Co-Chairs: Martin Stute (Professor), Brian Mailloux (Professor)
Assistant Professors:  Logan Brenner, Elizabeth Cook
Senior Lecturers: Peter Bower, Terryanne Maenza-Gmelch (Laboratory Director)
Lecturer: Sedelia Rodriguez (Laboratory Instructor)
Adjunct Professors: Elena Dana Neascu, Christian Braneon, Cynthia Rosenzweig, Jenna Lawrence
 

Environmental Science Major

Environmental Science provides a scientific basis for management of earth systems. It focuses on the interaction between human activities, resources, and the environment. As human population grows and technology advances, pressures on earth's natural systems are becoming increasingly intense and complex. Environmental Science is an exciting field where science is used to best serve society.

Requirements for the Environmental Science Major


For requirement details, see Environmental Science Major Worksheet, on the Environmental Science Major page

Part A
The following four courses with labs:
EESC UN21004.5
EESC UN22004.5
CHEM BC2001undefined
BIOL BC1500
 - BIOL BC1501

and
0
or EESC UN2300
*Students may NOT receive credit for BOTH BIOL BC1500, 1501 AND EESC UN2300.
Part B
Select two courses:
CHEM BC32303
CHEM BC3328
(recommended)
CHEM BC20025
CHEM BC32313
BIOL BC15023
BIOL BC1503
(recommended)
PHYS V12013
PHYS V12023
PHYS BC20014.5
PHYS BC20024.5
PHYS BC30015
Part C
Select two courses in calculus, statistics, data analysis, and/or economics
MATH UN1101 (or other Calculus class)3
MATH UN1102 (or other Calculus class)3
EESC BC3017 (or other statistical or data analysis class)3
ECON BC10033
or ECON UN1105
Part D
Select four electives courses. For details, see Environmental Science Major Worksheet on the departmental website (link above).
Part E
EESC BC3800
 - EESC BC3801

and (provide credit for the senior thesis)
0

Advice for the Environmental Science Major

Adviser: Co-Chair, Brian Mailloux
Students with a strong science background who are interested in majoring in Environmental Science are advised to take EESC UN2100 early on, followed by EESC UN2200 . These two courses are required for all Environmental Science majors.

If you are interested in exploring Environmental Science or are concerned about your science background, you could take EESC BC1001 in the fall. In the spring, you can shift into the major sequence of EESC UN2100 .

EESC BC1001 may be taken as a major elective*, however, the course must be completed prior to taking EESC UN2100, UN2200 or UN2300.

We recommend that Environmental Science majors take CHEM BC2001 and BIOL BC1500 ,  plus the corresponding lab, BIOL BC1501 , early in their academic career at Barnard in order to prepare for upper level courses with prerequisites. Students with concerns about their science preparation should not take both at the same time. If you want advice on taking an Introductory Biology course, visit Biology, and for advice on taking an Introductory Physics course, visit Physics.

Students should check the catalogue and the department for additional information on the major, minor and courses offered by Barnard and Columbia. Classes with grades less than C- or taken pass/fail can not be counted towards the major.  The minimum number of course points for the Environmental Science Major is 48.5 points.

See also Senior Research Seminar for information on senior thesis requirements.

Requirements for the Environmental Science Minor

Students wishing to minor in Environmental Science should have a plan approved by the Environmental Science Department Minor Advisor, Sedelia Rodriguez by the end of their junior year.

5 courses are required, meeting the following criteria:

  • At least 3 of the 5 courses taken at Barnard/Columbia
  • 1 laboratory science course
  • 4 electives
    • 3 credits per course or higher
    • 3 courses at 3000 level or above
    • At least 2 courses based in the natural sciences

Elective courses listed below may be substituted only with the approval of the Minor Advisor and complete an Environmental Science Minor Worksheet. Please note that many of the courses below are not offered every year:

Select one laboratory science course (with corresponding labs) from the following:9
EESC BC10014.5
EESC UN10114
EESC UN21004.5
EESC UN22004.5
EESC UN2300 (students must enroll in the corresponding LAB course, EESC UN2310.)4.5
Select at least two Natural Science Electives:
BIOL BC22723
BIOL BC33203
EAEE E20023
EEEB UN30873
EESC BC30013
EESC BC30123
EESC BC30133
EESC BC30143
EESC BC30163
EESC BC30173
EESC BC30214
EESC BC30233
EESC BC30253
EESC BC30263
EESC BC30324
EESC BC30333
EESC BC30433
EESC BC30503
EESC UN16003
EESC UN23303
PUBH UN31003
SDEV UN33903
SDEV UN34503
URBS UN32004
Minors in Environmental Science are required to complete five courses, each of which should be three credits or above, and at least three of the five courses must be taken at Barnard/Columbia. Of the four electives, two courses must be based in the natural sciences and three courses must be at 3000 level or above. (For Electives for the Environmental Science Minor, please see link for Minor Requirements Worksheet above. Any substitutions must have the approval of the Minor Advisor. )9


Students wishing to minor in Environmental Science who are interested in field programs and seek minor credit must contact Sedelia Rodriguez. The only current field program within Columbia University is SEE-U.

There is currently no minor in Environmental Biology or Environment and Sustainability.

Environment and Sustainability Major

Sustainability is a growing field focusing on finding solutions in an ever-changing environment.  Majors develop an understanding of the processes and stresses of earth's systems, handle environmental data and make reasoned assessments, and engage in collaborative and interdisciplinary work required for developing approaches to maintain a sustainable environment.

The Environment and Sustainability major is designed to equip students to play effective roles as citizens or career professionals who can actively engage in environmental decision-making and policy in a rapidly changing environment. Majors learn to analyze and evaluate environmental, political, and economic systems and public policies in the context of environmental concerns, and to use these interdisciplinary skills to navigate development with the environment in mind. The major begins with foundations in the natural sciences, social sciences, and quantitative analysis, followed by upper level electives in both the natural and social sciences, as is a required hands-on, client-based collaborative workshop at the junior level is required.  Many exciting opportunities for student research exist on this campus and in the greater metropolitan community.

Environment and Sustainability as did Policy graduates will go on to a variety of careers, including national and international environmental policy, law, economics, journalism, business, public administration, government agencies, corporations, multilateral institutions, nongovernmental organizations, academia, and consulting firms. There is no minor in Environment and Sustainability. 

Requirements for the Environment and Sustainability Major

 For requirement details, see Environment and Sustainability Major Requirement Worksheet, envsustworksheet.doc on the Environment and Sustainability page.

Part A-1. Natural Science Foundation (all 3 required)
EESC UN21004.5
CHEM BC2001 (plus Lab)5
or EESC BC3016
. . . * Majors can replace General Chemistry with EESC BC3016, Environmental Measurements, but must complement this with either an A-2 or a B-2 course, not also being used for those requirements.
BIOL BC1500
 - BIOL BC1501

and
5
or EEEB UN2002
or EESC UN2300
or Columbia's SEE-U summer Program (only for those who did not receive credit for EESC BC1001)
Part A-2. Additional Science Foundation Course (choose 1)
CHEM BC32303
CHEM BC20025
EESC UN22004.5
BIOL BC1502
 - BIOL BC1503

and
5
EESC BC10014.5
EESC UN10114
Part B. Quantitative Foundations (1 from each grouping, choose 2 total)
EESC BC3017 (AND )3
SDEV UN33903
or SDEV UN3450
or EAEE E4009
or EESC BC3016
or EESC BC3050
or EESC GU4050
or URBS UN3200
Part C. Social Science Foundation (choose 2)
ECON BC10033
or ECON UN1105
POLS UN16014
SDEV UN23003
SDEV UN23203
ANTH UN10023
Part D. Electives (choose 3, at least 1 from each grouping of upper level courses) D1. Natural Science Elective (See Worksheet for full list of courses)
D2. Social Science Elective (See Worksheet for full list of courses)
Part E. Workshop Experience
EESC BC33004
Part F. Senior Research/Thesis (2 courses)
EESC BC38003
EESC BC38013

Advice for the Environment and Sustainability Major

Advisers: Co-Chair, Martin Stute
Because this Major was approved by the Faculty in Fall 2017 as a updated replacement for the Environmental Policy, any student may elect the Environment and Sustainability major, but only students in the Class of 2019 or 2018 can graduate with a major in Environmental Policy because it is being phased out.

Students with a strong science background who are interested in majoring in Environment and Sustainability are advised to take Earth's Environmental Systems: Climate (EESC UN2100 ).

If you are interested in exploring Environment and Sustainability or are concerned about your science background, you could take EESC BC1001 in the fall. In the spring, you would need to find another introductory level Environmental Science course such as EESC UN1011, Earth, Origin, Evolution, Processes, Future (with Lab) or shift into the major sequence of EESC UN2100 which is a Natural Science Foundation course. Please also note the following:
For the second Natural Science Foundation course requirement can be fulfilled by Majors in Environment and Sustainability with either CHEM BC2001, General Chemistry or EESC BC3016x, Environmental Measurements along with either another Additional Science Foundations Course  or a Quantitative Foundations Analysis/Skills course.  There are a few options to fulfill the 3rd Natural Foundation course requirements, so see above or the Environment and Sustainability Major Requirement Worksheet, envsustworksheet.doc for more specifics.

We recommend that Environment and Sustainability majors take CHEM BC2001 and BIOL BC1500 plus the corresponding lab, BIOL BC1501 , early in their academic career at Barnard in order to prepare for upper level courses with prerequisites, but it is not recommended that they be taken concurrently. Students with concerns about their science preparation should realize the option of taking EESC BC2016, Environmental Measurements (plus the additional course). If you want advice on taking an Introductory Biology course, visit Biology, and for advice on taking an Introductory Physics course, visit Physics.

Students should check the catalogue and the department for additional information on the major, minor and courses offered by Barnard and Columbia. Classes with grades less than C- or taken pass/fail can not be counted towards the major. The minimum number of course points for the Environment and Sustainability Major is 47.5 points.

See also Senior Research Seminar for information on senior thesis requirements.

Part A-1. Natural Science Foundation (3 courses with corresponding labs)
EESC UN21004.5
CHEM BC2001 (plus Lab)5
BIOL BC1500
 - BIOL BC1501

and
5
or EEEB UN2002
or EESC UN2300
or Columbia's SEE-U summer Program (only for those who did not receive credit for EESC BC1001)
Part A-2. Additional Science Foundation Course (1 course with corresponding lab)
CHEM BC32303
or CHEM BC2002
or EESC UN2200
or BIOL BC1502
or EESC BC1001
or EESC BC1002
Part B. Quantitative Assessment (2 courses)
EESC BC30173
SDEV UN33903
or SDEV UN3450
or EAEE E4009
or EESC BC3016
or EESC GU4050
or URBS UN3200
Part C. Decision-making Foundation (one for each grouping, 3 courses total)
ECON BC10033
or ECON UN1105
ANTH UN1002 (with discussion section)3
or EEEB UN1010
or ANTH V3004
or SDEV UN2300
Part D. Natural Science Elective (1 course) See link for Environmental Policy Major Worksheet above.
Part E. Social Science Elective (1 course) See link for Environmental Policy Major Worksheet above.
Part F. Junior Research (1 course) See link for Environmental Policy Major Worksheet above.
EESC BC3300 (recommended)4
Part G. Senior Research/Thesis (2 courses)
EESC BC38003
EESC BC38013

Advisers: Martin Stute (Environmental Science Department), Kimberly Marten (Political Science), Alan Dye (Economics), Paige West (Anthropology), David Weiman (Urban Studies).

Students with a strong science background who are interested in majoring in Environmental Policy are advised to take Earth's Environmental Systems: Climate (EESC UN2100 ).

If you are interested in exploring Environmental Policy or are concerned about your science background, you could take EESC BC1001 in the fall.In the spring, you would need to find another introductory level Environmental Science course such as EESC UN1011 Earth, Origin, Evolution, Processes, Future (with Lab) or shift into the major sequence of EESC V2100 which is a Natural Science Foundation course.  Please also note the following:

EESC BC1001 must be taken prior to taking EESC UN2100, UN2200 or UN2300.

We recommend that Environmental Policy majors take CHEM BC2001 and BIOL BC1500 plus the corresponding lab, BIOL BC1501 , early in their academic career at Barnard in order to prepare for upper level courses with prerequisites. Students with concerns about their science preparation should not take both at the same time. If you want advice on taking an Introductory Biology course, visit Biology, and for advice on taking an Introductory Physics course, visit Physics.

Students should check the catalogue and the department for additional information on the major, minor and courses offered by Barnard and Columbia. Classes with grades less than C- or taken pass/fail can not be counted towards the major.

See also Senior Research Seminar for information on senior thesis requirements.

Cross-Listed Courses

There are no cross-listed courses for your department.