates about the poor. Part 2: A more concrete analysis of the lives of the poor and the causes of family breakdown, the drug economy, welfare, employment, and homelessness.

SOCI UN3265 Sociology of Work and Gender. 3 points.

This course examines gender as a flexible but persistent boundary that continues to organize our work lives and our home lives, as well as the relationship between the two spheres. We will explore the ways in which gender affects how work is structured; the relationship between work and home; the household as a place of paid (and unpaid) labor; and how changes in the global economy affect gender and work identities.

Spring 2019: SOCI UN3265
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3265 001/77414 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
501 Northwest Corner
Teresa Sharpe 3 86/147

SOCI UN3936 Sociology and the Public. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Sociological Imagination (SOCI UN1202) or The Social World (SOCI UN1000) (not required).

This seminar will examine the practice of and-for those interested-allow for some engagement in "public sociology." Public sociology is defined, accurately, on Wikipedia as "a subfield of the wider sociological discipline that emphasizes expanding the disciplinary boundaries of sociology in order to engage with non-academic audiences"; and as a sometimes controversial "movement" that "aims  to revitalize the discipline ... by leveraging its empirical methods and theoretical insights to contribute to debates not just about what is or what has been in society, but about what society might yet be."

Spanish

SPAN BC3510 Gender and Sexuality in Latin American Cultures. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

Examines constructions of gender and sexuality in Latin American cultures. Through a close analysis of critical, literary, and visual texts, we explore contemporary notions of gender and sexuality, the socio-cultural processes that have historically shaped these, and some theoretical frameworks through which they have been understood.

Theatre

THTR UN2005 Acting Workshop. 3 points.

When offered in Fall semester, open only to first-year students.

Prerequisites: Acting classes are open to all Barnard and Columbia undergraduates. Permission of Theatre Department through audition required: auditions for acting classes and for the semester's stage productions held 6pm on the first Tuesday and Wednesday class days of each semester. Acting classes begin meeting after auditions. For required details, consult "Auditions" on the Barnard Theatre Department website in advance: theatre.barnard.edu/auditions.

Course develops the processes and tools an actor needs to approach the text of a play. Students develop their physical, vocal, and imaginative range and skills through voice and speech exercises, work on non-verbal behavior, improvisation, and character development.  IN THE FALL SEMESTER OPEN ONLY TO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS. Course encouraged for prospective BC Theatre and CU Drama and Theatre Arts majors.

Fall 2019: THTR UN2005
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
THTR 2005 001/09740 M W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Ll200 Diana Center
Sharon Fogarty 3 14/15
THTR 2005 002/09741 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
Ll200 Diana Center
Gisela Cardenas Ojeda 3 12/15

THTR UN3140 Performing Women. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students.

This course examines the category of "woman" as it is mobilized in performance, considering both a variety of contemporary performances chosen from a wide range of genres and a diversity of critical/theoretical perspectives.

Fall 2019: THTR UN3140
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
THTR 3140 001/09742 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Ll105 Diana Center
Shayoni Mitra 4 12/16

Urban Studies

URBS UN3530 Urban Development: A Rubik's Cube of Policy Choices. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Must attend first class for instructor permission. Preference to Urban Studies majors. Only 16 admitted.

Using case studies, examines the rationale for urban development, the players involved and how decisions are made about the distribution of public and private resources. Studies the specific components of the development process and the myriad policy questions that large-scale development is meant to address. Examines the disconnect among stakeholders' objectives - the developer, the financial institution that pays for the project, the government and the community.

URBS V3550 Community Building and Economic Development. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Must attend first class for instructor permission. Preference to Urban Studies majors.

Community building has emerged as an important approach to creating an economic base, reducing poverty and improving the quality of life in urban neighborhoods. In this course, students examine the methods, strategies, and impact of community building on the economic, social, and political development of urban neighborhoods.

URBS V3920 Social Entrepreneurship. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I).

Prerequisites: Must attend first class for instructor permission. Preference to Urban Studies majors. General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC). Only 16 admitted.

Introduction to the main concepts and processes associated with the creation of new social enterprises, policies, programs, and organizations; criteria for assessing business ventures sponsored by non-profits and socially responsible initiatives undertaken by corporations; specific case studies using New York City as a laboratory. To be offered Fall 2011.

Women's Studies (Barnard)

WMST BC3131 Women and Science. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students.

History and politics of women's involvement with science. Women's contributions to scientific discovery in various fields, accounts by women scientists, engineers, and physicians, issues of science education. Feminist critiques of biological research and of the institution of science.

WMST UN1001 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies. 3 points.

An interdisciplinary introduction to key concepts and analytical categories in women's and gender studies. This course grapples with gender in its complex intersection with other systems of power and inequality, including: sexuality, race and ethnicity, class and nation. Topics include: feminisms, feminist and queer theory, commodity culture, violence, science and technology, visual cultures, work, and family.

Spring 2019: WMST UN1001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WMST 1001 001/00410 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Rebecca Young 3 53/120

WMST UN3915 Gender and Power in Transnational Perspective. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.

Prerequisites: Instructor approval required

Considers formations of gender, sexuality, and power as they circulate transnationally, as well as transnational feminist movements that have emerged to address contemporary gendered inequalities. Topics include political economy, global care chains, sexuality, sex work and trafficking, feminist politics, and human rights.

,

If it is a small world after all, how do forces of globalization shape and redefine both men’s and women’s positions as as workers and political subjects? And, if power swirls everywhere, how are transnational power dynamics reinscribed in gendered bodies? How is the body represented in discussions of the political economy of globalization? These questions will frame this course by highlighting how gender and power coalesce to impact the lives of individuals in various spaces including workplaces, the home, religious institutions, refugee camps, the government, and civil society, and human rights organizations. We will use specific sociological and anthropological case studies, to look at how various regimes of power operate to constrain individuals as well as give them new spaces for agency.This course will enable us to think transnationally, historically, and dynamically, using gender as a lens through which to critique relations of power and the ways that power informs our everyday lives and identities. 

Spring 2019: WMST UN3915
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WMST 3915 001/77347 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Selina Makana 4 1/20
Fall 2019: WMST UN3915
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WMST 3915 001/63378 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
754 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Selina Makana 4 23/25

WMST V3312 Theorizing Activism. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Critical Approaches or Feminist Theory or permission of instructor.

Helps students develop and apply useful theoretical models to feminist organizing on local and international levels.  It involves reading, presentations, and seminar reports.  Students use first-hand knowledge of the practices of specific women's activist organizations for theoretical work.

WMST W4301 Early Jewish Women Immigrant Writers: 1900-1939. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Enrollment limited to 15.

Prerequisites: students must attend first day of class and admission will be decided then.

Covers significant pre-Holocaust texts (including Yiddish fiction in translation) by U.S. Ashkenazi women and analyzes the tensions between upholding Jewish identity and the necessity and/or inevitability of integration and assimilation. It also examines women's quests to realize their full potential in Jewish and non-Jewish communities on both sides of the Atlantic.

WMST W4303 Gender, Globalization, and Empire. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I).

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Study of the role of gender in economic structures and social processes comprising globalization and in political practices of contemporary U.S. empire. This seminar focuses on the ways in which transformations in global political and economic structures over the last few decades including recent political developments in the U.S. have been shaped by gender, race, sexuality, religion and social movements.

WMST W4304 Gender and HIV/AIDS. 4 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 15 students.

An interdisciplinary exploration of feminist approaches to HIV/AIDS with emphasis on the nexus of science and social justice.

WMST W4307 Sexuality and the Law. 4 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: Because this seminar emphasizes weekly discussion and examination of the readings, enrollment is strictly limited to 20 students. Please read and follow the updated instructions: 1) Interested students must write a 50-100 word essay answering the following question: "What background, experience or expertise do you bring to the discussion of Sexuality and the Law that will help inform and challenge the other 19 students in the class?"; 2) Include the following: your name, institution you are graduating from, year of graduation, declared major, and whether you are working towards a Women's Studies major or minor; 3) Send your information and essay through email with the subject line "Barnard Sexuality & the Law"; 4) Send your email to Riya Ortiz, WS Department Assistant, at sortiz@barnard.edu no later than Wednesday, September 1, 2010. The final list of students who are registered for the course will be announced on Friday, September 3, 12 pm. Classes start on Monday, September 13. (Note: Students who have registered for the course must also submit the essay to guarantee their registration).

Explores how sexuality is defined and contested in various domains of law (Constitutional, Federal, State), how scientific theories intersect with legal discourse, and takes up considerations of these issues in family law, the military, questions of speech, citizenship rights, and at the workplace.

WMST W4308 Sexuality and Science. 4 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Examines scientific research on human sexuality, from early sexology through contemporary studies of biology and sexual orientation, surveys of sexual behavior, and the development and testing of Viagra. How does such research incorporate, reflect, and reshape cultural ideas about sexuality? How is it useful, and for whom?

WMST W4309 Sex, Gender and Transgender Queries. 4 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Sex, sexual identity, and the body are produced in and through time.  “Trans” – as an identity, a set of practices, a question, a site, or as a verb of change and connection – is a relatively new term which this course will situate in theory, time, discipline, and through the study of representation.

WMST W4320 Queer Theories and Histories. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

The course will cover a range of (mostly U.S. and mostly 20th-Century) materials that thematize gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender experience and identity. We will study fiction and autobiographical texts, historical, psychoanalytic, and sociological materials, queer theory, and films, focusing on modes of representing sexuality and on the intersections between sexuality and race, ethnicity, class, gender, and nationality. We will also investigate connections between the history of LGBT activism and current events. Authors will include Foucault, Freud, Butler, Sedgwick, Anzaldua, Moraga, Smith. Students will present, and then write up, research projects of their own choosing.