Chair: Kristina Milnor 
Professors: Nancy Worman, Kristina Milnor
Associate Professor: Ellen Morris
Adjunct Professor: Helene Foley


Other officers of the University offering courses in Classics:
 

Professors: Kathy H. Eden, Carmela Franklin, Stathis Gourgouris, John Ma, Seth Schwartz, Deborah Steiner, Karen Van Dyck, Katharina Volk, Gareth Williams
Associate Professors: Marcus Folch, Joseph Howley, Elizabeth Irwin
Assistant Professors: Alan Ross
Senior Lecturers: Elizabeth Scharffenberg
Lecturers: Dimitris Antoniou (Hellenic Studies), Chrysanthe Filippardos (Modern Greek), Nikolas Kakkoufa (Modern Greek), Darcy Krasne, Paraskevi Martzavou, Charles McNamara

Requirements for the Majors in Classics and Ancient Studies

Fulfilling the Foreign Language requirement

Students may fulfill the foreign language requirement in Greek by completing GREK V1202 Intermediate Greek II: Homer, or in Latin by completing LATN UN1202 Intermediate Latin II, or by completing one course in Greek or Latin at the 3000 level or above. In rare instances, the language requirement may be fulfilled by passing an exemption examination with a sufficiently high grade. This examination tests the student's knowledge of grammar and her ability to translate written Greek or Latin.

Major in Classics

Greek

The major in Greek is fulfilled by taking the following courses as well as five other courses above the elementary level in Ancient Greek.

GREK UN3996THE MAJOR SEMINAR
GREK W4139Elements of Prose Style
GREK GU4106HISTORY OF GREEK LITERATURE II
GREK GU4105HISTORY OF GREEK LITERATURE I

Latin

The major in Latin is fulfilled by taking one term of the following courses, as well as five other courses in Latin. 

LATN UN3996THE MAJOR SEMINAR
LATN GU4105LAT LITERATURE OF THE REPUBLIC
LATN GU4106HISTORY OF LATIN LIT II
LATN GU4139Elements of Prose Style

Students planning to go on to graduate study in classics are strongly urged to take both semesters of GREK GU4105 HISTORY OF GREEK LITERATURE I, GREK GU4106 HISTORY OF GREEK LITERATURE II or LATN GU4105 LAT LITERATURE OF THE REPUBLIC, LATN GU4106 HISTORY OF LATIN LIT II. Majors in Latin, especially those who have begun their study in high school, are strongly advised to take at least two semesters of Greek.

In addition, one semester of ancient history appropriate to the major and two relevant courses in ancient art, classical civilization or literature, ancient philosophy, or religion are required for either the Greek or the Latin major. Students who do not opt to take a term of either GREK GU4105 HISTORY OF GREEK LITERATURE I-GREK GU4106 HISTORY OF GREEK LITERATURE II or LATN GU4105 LAT LITERATURE OF THE REPUBLIC-LATN GU4106 HISTORY OF LATIN LIT II are required to take CLLT GU4300 THE CLASSICAL TRADITION, as one of their three required courses in translation.

A student may elect to major in both Greek and Latin (Classics) by completing the major requirements in one language and five courses above the elementary level in the other.

Major in Ancient Studies

Each student, after consultation with the Barnard Chair, chooses an advisor whose field is closely related to her own and with whom she will plan her senior essay.

A total of 36 points are required in the major, including at least four courses in one geographical area or period; courses in at least three departments to ensure proper interdisciplinary training and expertise; the elementary sequence of a relevant ancient language; the appropriate history course; ANCS UN3995 The Major Seminar, and at least the first semester of Ancient Studies ANCS UN3998 DIRCTD RSRCH-ANCIENT STUDIES I, ANCS V3999 Directed Research in Ancient Studies (senior essay). Ancient language courses may be used toward the major requirement; however, where a second ancient language is offered, one second-year sequence must be offered for a student to gain credit for the first year. As noted above, an annual list of the courses meeting the requirements for Ancient Studies in any particular year appears separately on the website.

Requirements for the Minors in Classics, Modern Greek, and Ancient Studies

Minor in Greek

The minor in Greek requires five courses in Greek at the 1200 level or above.

Minor in Latin

The minor in Latin requires five courses in Latin at the 1200 level or above.

Minor in Modern Greek

The Minor in Modern Greek requires five courses in Modern Greek at the 1200 level or above.  Modern Greek courses are taught entirely at Columbia.

Minor in Ancient Studies

The minor in Ancient Studies requires five courses that focus on the ancient Mediterranean world.  At least one course in ancient Mediterranean history is required. Interested students should consult the department and the Classics and Ancient Studies website on selecting a complementary and coherent set of courses for this minor.

Courses of Instruction

Ancient Studies

ANCS UN3996 THE MAJOR SEMINAR. 3.00 points.

Fall 2023: ANCS UN3996
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANCS 3996 001/11357 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
607 Hamilton Hall
Marcus Folch 3.00 5/15

ANCS UN3997 DIRCTD READING-ANCIENT STUDIES. 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: the director of undergraduate studies permission. Program of readings in some aspect of ancient studies, supervised by an appropriate faculty member chosen from the departments offering courses in the program in Ancient Studies. Evaluation by a series of essays, one long paper, or oral or written examination(s)

Fall 2023: ANCS UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANCS 3997 002/11358  
Deborah Steiner 3.00 0/5
ANCS 3997 004/11360  
Elizabeth Scharffenberger 3.00 0/5
ANCS 3997 005/11361  
Paraskevi Martzavou 3.00 0/5
ANCS 3997 006/11362  
Marcus Folch 3.00 0/5
ANCS 3997 007/11363  
John Ma 3.00 0/5
ANCS 3997 008/11364  
Seth Schwartz 3.00 0/5
ANCS 3997 009/11365  
Katharina Volk 3.00 0/5
Spring 2024: ANCS UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANCS 3997 001/12248  
Marcus Folch 3.00 0/5

ANCS UN3998 DIRCTD RSRCH-ANCIENT STUDIES I. 3.00 points.

Program of research in ancient studies under the direction of an advisor associated with the program, resulting in a research paper. Outline and bibliography must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies before credit will be awarded for ANCS V3995

Spring 2024: ANCS UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANCS 3998 001/12249  
Marcus Folch 3.00 1/5
ANCS 3998 011/16768  
Kathy Eden 3.00 0/5
ANCS 3998 012/00841  
Kristina Milnor 3.00 2/5

Classics

CLCV UN2441 EGYPT IN CLASSICAL WORLD. 4.00 points.

This class tracks Egypt’s entanglement in the Greco-Roman world from the country’s initial welcoming of Greek merchants and mercenaries to the point at which Justinian shuttered its last remaining temple. In examining archaeological, textual, and artistic evidence, we’ll pay close attention to the flashpoints that divided society along ethnic lines (viz. Egyptian, Nubian, Levantine, Greek, and Roman inhabitants) and according to religious belief (among polytheists of Egyptian and Greek heritage, Jewish Egyptians, and Christians) as well as to syncretism, mixed marriages, and other integrative aspects of society

CLCV BC3000 ETHNICITY, RACE, &POWER IN ANCT MEDITERR. 4.00 points.

Concepts of ethnicity and race – deeply complex and often fraught – are catalyzing forces in modern society. This seminar explores the changing definitions and resonances of these categories in ancient contexts. Course readings will cover a variety of societies but return repeatedly to Egypt and Nubia as a touchstone. Over the course of the semester, we will explore how Nubians and Egyptians viewed one another as well as how both Egyptians and Nubians experienced and were experienced by immigrants, colonizers, and travelers. Throughout the ancient Mediterranean, as we’ll see, self-definitions and cultural boundaries shifted radically according to changing power dynamics both within groups and between them. In seminar discussions, we’ll pose the following questions: How and when did groups who saw themselves as distinct from one another cooperate and intermarry? Define themselves in opposition to other groups or actively blur boundaries? Mobilize concepts of ethnicity or race to justify oppression? Engage in competition or resistance? Where, we will ask, did societies fracture and/or integrate? And what role did bicultural individuals play in cultural conversations and mediations? We will also seek to understand how our conceptions of ethnicity and race in the past are influenced not only by the biases of the present but by the methodologies we employ. In our discussions and investigations this semester we will learn a great deal about Northeast Africa in antiquity – but, so too, about ethnicity, concepts of race, and power throughout the ancient Mediterranean

Spring 2024: CLCV BC3000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLCV 3000 001/00564 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
306 Milbank Hall
Ellen Morris 4.00 14/15

CLCV BC3001 Mapping the Ancient Novel: Affordances, Precarities, and Predilections. 4.00 points.

This seminar explores the affordances and precarities of a variety of ancient landscapes and urban centers. So too it delves into the predilections of their inhabitants. At some point in the late first or second centuries CE, when the Eastern Mediterranean was under the authority of the Roman Empire, Greek writers and readers turned to escapist literature in which incredibly beautiful couples (predominantly heterosexual but also homosexual) met, fell and love, suffered setbacks, and ultimately… [no spoilers here]. While suffering the travails that separated them, they were often transported (by bandits, pirates, slave traders, armies, etc.) all across the Eastern Mediterranean. Over the semester, we will map these movements using the open-source geographical information system QGIS and discuss the choices that authors (and their characters) made, the cultural perceptions of settlements and their inhabitants, and the various affordances of different geographic regions (where bandits lurk, for example). We will also read and discuss material that will help us ascertain the degrees of fantasy vs. plausibility, not only in the mechanics of movement but in the religious and social practice of the protagonists

Spring 2024: CLCV BC3001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLCV 3001 001/00484 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
306 Milbank Hall
Ellen Morris 4.00 16/15

CLCV UN3059 WORLDS OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT. 3.00 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This seminar looks at the narrative and the historical context for an extraordinary event: the conquest of the Persian empire by Alexander III of Macedonia, conventionally known as “Alexander the Great”. We will explore the different worlds Alexander grew out of, confronted, and affected: the old Greek world, the Persian empire, the ancient near-east (Egypt, Levant, Babylonia, Iran), and the worlds beyond, namely pre-Islamic (and pre-Silk Road) Central Asia, the Afghan borderlands, and the Indus valley. The first part of the course will establish context, before laying out a narrative framework; the second part of the course will explore a series of themes, especially the tension between military conquest, political negotiation, and social interactions. Overall, the course will serve as an exercise in historical methodology (with particular attention to ancient sources and to interpretation), an introduction to the geography and the history of the ancient world (classical and near-eastern), and the exploration of a complex testcase located at the contact point between several worlds, and at a watershed of world history

CLLT UN3125 Book Histories and the Classics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: HUMA CC1001 or HUMA GS1001COCI CC1101 ,HUMA CC1001 or HUMA GS1001 or COCI CC1101

This seminar will introduce students of classical literature to the history of the Western book, and to the relationship between book history and the transmission and reception history of the literature of ancient Greece and Rome.  Students will also learn how to make use of rare books materials including manuscripts and early printed books......

CLLT V3132 Classical Myth. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Survey of major myths from the ancient Near East to the advent of Christianity, with emphasis upon the content and treatment of myths in classical authors (Homer, Hesiod, Aeschylus, Euripides, Sophocles, Vergil, Livy, Ovid).

CLCV BC3212 TOPICS IN ANCIENT DRAMA. 0.00-3.00 points.

This course is designed as an accompaniment to the Greek or Latin play that is put on by the Barnard and Columbia Ancient Drama Group each year, though it is open to any student interested in the aesthetics and politics of theater and drama. Course focus and some content will rotate year to year, calibrated to serve the play or plays chosen by the student director. We will read these and other relevant other plays or similarly adjacent texts, as well as scholarly literature on topics centered around the body in performance, including ancient theaters and stage space, costumes and masks, deportment and gestures, proxemics, and so on. We will also explore aspects of ancient drama and theatricality that relate to translation and reception, as well as inflections of gender and status. Other topics may include the mythic background (e.g., in epic and/or lyric), politics of aesthetics in ancient Athens, and gender-genre dynamics. Each component will extend over three or four classes and consider the ancient plays through readings of primary texts (in translation) and conceptual / contextual backgrounds. There will be an additional class hour for those who wish to read the play in the original language (signed up for as a 1-point directed reading)

Fall 2023: CLCV BC3212
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLCV 3212 001/00778 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
307 Milbank Hall
Nancy Worman 0.00-3.00 6/25

CLCV BC3333 Archaeology of Crisis: The Collapse of the Late Bronze Age in the Eastern Mediterranean World. 4.00 points.

In this immersive seminar, we’ll examine the “globalized” palace network that spanned the Eastern Mediterranean in the Late Bronze Age, paying especially close attention to the Mycenaean culture zone. We’ll think about the turmoil that resulted in the destruction or abandonment of all known palaces in the Eastern Mediterranean, follow the trail of some of the armed refugees that both fled from and caused yet more turmoil, and end up in Philistia, the new homeland of a subset of these migrants. In this region, now constituting the Gaza Strip and Southern Israel, we’ll witness competition, conflict, and cooperation in an ancient setting, as these newcomers selectively intermarried with locals, negotiated cultural and political boundaries, shifted alliances, created a political confederation, and eventually faded from view. Through readings, discussions, and short informal presentations, we’ll explore the methodologies by which archaeologists seek to gain a nuanced understanding of the past. We’ll also be closely attuned to how present challenges and crises spark new historical paradigms

Fall 2023: CLCV BC3333
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLCV 3333 001/00289 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
302 Milbank Hall
Ellen Morris 4.00 17/25

CLCV GU4025 ARISTOTLE'S POETICS AND GREEK POETRY. 3.00 points.

This course is designed as an upper-level seminar centered on a central text in the ancient and modern literary canon. The course does not require more than a passing familiarity with the Poetics or with Greek tragedy nor knowledge of Greek. In addition to reading and comparing various translations of the Poetics, we will look at scenes from Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannos and Euripides' Iphigeneia in Taurus, both of which were Aristotle's favorite exemplary tragedies, though for quite different reasons

Spring 2024: CLCV GU4025
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLCV 4025 001/00830 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
618 Hamilton Hall
Nancy Worman 3.00 13/15
CLCV 4025 AU1/18974 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Othr Other
Nancy Worman 3.00 3/3

CLCV GU4440 Society & Environment in the Ancient Mediterranean World. 4.00 points.

In this seminar we seek, quite literally, to map out the influence of environment on culture and history in the ancient Mediterranean. Students will learn to create custom maps in QGIS (a free and open-source cross-platform geographic information system application) that will engage with themes discussed in seminar. Areas of interest include the various ways in which different types of human societies (e.g., pastoralists, autonomous villages, cities, colonists, kingdoms, empires, and insurrectionists) have sought to exploit specific environmental niches for their own purposes. So, too, we’ll be attuned to the ways in which the natural world remained ungovernable and exerted its own agency via storms, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, diseases, droughts, floods, and fires. Some familiarity with either the premodern Mediterranean world or QGIS is recommended but not required

CLCV GU4110 Gender and Sexuality In Ancient Greece. 3 points.

Prerequisites: sophomore standing or the instructor's permission.

Examination of the ways in which gender and sexuality are constructed in ancient Greek society and represented in literature and art, with attention to scientific theory, ritual practice, and philosophical speculation. Topics include conceptions of the body, erotic and homoerotic literature and practice, legal constraints, pornography, rape, and prostitution.

CLPH GU4901 DIRECTED READINGS. 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.
Prerequisites: the instructors permission. Topics chosen in consultation between members of the staff and students

Fall 2023: CLPH GU4901
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLPH 4901 002/21151  
Lisa Mignone 3.00 1/5
CLPH 4901 004/20889  
Elizabeth Irwin 3.00 1/5
CLPH 4901 005/20847  
Ellen Morris 3.00 1/5
CLPH 4901 008/21159  
John Ma 3.00 2/5
CLPH 4901 009/20695  
Joseph Howley 3.00 1/5
CLPH 4901 011/15975  
Carmela Franklin 3.00 1/5
CLPH 4901 012/21106  
Lien Van Geel 3.00 4/5
CLPH 4901 013/00784  
Nancy Worman 3.00 2/25
Spring 2024: CLPH GU4901
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLPH 4901 002/20667  
Elizabeth Irwin 3.00 1
CLPH 4901 009/12251  
John Ma 3.00 0/5

 Greek

GREK UN1101 ELEMENTARY GREEK I. 4.00 points.

For students who have never studied Greek. An intensive study of grammar with reading and writing of simple Attic prose

Fall 2023: GREK UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 1101 001/11371 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
616 Hamilton Hall
Jose Antonio Cancino Alfaro 4.00 4/15
GREK 1101 002/11372 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
616 Hamilton Hall
Susan Rahyab 4.00 7/15

GREK UN1102 ELEMENTARY GREEK II. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: GREK UN1101 or the equivalent, or the instructor or the director of undergraduate studies' permission.
Prerequisites: GREK UN1101 or the equivalent, or the instructor or the director of undergraduate studies permission. Continuation of grammar study begun in GREK UN1101; selections from Attic prose

Spring 2024: GREK UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 1102 001/11460 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
616 Hamilton Hall
Melody Wauke 4.00 4/15
GREK 1102 002/11410 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
616 Hamilton Hall
Abigail Breuker 4.00 8/15

GREK UN1121 INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY GREEK. 4.00 points.

Covers all of Greek grammar and syntax in one term. Prepares the student to enter second-year Greek (GREK UN2101 or GREK UN2102)

Fall 2023: GREK UN1121
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 1121 001/11373 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Hanna Golab 4.00 15/15
GREK 1121 AU1/18961 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Othr Other
4.00 3/5
Spring 2024: GREK UN1121
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 1121 001/11411 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
616 Hamilton Hall
Elizabeth Irwin 4.00 10/15
GREK 1121 AU1/20580 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
Othr Other
Elizabeth Irwin 4.00 1/3

GREK UN2101 INTERMEDIATE GREEK: PROSE. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: GREK UN1101- GREK UN1102 or the equivalent.
Prerequisites: GREK UN1101- GREK UN1102 or the equivalent. Selections from Attic prose

Fall 2023: GREK UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 2101 001/11374 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Elizabeth Scharffenberger 4.00 15/18
GREK 2101 AU1/18987 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
Othr Other
Elizabeth Scharffenberger 4.00 1/5

GREK UN2102 INTERMEDIATE GREEK II: HOMER. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: GREK UN1101- GREK UN1102 or GREK UN1121 or the equivalent.
Prerequisites: GREK UN1101- GREK UN1102 or GREK UN1121 or the equivalent. Detailed grammatical and literary study of several books of the Iliad and introduction to the techniques or oral poetry, to the Homeric hexameter, and to the historical background of Homer

Spring 2024: GREK UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 2102 001/11412 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Hanna Golab 4.00 20/20

GREK UN3309 SELECTIONS FROM GREEK LIT. 3.00 points.

Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit. The topic that will be taught in Fall 2018 is Plato

Fall 2023: GREK UN3309
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3309 001/11375 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Elizabeth Irwin 3.00 6/25

GREK UN3310 GREEK LITERATURE SELECTIONS II. 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: GREK UN2101 - GREK UN2102 or the equivalent.
Prerequisites: GREK UN2101 - GREK UN2102 or the equivalent. Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit

Spring 2024: GREK UN3310
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3310 001/11413 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Hanna Golab 3.00 3/25

GREK UN3980 POST-BACCALAUREATE SEMINAR. 3.00 points.

This seminar aims to provide students in the post-baccalaureate certificate program with opportunities 1) to (re-)familiarize themselves with a selection of major texts from classical antiquity, which will be read in English, 2) to become acquainted with scholarship on these texts and with scholarly writing in general, 3) to write analytically about these texts and the interpretations posed about them in contemporary scholarship, and 4) to read in the original language selected passages of one of the texts in small tutorial groups, which will meet every week for an additional hour with members of the faculty

Fall 2023: GREK UN3980
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3980 001/11376 F 2:10pm - 4:00pm
618 Hamilton Hall
Darcy Krasne 3.00 3/15

GREK UN3996 THE MAJOR SEMINAR. 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: junior standing. Required for all majors in classics and classical studies. The topic changes from year to year, but is always broad enough to accommodate students in the languages as well as those in the interdisciplinary major. Past topics include: love, dining, slavery, space, power

Fall 2023: GREK UN3996
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3996 001/11377 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
607 Hamilton Hall
Marcus Folch 3.00 4/15

GREK UN3997 DIRECTED READINGS IN GREEK LIT. 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: the director of undergraduate studies permission. A program of reading in Greek literature, to be tested by a series of short papers, one long paper, or an oral or written examination

GREK UN3998 SUPERVISED RSRCH IN GREEK LIT. 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: the director of undergraduate studies permission. A program of research in Greek literature. Research paper required

Spring 2024: GREK UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3998 001/17054  
Elizabeth Irwin 3.00 2/5
GREK 3998 008/18547  
Kathy Eden 3.00 0/5

GREK GU4009 SELECTNS FROM GREEK LIT. 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: GREK V1201 and V1202, or their equivalent. Since the content of the course changes from year to year, it may be taken in consecutive years

Fall 2023: GREK GU4009
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 4009 001/11378 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Deborah Steiner 3.00 3/20

GREK GU4010 SELECTIONS FROM GREEK LIT. 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: GREK UN2101 - GREK UN2102 or the equivalent.
Prerequisites: GREK UN2101 - GREK UN2102 or the equivalent. Since the content of this course changes each year, it may be repeated for credit

Spring 2024: GREK GU4010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 4010 001/11414 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
607 Hamilton Hall
Marcus Folch 3.00 5/20

GREK GU4106 HISTORY OF GREEK LITERATURE II. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: at least two terms of Greek at the 3000-level or higher.
Prerequisites: at least two terms of Greek at the 3000-level or higher. Greek literature of the 4th century B.C. and of the Hellenistic and Imperial Ages

Spring 2024: GREK GU4106
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 4106 001/11415 T Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
616 Hamilton Hall
Elizabeth Scharffenberger 4.00 7/15

GREK GU4105 HISTORY OF GREEK LITERATURE I. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: at least two terms of Greek at the 3000-level or higher. Readings in Greek literature from Homer to the 4th century B.C

Fall 2023: GREK GU4105
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 4105 001/11379 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Elizabeth Irwin 4.00 7/25

Latin

LATN UN1101 ELEMENTARY LATIN I. 4.00 points.

For students who have never studied Latin. An intensive study of grammar with reading of simple prose and poetry

Fall 2023: LATN UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 1101 001/11381 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
609 Hamilton Hall
Carmela Franklin 4.00 13/18
LATN 1101 002/11382 M W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Lien Van Geel 4.00 8/15
LATN 1101 003/20893 M W 6:10pm - 8:15pm
327 Uris Hall
Erin Petrella 4.00 4/15
Spring 2024: LATN UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 1101 001/11418 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
509 Hamilton Hall
Geoffrey Harmsworth 4.00 15/15

LATN UN1102 ELEMENTARY LATIN II. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN1101.
Prerequisites: LATN UN1101. A continuation of LATN UN1101, including a review of grammar and syntax for students whose study of Latin has been interrupted

Fall 2023: LATN UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 1102 001/11383 T Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
616 Hamilton Hall
Hanna Golab 4.00 9/15
Spring 2024: LATN UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 1102 001/11419 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
316 Hamilton Hall
John Ma 4.00 12/18
LATN 1102 002/11420 M W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
315 Hamilton Hall
Erin Petrella 4.00 16/15

LATN UN1121 INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY LATIN. 4.00 points.

Fall 2023: LATN UN1121
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 1121 001/11384 M W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
607 Hamilton Hall
Geoffrey Harmsworth 4.00 11/15
Spring 2024: LATN UN1121
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 1121 001/11421 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
315 Hamilton Hall
Emma Ianni 4.00 11/15

LATN UN2101 INTERMEDIATE LATIN I. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN1101-UN1102, or LATN UN1121, or the equivalent.
Prerequisites: LATN UN2101 or the equivalent. Selections from Ovids Metamorphoses and from Sallust, Livy, Seneca, or Pliny

Fall 2023: LATN UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 2101 001/11385 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
607 Hamilton Hall
Lien Van Geel 4.00 9/18
LATN 2101 002/11386 M W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
313 Hamilton Hall
Melody Wauke 4.00 10/15
Spring 2024: LATN UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 2101 001/11422 M W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Jose Antonio Cancino Alfaro 4.00 14/15

LATN UN2102 INTERMEDIATE LATIN II. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN2101 or the equivalent.
This course condenses the second semester of Intermediate Latin (2102) into a sixweek summer session. Its goal is to further develop reading and interpretation skills in Classical Latin through engagement with Roman authors while continuing to review the essentials of Latin grammar. In the first half of the course, we cover selections from Ovid’s epic poem, the Metamorphoses; in the second, we take up the prose writings of Seneca the Younger including selections from his Epistulae Morales and the philosophical dialogue De vita beata. Prerequisites: LATN UN2101 or the equivalent. Selections from Ovids Metamorphoses and from Sallust, Livy, Seneca, or Pliny

Fall 2023: LATN UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 2102 003/11387 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Erin Petrella 4.00 14/15
Spring 2024: LATN UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 2102 001/11423 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
318 Hamilton Hall
Lien Van Geel 4.00 9/18
LATN 2102 002/11424 M W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
316 Hamilton Hall
Hanna Golab 4.00 8/15
LATN 2102 AU1/18968 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
Othr Other
Lien Van Geel 4.00 2/3

LATN UN3012 AUGUSTAN POETRY. 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN2102 or the equivalent.
Prerequisites: LATN UN2102 or the equivalent. Selections from Vergil and Horace. Combines literary analysis with work in grammar and metrics

Fall 2023: LATN UN3012
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3012 001/12682 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
304 Hamilton Hall
Lien Van Geel 3.00 9/30
LATN 3012 AU1/18993 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Othr Other
Lien Van Geel 3.00 1/5

LATN UN3033 MEDIEVAL LANGUAGE & LITERATURE. 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: four semesters of college Latin or the instructor's permission.
Prerequisites: four semesters of college Latin or the instructors permission. This course offers an introduction to medieval Latin literature in conversation with its two most important traditions, classical literature and early Christian culture. Illustrative passages from the principal authors and genres of the Latin Middle Ages will be read, including Augustine and biblical exegesis; Ambrose and poetry; Bede and history and hagiography; Abelard and Heloise and the 12th century Renaissance. The course is suitable both for students of Latin and of the Middle Ages

Fall 2023: LATN UN3033
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3033 001/11388 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
507 Hamilton Hall
Carmela Franklin 3.00 10/25

LATN UN3035 Poetry as Neurosis: Lucan’s Bellum Civile. 3 points.

This course is an intensive study of Lucan’s revolutionary and enigmatic Bellum Civile, the epic masterpiece of the Neronian age, which was admired and imitated all through the history of Western culture by authors such as Dante, Montaigne, Milton, Voltaire, Goethe, Shelley, and Baudelaire among others. The course will examine major controversies concerning the form and meaning of the poem, with special emphasis on the poetic tension created by the narrator’s neurotic personality. The narration of the 49 BCE civil war between Caesar and Pompey is for Lucan the pretext for an original and intensely personal reflection on themes such as political oppression, the role of the individual in society, nihilism, self-destructiveness, mental disorder, and artistic creation. The poem will be analyzed from various critical perspectives that include rhetoric, intertextuality, deconstruction, reception theory, and psychoanalysis; no previous knowledge of any of these methodologies is required. Although an acceptable knowledge of Latin (intermediate or above) is assumed, the primary focus of this course is literary and sociological interpretation rather than linguistic competence. In addition to the Latin reading assignments, the poem will also be read entirely in English translation, allowing students to comprehend the whole while they engage with particular sections in the original language. The assignment for each class will include: (1) approximately five hundred lines to be read in English translation; (2) translation of short Latin passages, whose size may be adapted to the level of the class/student; (3) secondary readings.

LATN UN3309 LATIN LITERATURE SELECTIONS. 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN2102 or the equivalent.
Prerequisites: LATN UN2102 or the equivalent. Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit

Fall 2023: LATN UN3309
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3309 001/11389 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
825 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Darcy Krasne 3.00 9/30

LATN UN3310 LATIN LITERATURE SELECTIONS. 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN2102 or the equivalent.
Prerequisites: LATN UN2102 or the equivalent. Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit

Spring 2024: LATN UN3310
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3310 001/11426 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
318 Hamilton Hall
Darcy Krasne 3.00 11/25

LATN UN3980 POST-BACCALAUREATE SEMINAR. 3.00 points.

This seminar aims to provide students in the post-baccalaureate certificate program with opportunities 1) to (re-)familiarize themselves with a selection of major texts from classical antiquity, which will be read in English, 2) to become acquainted with scholarship on these texts and with scholarly writing in general, 3) to write analytically about these texts and the interpretations posed about them in contemporary scholarship, and 4) to read in the original language selected passages of one of the texts in small tutorial groups, which will meet every week for an additional hour with members of the faculty

Fall 2023: LATN UN3980
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3980 001/11390 F 2:10pm - 4:00pm
618 Hamilton Hall
Darcy Krasne 3.00 5/15

LATN UN3996 THE MAJOR SEMINAR. 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: junior standing. Required for all majors in Classics and Classical Studies. The topic changes from year to year but is always broad enough to accommodate students in the languages as well as those in the interdisciplinary major. Past topics include: love, dining, slavery, space, power

Fall 2023: LATN UN3996
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3996 001/11391 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
607 Hamilton Hall
Marcus Folch 3.00 6/15

LATN UN3997 DIRECTED READINGS IN LATIN LIT. 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: the director of undergraduate studies permission. A program of reading in Latin literature, to be tested by a series of short papers, one long paper, or an oral or written examination

Fall 2023: LATN UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3997 003/15973  
Carmela Franklin 3.00 0/5

LATN UN3998 SUPERVISED RSRCH IN LATIN LIT. 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: the director of undergraduate studies permission. A program of research in Latin literature. Research paper required

Spring 2024: LATN UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3998 002/18659  
Gareth Williams 3.00 1/5
LATN 3998 003/20369  
Carmela Franklin 3.00 1/5
LATN 3998 007/18707  
Joseph Howley 3.00 1/5
LATN 3998 010/00839  
Kristina Milnor 3.00 3/5
LATN 3998 011/00849  
Nancy Worman 3.00 1/5

LATN GU4009 LATIN LIT PROSE SELECTIONS. 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: LATN V3012 or the equivalent.
Prerequisites: LATN V3012 or the equivalent. Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit

Fall 2023: LATN GU4009
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 4009 001/11392 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Gareth Williams 3.00 8/20

LATN GU4010 SELECTIONS FROM LATIN LITERATURE. 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN3012 or the equivalent.
Prerequisites: LATN UN3012 or the equivalent. Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit

Spring 2024: LATN GU4010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 4010 001/11427 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Gareth Williams 3.00 17/20
LATN 4010 AU1/18970 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Othr Other
Gareth Williams 3.00 3/3

LATN GU4105 LAT LITERATURE OF THE REPUBLIC. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: at least two terms of Latin at the 3000-level or higher. Latin literature from the beginning to early Augustan times

Fall 2023: LATN GU4105
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 4105 001/11393 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
618 Hamilton Hall
Katharina Volk 4.00 8/20

LATN GU4106 HISTORY OF LATIN LIT II. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: at least two terms of Latin at the 3000-level or higher.
Prerequisites: at least two terms of Latin at the 3000-level or higher. Latin literature from Augustus to 600 C.E

Spring 2024: LATN GU4106
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 4106 001/11428 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Gareth Williams 4.00 10/20
LATN 4106 AU1/18971 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Othr Other
Gareth Williams 4.00 3/3

LATN GU4152 MEDIEVAL LATIN LITERATURE. 3.00 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.
Prerequisites: the instructors permission. This course covers various topics in Medieval Latin Literature

Spring 2024: LATN GU4152
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 4152 001/11429 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
609 Hamilton Hall
Carmela Franklin 3.00 4/15
LATN 4152 AU1/18972 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Othr Other
Carmela Franklin 3.00 2/3