Advising Appointments

Current students as well as prospective students with questions about our courses and programs of study are encouraged to meet with our full-time faculty members. Faculty advising appointments are open to anyone who is interested in learning more about our department. During the summer break, all current and prospective students are instead invited to submit their questions by email to architecture@barnard.edu.

Full-Time Faculty

Professors of Professional Practice:
Karen Fairbanks (Chair)
Kadambari Baxi

Assistant Professors:
Anooradha Iyer Siddiqi
Ignacio G. Galán
Ralph Ghoche
Nick Smith

Adjunct Faculty

Adjunct Professors:
Joeb Moore
Madeline Schwartzman
Suzanne Stephens

Adjunct Assistant Professors:
Diana Cristobal 
Eliana Dotan
Julian Harake
Lindsay Harkema
Joeb Moore
Ivan Munuera
Ana Ozaki
Galen Pardee
Bart-Jan Polman
Todd Rouhe
Michael Schissel
Suzanne Stephens
Katie Shima
Fred Tang
Irina Verona
 

Our Programs of Study

THE MAJOR IN ARCHITECTURE
THE MAJOR IN THE HISTORY AND THEORY OF ARCHITECTURE
THE MINOR IN ARCHITECTURE


The Major in Architecture

The major in architecture is open to Barnard College students, Columbia College students, and General Studies students. The required classes are broken down into four categories: studio, lectures seminars and workshops, senior courses, and the specialization:

Studio Courses
Four studio courses, to be taken one per semester (studio courses have limited enrollment and priority is given to Architecture majors):
ARCH UN2101ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN: SYSTEMS AND MATERIALS
ARCH UN2103ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN: ENVIRONMENTS AND MEDIATIONS
ARCH UN3201Architectural Design, I
ARCH UN3202
Lecture, Seminar, and Workshop Courses *
Five courses following the distribution requirement below:
ARCH UN3117
Architectural Elective: History
Architectural Elective: Society, Environment, and the Global
Architectural Elective: Design, Media, and Technology
Architectural Elective
Senior Courses *
ARCH UN3901Senior Seminar
Elective Architecture seminar (another Senior Seminar in the Department, Advanced Architectural Research and Design, or Independent Research)
Specialization Courses
All majors are asked to complement their work with a thematic unit (three courses) called the "specialization." Each student develops a specific specialization that broadens their architectural studies in one of the following areas or combination of areas: History, Society, Environment, Global, Design, Media, and Technology. Courses may be taken from across various departments. All majors, in consultation with their advisers, will develop a short (100 word) description of their specialization and advisers will approve their course selections. Students can request and develop other areas of specialization with adviser approval.
Graduation Requirements
The major also requires that students submit a portfolio and a writing sample before graduation. The design portfolio includes representative work from all design studios and the writing sample is a paper or essay from a senior level architecture or architecture-related course. Final submissions are archived in the department, the portfolios are displayed at the end of the year show, and both are used to award graduation honors.
*

These are courses offered by the architecture department or other applicable departments offered within the University. Students should consult the program office for a list of applicable courses each semester.


The Major in the History and Theory of Architecture

The History and Theory of Architecture major stresses research and writing in Architectural History. This program of study is only open to Barnard College students; Columbia College and General Studies students that are interested in majoring in architectural history should contact the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University.  The History and Theory of Architecture major requires a total of 14 courses, distributed as follows:

Studio Courses
1-2 studio courses, to be taken one per semester:
ARCH UN1020Introduction To Architectural Design and Visual Culture
ARCH UN2101ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN: SYSTEMS AND MATERIALS
ARCH UN2103ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN: ENVIRONMENTS AND MEDIATIONS
Lecture, Seminar, and Workshop Courses
7-8 lecture, seminar, and workshop courses:
ARCH UN3117
Architectural Elective: History
Architectural Elective: Society, Environment, and the Global
Architectural Elective: Design, Media, and Technology
3 to 4 Architectural Electives - any lecture, seminar, or workshop offered by the Architecture Department or an approved course from a related department
*Note: Studios, Lectures, Seminars, and Workshops must total to 9 courses
Specialization
3 courses for the specialization:
Each student develops a specialization that broadens the reach of their architectural studies and supports their thesis. All majors, in consultation with their advisers, will develop a short (100 word) description of their specialization and advisers will approve their course selections.
Senior Courses
2 courses for the senior course requirement:
ARCH UN3901Senior Seminar
ARCH UN3998Independent Study
All senior History and Theory of Architecture majors are required to enroll in one semester of Senior Seminar and to write a thesis which can be done through enrolling in Independent Study (ARCH UN3997 or ARCH UN3998). Please consult with your major adviser for planning your thesis.

The Minor in Architecture

The minor in architecture is only open to Barnard College students and SEAS students at Columbia University. The minor in architecture requires a total of five courses, distributed as follows:

Studio Courses
1-3 of the following courses:
ARCH UN1020Introduction To Architectural Design and Visual Culture
Three history/theory courses
ARCH UN2101ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN: SYSTEMS AND MATERIALS
ARCH UN2103ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN: ENVIRONMENTS AND MEDIATIONS
Lecture, Seminar, and Workshop Courses
ARCH UN3117 is required along with 1-3 Architectural Electives - any lecture, seminar, or workshop offered by the Architecture Department or an approved course from a related department.
ARCH UN3117

Academic Year 2022-2023 Courses

Most architecture courses have a restriction on online enrollment (meaning that you will automatically appear on the wait list when you try to register online) and require an application in order to be admitted. Links to our applications are available on our website. For a complete list of courses across the university that have been approved to fulfill various architecture major and minor requirements, please refer to our program planning list. You are welcome to contact us with any questions you may have: architecture@barnard.edu.



Fall 2022 Courses


ARCH UN1020 Introduction To Architectural Design and Visual Culture. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Corequisites: Intended for the non-major, sophomore year and above. Enrollment limited to 18 students.

Introductory design studio to introduce students to architectural design through readings and studio design projects. Intended to develop analytic skills to critique existing media and spaces. Process of analysis used as a generative tool for the students' own design work. Attendance is mandatory at the first class meeting in order to form class registration lists.

ARCH UN2101 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN: SYSTEMS AND MATERIALS. 4 points.

This architectural design studio explores material assemblies, techniques of fabrication, and systems of organization. These explorations will be understood as catalysts for architectural analysis and design experimentation.


Both designed objects and the very act of making are always embedded within a culture, as they reflect changing material preferences, diverse approaches to durability and obsolescence, varied understandings of comfort, different concerns with economy and ecology. They depend on multiple resources and mobilize varied technological innovations. Consequently, we will consider that making always involves making a society, for it constitutes a response to its values and a position regarding its technical and material resources. Within this understanding, this studio will consider different cultures of making through a number of exercises rehearse design operations at different scales—from objects to infrastructures.

ARCH UN2103 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN: ENVIRONMENTS AND MEDIATIONS. 4 points.

This architectural design studio course explores modes of visualization, technologies of mediation and environmental transformations. These explorations will be used as catalysts for architectural analysis and design experimentation.

Introducing design methodologies that allow us to see and to shape environmental interactions in new ways, the studio will focus on how architecture may operate as a mediator – an intermediary that negotiates, alters or redirects multiple forces in our world: physical, cultural, social, technological, political etc. The semester will progress through three projects that examine unique atmospheric, spatial and urban conditions with the aid of multimedia visual techniques; and that employ design to develop creative interventions at the scales of an interface, space and city.

ARCH UN3120 CITY,LANDSCAPE, & ECOLOGY. 3.00 points.

City, Landscape, Ecology is a thematically driven course that centers on issues and polemics related to landscape, land settlement and ecology over the past two centuries. The course interrogates our changing attitudes to nature from the 18th century to the present, focusing on the artistic and architectural responses to these perceptions. It aims to demonstrate the important role that artists and architects have played, and are to play, in making visible the sources of environmental degradation and in the development of new means of mitigating anthropogenic ecological change. City, Landscape, Ecology is divided into three parts. Part I explores important episodes in the history of landscape: picturesque garden theory, notions of “wilderness” as epitomized in national and state parks in the United States, Modern and Postmodern garden practices, and the prevalence of landscape in the work of artists from the 1960s to the present. The purpose here is to better understand the role that territorial organization plays in the construction of social practices, human subjectivities, and technologies of power. We then turn to ecology and related issues of climate, urbanization and sustainability in Part II. Here we will look at the rise of ecological thinking in the 1960s; approaches to the environment that were based on the systems-thinking approach of the era. In the session “Capitalism, Race and Population Growth” we examine the history of the “crisis” of scarcity from Thomas Robert Malthus, to Paul R. Ehrlich (The Population Bomb, 1968) to today and look at questions of environmental racism, violence and equity. The course concludes with Part III (Hybrid Natures). At this important juncture in the course, we will ask what is to be done today. We’ll examine the work of contemporary theorists, architects, landscape architects, policy makers and environmentalists who have channeled some of the lessons of the past in proposing lasting solutions to our land management and ecological crises of the present and future

ARCH UN3201 Architectural Design, I. 4.5 points.

Prerequisites: ARCH V3101 and ARCH V3103. Open to architecture majors or with permission of instructor.

Introduction to architectural design taught in a studio environment, through a series of design projects requiring drawings and models. Field trips, lectures, and discussions are organized in relation to studio exercises. Portfolio of design work from Architectural Representation: Abstraction and Perception will be reviewed the first week of classes.

ARCH UN3211 Architectural Design, III. 4.5 points.

Prerequisites: ARCH V3202 and permission of the department chair. Enrollment limited as space permits.

Further exploration of the design process through studio work. Programs of considerable functional, contextual, and conceptual complexity are undertaken. Portfolio required for review first day of fall semester or earlier, as requested by the department. Class list based on portfolio review will be formed by first class meeting.

ARCH UN3312 Special Topics In Architecture. 3 points.

Topics vary yearly. Course may be repeated for credit.  Attendance is mandatory at the first class meeting in order to form class registration lists.

ARCH UN3901 Senior Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students per section. Open to architecture majors only unless space permits.

Readings, individual class presentations, and written reports. Attendance is mandatory at the first class meeting in order to form class registration lists.

ARCH UN3997 INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1.00-4.00 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of the program director in term prior to that of independent study. Independent study form available at departmental office

ARCH GU4300 The Just City: Global Debates in Urban Planning and Policy. 4.00 points.

Urbanization is inherently unequal, inscribing social, economic, environmental, and political unevenness into the spatial fabric of the city. But the distribution of such inequality is not inevitable. Urbanization is a product of the collective decisions we make (or choose not to make) in response to the shared challenges we face in our cities. And, thus, the patterns of urbanization can be changed. This is the task of urban planning and the starting point for this advanced seminar, which asks how we can reshape our cities to be more just—to alleviate inequality rather than compound it. In embarking on this effort, we face numerous “wicked” problems without clear-cut solutions. The approaches one takes in addressing urban inequality are therefore fundamentally normative—they are shaped by one’s place in the world and one’s view of it. The central challenge in addressing inequality is thus establishing a basis for collective action amongst diverse actors with differing—and sometimes conflicting—values and views. In other words, planning the just city a matter of both empathy and debate. In this course, we will endeavor to develop informed positions that can help us engage with others as a basis for taking collective action. The course is organized into four 3-week modules, each of which addresses a dimension of the just city: equity, democracy, diversity, and sustainability. In the first week of each module, we will discuss how the issue has been understood in history and theory (with an emphasis on tradeoffs between different priorities and values); in the second week, we will apply this discussion to a global case study prepared and presented by a team of students; and in the third week, we will hold an in-class debate to determine what should be done. Specific case studies vary each year





Spring 2023 Courses

The course schedule listed below may be subject to change. Please revisit this page and the online Directory of Classes to confirm our spring course information. You are also welcome to contact us with any questions you may have: architecture@barnard.edu.


ARCH UN1020 Introduction To Architectural Design and Visual Culture. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Corequisites: Intended for the non-major, sophomore year and above. Enrollment limited to 18 students.

Introductory design studio to introduce students to architectural design through readings and studio design projects. Intended to develop analytic skills to critique existing media and spaces. Process of analysis used as a generative tool for the students' own design work. Attendance is mandatory at the first class meeting in order to form class registration lists.

ARCH UN2101 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN: SYSTEMS AND MATERIALS. 4 points.

This architectural design studio explores material assemblies, techniques of fabrication, and systems of organization. These explorations will be understood as catalysts for architectural analysis and design experimentation.


Both designed objects and the very act of making are always embedded within a culture, as they reflect changing material preferences, diverse approaches to durability and obsolescence, varied understandings of comfort, different concerns with economy and ecology. They depend on multiple resources and mobilize varied technological innovations. Consequently, we will consider that making always involves making a society, for it constitutes a response to its values and a position regarding its technical and material resources. Within this understanding, this studio will consider different cultures of making through a number of exercises rehearse design operations at different scales—from objects to infrastructures.

ARCH UN2103 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN: ENVIRONMENTS AND MEDIATIONS. 4 points.

This architectural design studio course explores modes of visualization, technologies of mediation and environmental transformations. These explorations will be used as catalysts for architectural analysis and design experimentation.

Introducing design methodologies that allow us to see and to shape environmental interactions in new ways, the studio will focus on how architecture may operate as a mediator – an intermediary that negotiates, alters or redirects multiple forces in our world: physical, cultural, social, technological, political etc. The semester will progress through three projects that examine unique atmospheric, spatial and urban conditions with the aid of multimedia visual techniques; and that employ design to develop creative interventions at the scales of an interface, space and city.

ARCH UN3312 Special Topics In Architecture. 3 points.

Topics vary yearly. Course may be repeated for credit.  Attendance is mandatory at the first class meeting in order to form class registration lists.

ARCH UN3901 Senior Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students per section. Open to architecture majors only unless space permits.

Readings, individual class presentations, and written reports. Attendance is mandatory at the first class meeting in order to form class registration lists.