American Studies

413 Barnard Hall
212-854-5649
americanstudies.barnard.edu
Department Program Assistant: Kathryn McLean 

American Studies Program

American Studies is a field defined not only by the critical questions it asks but by the interdisciplinary methods it uses to answer those questions. In considering the United States as a cultural, ideological, geographical and historical formation, students of American Studies examine how cultural configurations of and within the nation-state  operate as social forces, contested archives of change, locus of power and resistance, and a site historical meaning and memory. How are ideologies and arrangements in the U.S. amplified, altered, challenged or contested? Through critical analysis, American Studies seeks to address these questions by considering how ideas and assumptions about the U.S. have been constituted through a range of competing and corroborating affiliations – gendered, racial, ethnic, transnational, corporate — arrangements that continue to impact the world today. 

Mission

The Program in American Studies is designed to teach students how to engage in the critical and  interdisciplinary study of United States cultures in contemporary, historical and transnational contexts.  After an introductory course entitled “What Is American Studies?,”  students take an intensive junior colloquium focusing on theories and methods of American Studies.  Their individually-chosen five-course concentration covers two historical periods and culminates in a two-course senior capstone project.  The major aims to teach students to recognize, question and analyze American cultural practices in historical depth as well as as global breadth.

Student Learning Objectives

Barnard students graduating with a degree in American Studies should be able to attain the following outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate a critical understanding of American cultural practices and their complex inter-relationships with national and global structures of power.
  2. Identify the cultural influences that have shaped American social formations including, but not limited to, history art, literature, politics, and religion.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the various theoretical and interdisciplinary methods used by current scholars within the field of American studies.
  4. Construct a sustained argument in a piece of original scholarship.

As an American Studies major, you will have the opportunity to take courses in the field of American Studies, but also in history, religion, visual culture, literature and other related disciplines and interdisciplinary fields. In addition to the introductory course "What Is American Studies?" and the junior colloquium, you will work with your American Studies adviser to devise a five-course concentration organized around a topic (for example: immigration, migration and ethnicity) and covering at least two historical periods. This student-designed cluster will serve as the intellectual foundation of your senior capstone project.

This program is supervised by the Committee on American Studies:

Director: Severin Fowles (Associate Professor in Anthropology)
Professors: Mark C. Carnes (History), Lynn Garafola (Dance), Lisa Gordis (English), Alfred Mac Adam (Spanish and Latin American Cultures), Robert A. McCaughey (History), Celia Naylor (History), Richard Pious (Political Science), Jonathan Rieder (Sociology), William Sharpe (English), Herbert Sloan (History), Neferti Tadiar (Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies), David Weiman (Economics), Alan Dye (Economics)
Associate Professors: Elizabeth Bernstein (Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies), Elizabeth Hutchinson (Art History), Kimberly S. Johnson (Political Science), Monica Miller (English)
Assistant Professors: Gergely Baics (History), Elizabeth Esch (History and American Studies), Severin Fowles (Anthropology), Peter Levin (Sociology)
Senior Associate: Katie Glasner (Dance)
Senior Lecturer: Pam Cobrin (English), Margaret Vandenburg (English)
Adjunct Professor: Nancy Woloch (History)
Director of the Center for Research on Women: Janet Jakobsen (Women's, Gender & Sexuality Studies)

Requirements for the Major

Points
AMST BC1001What is American Studies? (Majors are encouraged to complete this course before their sophomore year.)3
1. Majors are encouraged to complete this course before their sophomore year.
*

2. Foundations in American History (3 courses): Students must take one historically-focused course on the United States in each of the following time periods: pre-18001800-1900, and 1900-PresentCourses can be drawn from a variety of disciplines including, but not limited to, Africana Studies, Art History, English, French, History, Music, Political Science, Sociology, Spanish & Latin American Cultures, Theatre, Urban Studies ,and Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Each student must approve her concentration courses with her American Studies major advisor.

**

3. Junior Colloquium: AMST BC3401 Junior Colloquium in American Studies. This course offers an introduction to theoretical approaches of American Studies, as well as methods and materials used in the interdisciplinary study of American cultures and society. Offered only in the fall. Students studying abroad in the fall of their junior year will be expected to take the colloquium in the fall of their senior year.

Your Concentration

Themes

  • Gender and Race
  • Race
  • Class
  • Media and popular culture
  • Disability
  • Political theory and culture
  • Labor, production, and consumption
  • Transnational America
  • Natural and built environment
  • Family and kinship
  • Immigration, migration and ethnicity
  • Spirituality and belief
  • Proposed topic submitted via petition to the Chair

Historical Period

  • Aboriginal and Columbian period
  • Colonial, Revolutionary and Early Republic
  • Antebellum America
  • Civil War and Reconstruction
  • 1900-1945
  • 1945-present
  • Proposed time period submitted via petition to the Chair

Sample Concentration 1: Natural and Built Environment / 1900-1945

Points
ARCH V3114Making the Metropolis: Urban Design and Theories of the City since 18503
URBS V3830Eminent Domain and Neighborhood Change4
HIST W3441Making of the Modern American Landscape3
URBS V3725New York City's Gilded Ages: Coming of Age, Past and Present4

Sample Concentration 2: Race / Civil War and Reconstruction

Points
AFRS BC3556Ethnography of Black America4
HIST BC3243The Constitution in Historical Perspective3
HIST W3432The United States In the Era of Civil War and Reconstruction3
AMST BC3300Topics in American Studies: The Wealth of Natives4

AMST BC1001 What is American Studies?. 3 points.

Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None

What is America?  Who is American? How do we live in America?  This new lecture course will introduce you to the dynamic, inter-disciplinary field of American Studies.

Spring 2018: AMST BC1001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AMST 1001 001/03944 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Manu Vimalassery 3 165/165

AMST BC1510 The Profits of Race. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Does race appear in American life in the ways we make, distribute, and consume goods?  If so, how? Through film, literary criticism, history, ethnography and philosophy, this course will examine how race manifests as an economic relationship. We will focus on the legacies of chattel slavery, the interconnections of race and property, and ongoing struggles for racial justice. The course is grounded in what Cedric Robinson has referred to as the “Black radical tradition”: a centuries-long intellectual and political tradition oriented towards contesting the definition of a specific group of people (Black people) as property. We will examine ways that this central economic claim, which underpinned the chattel slavery system, continues to appear in our own society, in prisons, international migration system, residential segregation, underemployment, and other ways.

Fall 2017: AMST BC1510
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AMST 1510 001/04782 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
304 Barnard Hall
Manu Vimalassery 3 216/240

AMST BC3300 Topics in American Studies: The Wealth of Natives. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Indigenous people are often imagined in the distant past, or as living anachronisms in relation to contemporary life. Working against these assumptions, this course examines how Native peoples have survived colonialism, focusing on economic aspects of colonialism in North America. We will look at the long history of Native land struggles, and links between colonial economies and ecological destruction. Themes guiding our inquiry include: the development of wage labor, property law and economic production on Native lands, histories of political and economic dependency, "development" as defined and practiced over Native communities, and Native people's own economic choices. Our inquiry will be oriented towards deepening our ability to critically analyze the colonial situation we live in, and to see Indigenous survivals despite ongoing assaults against life and territory.

AMST BC3401 Junior Colloquium in American Studies. 4 points.

Introduction to the theoretical approaches of American Studies, as well as the methods and materials used in the interdisciplinary study of American society. Through close reading of a variety of texts (e.g., novels, films, essays), we will analyze the creation, maintenance, and transmission of cultural meaning within American society.

Fall 2017: AMST BC3401
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AMST 3401 001/01903 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
222 Milbank Hall
Jennie Kassanoff 4 14
AMST 3401 002/07965 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
530 Altschul Hall
Jordan Camp 4 11

AMST BC3703 Senior Seminar. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to senior majors.

Individual research on topic related to major thematic concentration and preparation of senior thesis.

Fall 2017: AMST BC3703
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AMST 3703 001/02181 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
502 Diana Center
Manu Vimalassery 4 10
AMST 3703 002/04777 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
501 Diana Center
Jordan Camp 4 11

AMST BC3704 Senior Seminar. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to senior majors.

Individual research on topic related to major thematic concentration and preparation of senior thesis.

Spring 2018: AMST BC3704
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AMST 3704 001/00373 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
4 15

AMST BC3999 Independent Research. 3-4 points.

AMST BC3310 Planet America. 3 points.

This course is a semester-long engagement with the idea of internationalism from the perspective of U.S. culture, history, and politics. We will consider two forms of internationalism: internationalism from above, “imperialism;” and internationalism from below, “radical democracy.” We will engage long-standing models in the analysis of empire, and focus on cultural, economic, and political dimensions to examine the centrality of imperialism to the United States, and the history of the United States within a context of global histories. On the other hand, radical democratic movements and ideas have long been articulated in relation to the American project. Central to these movements is the necessity of articulating demands for justice not as matters of civil rights, but as human rights. The lectures and readings in this course will engage the body of scholarship known as “transnational American Studies” to think about America, as an idea, a set of institutions, and a way of being, within a larger world.

Cross-Listed Courses 

Africana Studies (Barnard)

AFRS BC2006 Introduction to the African Diaspora. 3 points.

Interdisciplinary and thematic approach to the African diaspora in the Americas: its motivations, dimensions, consequences, and the importance and stakes of its study. Beginning with the contacts between Africans and the Portuguese in the 15th century, this class will open up diverse paths of inquiry as students attempt to answer questions, clear up misconceptions, and challenge assumptions about the presence of Africans in the 'New World.'

Spring 2018: AFRS BC2006
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AFRS 2006 001/07625 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
504 Diana Center
Yvette Christianse 3 12/12

AFRS BC3110 Africana Colloquium. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Students must attend first day of class and admission will be decided then. Enrollment limited to 18 students. Priority will be given to Africana majors and CCIS students (Africana Studies, American Studies and Women's Studies majors; minors in Race and Ethnic Studies).

Fall 2017: AFRS BC3110
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AFRS 3110 001/01852 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
404 Barnard Hall
Yvette Christianse 4 7
Spring 2018: AFRS BC3110
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AFRS 3110 001/05430 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Celia Naylor 4 6/16

AFRS BC3120 History of African-American Music. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Survey interrogates the cultural and aesthetic development of a variety of interconnected musical genres - such as blues, jazz, gospel, soul, funk, R&B, hip-hop, classical and their ever changing same/names - viewed as complex human activities daringly danced at dangerous discourses inside and outside the American cultural mainstreams.

AFRS BC3121 Black Women in America. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: Students must attend first day of class and admission will be decided then. Priority will be given to CCIS students (Africana Studies, American Studies and Women's Studies majors; minors in Race and Ethnic Studies). Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Examines the roles of black women in the U.S. as thinkers, activists and creators during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Focusing on the intellectual work, social activism and cultural expression of African American women, we examine how they understood their lives, resisted oppression and struggled to change society. We will also discuss theoretical frameworks (such as "double jeopardy," or "intersectionality") developed for the study of black women. The seminar will encourage students to pay particular attention to the diversity of black women and critical issues facing Black women today. This course is the same as WMST BC3121.

Anthropology (Barnard)

ANTH UN2005 Ethnographic Imagination. 3 points.

Introduction to the theory and practice of “ethnography”—the intensive study of peoples’ lives as shaped by social relations, cultural images, and historical forces. Considers through critical reading of various kinds of texts (classic ethnographies, histories, journalism, novels, films) the ways in which understanding, interpreting, and representing the lived words of people—at home or abroad, in one place or transnationally, in the past or the present—can be accomplished.  

Spring 2018: ANTH UN2005
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 2005 001/61687 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Lila Abu-Lughod 3 51/60

ANTH UN3040 Anthropological Theory I. 4 points.

Open to majors; all others with instructor's permission.

Prerequisites: an introductory course in anthropology.

Institutions of social life. Kinship and locality in the structuring of society. Monographs dealing with both literate and nonliterate societies will be discussed in the context of anthropological fieldwork methods.

Fall 2017: ANTH UN3040
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3040 001/09257 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
302 Milbank Hall
Lesley Sharp 4 11/25

ANTH UN3041 Anthropological Theory II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Required of all Barnard Anthropology majors; open to other students with instructor’s permission only. To be taken in conjunction with ANTH 3040, preferably in sequence.

The second of a two semester sequence intended to introduce departmental majors to key readings in social theory that have been constitutive of the rise and contemporary practice of modern anthropology. The goal is to understand historical and current intellectual debates within the discipline. This course replaces ANTH V 3041 - Theories of Culture: Past and Present.

Spring 2018: ANTH UN3041
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3041 001/03338 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Elizabeth Green 3 22/30
ANTH 3041 001/03338 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Elizabeth Green 3 22/30

ANTH UN3300 Pre-Columbian Histories of Native America. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Enrollment limited to 40.

This course explores 10,000 years of the North American archaeological record, bringing to light the unwritten histories of Native Americans prior to European contact. Detailed consideration of major pre-Columbian sites is interwoven with the insight of contemporary native peoples to provide both a scientific and humanist reconstruction of the past.

ANTH BC3868 Ethnographic Field Research in New York City. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Recommended for majors prior to the senior year. Open to non-majors by permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

A seminar-practicum on field research in New York City. Exploration of anthropological field research methods followed by supervised individual field research on selected topics in urban settings.

Spring 2018: ANTH BC3868
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3868 001/01187 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Lesley Sharp 4 8/15

ANTH V3907 Posthumanism. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Explores what a post-human anthropology might look like. Readings draw from anthropology, actor-network theory, science studies, media studies, and science fiction.

ANTH V3950 Anthropology of Consumption. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Examines theories and ethnographies of consumption, as well as the political economy of production and consumption. Compares historic and current consumptive practices, compares exchange-based economies with post-Fordist economies. Engages the work of Mauss, Marx, Godelier, Baudrillard, Appadurai, and Douglas, among others.

ANTH V3954 Bodies and Machines: Anthropologies of Technology. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Examines how bodies become mechanized and machines embodied. Studies shifts in the status of the human under conditions of capitalist commodification and mass mediation. Readings consist of works on the fetish, repetition and automaticity, reification, and late modern technoprosthesis.

ANTH V3960 The Culture of Public Art and Display In New York City. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 16.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Students must sign-up in the Anthropology Department prior to registering for this course.

A field course and seminar considering the aesthetic, political, and sociocultural aspects of selected city museums, public spaces, and window displays.

ANTH UN3966 Culture and Mental Health. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Limited to juniors & seniors.

This course considers mental disturbance and its relief by examining historical, anthropological, psychoanalytic and psychiatric notions of self, suffering, and cure. After exploring the ways in which conceptions of mental suffering and abnormality are produced, we look at specific kinds of psychic disturbances and at various methods for their alleviation.

Fall 2017: ANTH UN3966
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3966 001/76090 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
401 Hamilton Hall
Karen Seeley 4 17/20

ANTH V3969 Specters of Culture. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Pursues the spectral effects of culture in the modern. Traces the ghostly remainders of cultural machineries, circuitries of voice, and representational forms crucial to modern discourse networks through a consideration of anthropologically significant, primarily nonwestern sites and various domains of social creation - performance, ritual practice, narrative production, and technological invention. 

ANTH V3974 Lost Worlds, Secret Spaces: Modernity and the Child. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Examines the figure of the child in modernity. Study of children and the delineation of a special time called childhood have been crucial to the modern imagination; for example, the child tended to be assimilated to the anthropological notion to the "primitive" (and vice versa), with repercussions ranging from psychoanalysis to painting, from philosophy to politics. Engages the centrality of the child through interdisciplinary readings in anthropology, history, children's literature, art criticism, educational theory, and psychology.

ANTH V3980 Nationalism. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Intended for seniors, but not necessarily anthropology majors.

This course will cover the basic readings in the contemporary debate over nationalism. It will cover different disciplinary approaches and especially look at recent studies of nationalism in the formerly colonial world as well as in the industrial West. The readings will offer a mix of both theoretical and empirical studies. The readings include the following: 1) Eric Hobsbawm's Nationalism since 1780; 2) Ernest Gillner's Nations and Nationalism; 3) Benedict Anderson's Imagined Communities; 4) Anthony Smith's The Ethnic Origins of Nations; 5) Linda Coley's Britons; 6) Peter Sahlins's Boundaries; and 7) Partha Chatterjee's The Nation and Its Fragments.

Architecture (Barnard)

ARCH V3114 Making the Metropolis: Urban Design and Theories of the City since 1850. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Introduces the project of understanding modern cities, focusing on theories, practices and examples in Europe and North America since 1850. The global reach of Euro-American ideas will also be examined. There are two primary goals: to investigate diverse strategies of urban development and to evaluate the social implications of built form. Course material includes built projects as well as unbuilt and theoretical work, all of which shaped how architects and planners interpreted the city.

Comparative Literature (Barnard)

CLIA GU3660 Mafia Movies: From Sicily to The Sopranos. 3 points.

Examines representations of the mafia in American and Italian film and literature. Special attention to questions of ethnic identity and immigration. Comparison of the different histories and myths of the mafia in the U.S. and Italy. Readings includes novels, historical studies, and film criticism. Limit 35

Spring 2018: CLIA GU3660
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLIA 3660 001/01188 W 6:10pm - 10:00pm
328 Milbank Hall
Nelson Moe 3 17/35

CPLS UN3950 Literary Theory. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18.

Examination of concepts and assumptions present in contemporary views of literature. Theory of meaning and interpretation (hermeneutics); questions of genre (with discussion of representative examples); a critical analysis of formalist, psychoanalytic, structuralist, post-structuralist, Marxist, and feminist approaches to literature.

Dance (Barnard)

DNCE BC2565 World Dance History. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Investigates the multicultural perspectives of dance in major areas of culture, including African, Asian, Hispanic, Indian, Middle Eastern, as well as dance history of the Americas through reading, writing, viewing, and discussion of a wide range of resources. These include film, original documents, demonstration, and performance.

Spring 2018: DNCE BC2565
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
DNCE 2565 001/06751 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
302 Barnard Hall
Seth Williams 3 34

DNCE BC2570 Dance in New York City. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Study of the cultural roots and historical contexts of specific communities using New York City's dance scene as a laboratory. Students observe the social environments in which various modes of dance works are created while researching the history of dance in New York City. Course includes attendance at weekly events, lecture-demonstrations, and performances.

Fall 2017: DNCE BC2570
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
DNCE 2570 001/03542 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
409 Barnard Hall
Marjorie Folkman 3 25/25
DNCE 2570 002/04251 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
409 Barnard Hall
Marjorie Folkman 3 24/27
Spring 2018: DNCE BC2570
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
DNCE 2570 001/03542 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Siobhan Burke 3 25/25

DNCE BC2575 Choreography for the American Musical. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Suggested DNCE BC2560, BC2566, BC2570

Explores the history and evolution of American Musical Theater dance, a uniquely American art form, with special focus on the period known as "The Golden Era." Analysis of the genre's most influential choreographers (including Balanchine, de Mille, Robbins), their systems, methodologies and fusion of high and low art on the commerical stages.

DNCE BC2580 Tap as an American Art Form. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Prerequisites: DNCE BC1446 or equivalent experience.

Studio/lecture format focuses on tap technique, repertory, improvisation, and the development of tap explored through American history, jazz music, films, videos, and biographies.

Spring 2018: DNCE BC2580
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
DNCE 2580 001/04868 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Margaret Morrison 3 11

DNCE BC3001 Western Theatrical Dance from the Renaissance to the 1960s. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Focuses on the history of theatre dance forms originating in Europe and America from the Renaissance to the present. Includes reading, writing, viewing, and discussion of sources such as film, text, original documentation, demonstration, and performance.

Fall 2017: DNCE BC3001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
DNCE 3001 001/02201 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
302 Barnard Hall
Seth Williams 3 8

DNCE BC3570 Latin American and Caribbean Dance: Identities in Motion. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines the history and choreographic features of Latin American and Caribbean dance forms. Dances are analyzed in order to uncover the ways in which dancing shapes national, racial, and gender identities. Focuses on the globalization of these dances in New York City.

DNCE BC3574 Inventing the Contemporary: Dance Since the 1960s. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Explores modern/contemporary dance in the United States and Europe since the 1960's. Major units are devoted to the Judson Dance Theater and its postmodernist aftermath, Tanztheater and European dance revisionism, and African-American dance and the articulation of an aesthetic of cultural hybridity.

DNCE BC3578 Traditions of African-American Dance. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Traces the development of African-American dance, emphasizing the contribution of black artists and the influence of black traditions on American theatrical dance. Major themes include the emergence of African-American concert dance, the transfer of vernacular forms to the concert stage, and issues of appropriation, cultural self-identification, and artistic hybridity.

DNCE BC3583 Gender and Historical Memory in American Dance of the 1930's to the Early 1960's. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: One course in dance history/studies or permission of the instructor.

Explores the question of why so many women dancer/choreographers of the 1930's - to the early 1960's, including relatively well-known ones, have ended up as peripheral rather than central players in what has become the master narrative of a crucial era of the recent dance past.

DNCE BC3980 Performing the Political: Embodying Change in American Performance. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: An introductory course in dance or theatre history or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 12 students.

Exploration into the politics of performance and the performance of politics through the lens of 20th-century American dance.

Economics (Barnard)

ECON BC2010 The Economics of Gender. 3 points.

Examination of gender differences in the U.S. and other advanced industrial economies. Topics include the division of labor between home and market, the relationship between labor force participation and family structure, the gender earnings gap, occupational segregation, discrimination, and historical, racial, and ethnic group comparisons.

ECON BC3011 Inequality and Poverty. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035 or ECON BC3033, or permission of the instructor.

Conceptualization and measurement of inequality and poverty, poverty traps and distributional dynamics, economics and politics of public policies, in both poor and rich countries.

Spring 2018: ECON BC3011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3011 001/05251 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Ashley Timmer 3 65/65

ECON BC3012 Economics of Education. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035 and ECON BC2411 or permission of the instructor.

Analyzes education policies and education markets from an economic perspective. Examines challenges that arise when researchers attempt to identify the causal effects of inputs. Other topics: (1) education as an investment, (2) public school finance, (3) teacher labor markets, (4) testing/accountability programs, (5) school choice programs, and (6) urban public school reforms.

ECON BC3013 Economic History of the United States. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035 or ECON BC3033, or permission of the instructor.

Economic transformation of the United States from a small, open agrarian society in the late colonial era to the leading industrial economy of the 20th century. Emphasis is given to the quantitative, institutional, and spatial dimensions of economic growth, and the relationship between the changing structures of the economy and state.

Spring 2018: ECON BC3013
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3013 001/02981 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
302 Barnard Hall
David Weiman 3 49

ECON BC3019 Labor Economics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035, or permission of the instructor.

Factors affecting the allocation and remuneration of labor; population structure; unionization and monopsony; education and training, mobility and information; sex and race discrimination; unemployment; and public policy.

Fall 2017: ECON BC3019
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3019 001/08324 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
302 Barnard Hall
Lalith Munasinghe 3 20/50

ECON UN3265 The Economics of Money and Banking. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3033 and ECON BC3035 or the equivalent.

Introduction to the principles of money and banking. The intermediary institutions of the American economy and their historical developments, current issues in monetary and financial reform.

Fall 2017: ECON UN3265
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3265 001/05362 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
202 Altschul Hall
Jose Cao-Alvira 3 85
Spring 2018: ECON UN3265
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3265 001/60204 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Tri Vi Dang 3 110/110

Education (Barnard)

EDUC BC3032 Contemporary Issues in Education. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Course enrollment will be determined after the first class meeting; application is available on CourseWorks.,,Open to all students; preference given to Urban Teaching, Education Studies and Urban Studies students.

Contemporary Issues in Education is an introduction to the range of intellectual dilemmas that are a part of American schooling through the illumination of the various social, philosophical, economic, and institutional forces that shape the learning environment. The topics serve to promote critical thought of educational dilemmas stemming from issues such as power and authority, the intersection of race, gender, socio-economic inequity, and challenges that confront students such as identity, marginalization and resiliency. This course is open to all students interested in investigating one’s best “fit” in the education realm, which may include classroom teaching, educational policy, reform, and NGO-based involvement.

Fall 2017: EDUC BC3032
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EDUC 3032 001/03742 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
214 Milbank Hall
Thea Abu El-Haj 4 14/24
Spring 2018: EDUC BC3032
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EDUC 3032 001/06110 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Thea Abu El-Haj 4 25/24

EDUC BC3050 Science in the City. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

In partnership with the American Museum of Natural History students investigate science, science pedagogical methods, and ways to use New York City as a resource for science teaching and learning. Sessions will be held at Barnard and the museum. Field trips and fieldwork required. Non-science majors pre-service elementary students and first year students, welcome. Note: Students in the Childhood Urban Teaching Program may use this course as a pedagogical elective.

Spring 2018: EDUC BC3050
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EDUC 3050 001/04696 W 4:30pm - 6:20pm
Room TBA
Maria Rivera Maulucci 4 16/16

English (Barnard)

ENGL BC3129 Explorations of Black Literature: Early African-American Lit. 1760-1890. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students.

Poetry, prose, fiction, and nonfiction, with special attention to the slave narrative. Includes Wheatley, Douglass, and Jacobs, but emphasis will be on less familiar writers such as Brown, Harper, Walker, Wilson, and Forten. Works by some 18th-century precursors will also be considered.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3129
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3129 001/08519 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
405 Barnard Hall
Quandra Prettyman 3 13/18

ENGL BC3130 The American Cowboy and the Iconography of the West. 3 points.

We will consider the image and role of the cowboy in fiction, social history, film, music, and art. Readings will include Cormac McCarthy's "The Border Trilogy.

Spring 2018: ENGL BC3130
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3130 001/00434 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
407 Barnard Hall
Margaret Ellsberg 3 14/14

ENTH BC3144 Black Theatre. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Exploration of Black Theater, specifically African-American performance traditions, as an intervening agent in racial, cultural, and national identity. African-American theatre artists to be examined include Amiri Baraka, Kia Corthron, W.E.B. Du Bois, Angelina Grimke, Langston Hughes, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Adrienne Kennedy, Suzan-Lori Parks, Adrian Piper, and August Wilson. Fulfills one (of two) required courses in dramatic literature for Theatre/Drama and Theatre Arts major.

ENGL BC3179 American Literature to 1800. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.

Early American histories, autobiographies, poems, plays, and novels tell stories of pilgrimage and colonization; private piety and public life; the growth of national identity; Puritanism, Quakerism, and Deism; courtship and marriage; slavery and abolition. Writers include Bradford, Shepard, Bradstreet, Taylor, Rowlandson, Edwards, Wheatley, Franklin, Woolman, and Brown.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3179
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3179 001/08102 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
409 Barnard Hall
Lisa Gordis 3 19

ENGL BC3180 American Literature, 1800-1870. 3 points.

Beginning with literature from the late Republican period, this course considers how nascent efforts to forge a national identity culminate in Civil War.  Writers include Brown, Irving, Emerson, Poe, Hawthorne, Thoreau, Douglass, Melville, Jacobs, Whitman, and Dickinson.

Spring 2018: ENGL BC3180
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3180 001/04294 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Lisa Gordis 3 25

ENGL BC3181 American Literature, 1871-1945. 3 points.

This interdisciplinary course situates late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American literature within the context of historical and cultural change. Students read works by Whitman, Melville, Twain, James, Griggs, Wharton, Cather, Faulkner, and Hurston alongside political and cultural materials including Supreme Court decisions, geometric treatises, composite photography and taxidermic tableaux.

ENGL BC3182 American Fiction. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

American fiction from the 18th to the early 20th centuries.  Writers include Rowson, Hawthorne, Melville, Alcott, Twain, James, Wharton, Faulkner, Wright.

ENGL BC3183 American Literature since 1945. 3 points.

In the wake of World War II, the so-called American Century rises out of the ashes of fascism, haunted by the specter of bombs blurring the boundary between victory and defeat.  An ideological civil war ensues, punctuated by literary resistance to grand narratives and their discontents.  Authors include Ellison, O’Connor, Ginsberg, Bishop, Pynchon, Robinson, Merrill, Morrison, Didion, and Wallace.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3183
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3183 001/04988 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
328 Milbank Hall
Margaret Vandenburg 3 41/56

ENGL BC3196 Home to Harlem: Literature of the Harlem Renaissance. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 20 students.

In the spring of 2016, ENGL 3196y will be centered on the relationship between art, activism and social justice as this relationship was developed during the Harlem Renaissance and beyond. Exploring the cultural contexts and aesthetic debates that animated Harlem in 1920s to 1930s, the course will focus on the politics of literary and theatrical production, and explore the fashioning and performance of New Negro identity through fiction, poetry, essays, and artwork, with special attention to theater/performance. This course will partner with Harlem's National Black Theater and work toward an understanding of the relationship between art/literature and socio-political change through the NBT's spring 2016 production of Dominique Morisseau's Blood on the Root, a multi-genre performance piece on racial injustice inspired by the 2006 Jena Six case in Louisiana.

Environmental Science (Barnard)

EESC BC3040 Environmental Law. 3 points.

Process-oriented introduction to the law and its use in environmental policy and decision-making. Origins and structure of the U.S. legal system. Emphasis on litigation process and specific cases that elucidate the common law and toxic torts, environmental administrative law, and environmental regulation through application and testing of statutory law in the courts. Emphasis also on the development of legal literacy, research skills, and writing.

Spring 2018: EESC BC3040
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 3040 001/06952 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
530 Altschul Hall
Peter Bower, Elena Neascu 3 23/25

Human Rights Studies (Barnard)

HRTS BC1025 Human Rights in Theory and Practice. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.

Provides a broad overview of the rapidly expanding field of human rights. Lectures on the philosophical, historical, legal and institutional foundations are interspersed with weekly presentations by frontline advocates from the U.S. and overseas.

Spring 2018: HRTS BC1025
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HRTS 1025 001/05170 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
903 Altschul Hall
J. Paul Martin 3 55/55

HRTS UN3001 Introduction to Human Rights. 3 points.

Evolution of the theory and content of human rights; the ideology and impact of human rights movements; national and international human rights law and institutions; their application with attention to universality within states, including the U.S., and internationally.

Fall 2017: HRTS UN3001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HRTS 3001 001/69233 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Ren Kraft Center
Andrew Nathan 3 151/170

History (Barnard)

HIST BC1402 Survey of American Civilization Since the Civil War. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Examines the major intellectual and social accommodations made by Americans to industrialization and urbanization; patterns of political thought from Reconstruction to the New Deal; selected topics on post-World War II developments.

Spring 2018: HIST BC1402
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 1402 001/02332 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Robert McCaughey 4 47/90

HIST BC2413 The United States, 1940-1975. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Emphasis on foreign policies as they pertain to the Second World War, the atomic bomb, containment, the Cold War, Korea, and Vietnam. Also considers major social and intellectual trends, including the Civil Rights movement, the counterculture, feminism, Watergate, and the recession of the 1970s.

Fall 2017: HIST BC2413
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2413 001/07891 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
304 Barnard Hall
Mark Carnes 3 144/160

HIST BC2424 Approached by Sea: Early American Maritime Culture. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Thematically and chronologically ordered narrative of the impact of the Atlantic Ocean and its tidal tributaries upon the beginnings and subsequent development of the American colonies and of the Early American Republic. Special stress will be placed upon the physical givens and cultural implications of the coastal environment in which early Americans went about their lives.

Music

MUSI V2010 Rock. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: HUMA W1123 or the equivalent.

Historical survey of rock music from its roots in the late 1940s to the present day.

MUSI UN2016 Jazz. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

The musical and cultural features of jazz, beginning in 1900. 

Fall 2017: MUSI UN2016
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 2016 001/29829 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
417 International Affairs Bldg
Christopher Washburne 3 82/200

MUSI V2020 Salsa, Soca, and Reggae: Popular Musics of the Caribbean. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART)., CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

A survey of the major syncretic urban popular music styles of the Caribbean, exploring their origins, development, and sociocultural context.

MUSI V3420 The Social Science of Music. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: HUMA W1123 or the equivalent.

An introduction to the field of ethnomusicology in the context of the intellectual history of music scholarship.  IN FALL 2011, THIS COURSE WILL BE OFFERED TR 6:10-7:25 IN RM 622 DODGE.

MUSI W4420 Music and Property. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This courses raises the questions: 1) What does it mean to "own" music?, 2) In what senses can music be conceptualized as "property?"; and 3) How do divergent understandings of music's status as "property" shape contemporary debates and discourses in the particular areas of disputes over "illegal downloading" of copyrighted music and the "repatriation" of Native American musical recordings as "cultural property?" Several relevant major recent statements will be considered and responses discussed. Case studies from ethnomusicological, anthropological, media studies and legal literatures engage issues of appropriation, the role of new technologies in shifting the terrain of musical ownership will be studied. Hands-on look at the Columbia Center for Ethnomusicology's ongoing projects to repatriate historic recordings of Native American music (currently 'owned' by Columbia University) to the Navajo and Iñupiat tribes.

MUSI W4507 The New Thing: Jazz 1955-1980. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

An examination of the new jazz that emerged shortly after the middle of the 20th century.  The seminar will include the work of musicians such as Ornette Coleman, Cecil Taylor, Don Cherry, Anthony Braxton, Carla Cley, Albert Ayler, and the Arts Ensemble of Chicago; the economics and politics of the period; parallel developments in other arts; the rise of new performance spaces, recording companies, and collectives; and the accomplishments of the music and the problems it raised for jazz performance and criticism.

MUSI GU4540 Histories of Post-1960's Jazz. 3 points.

Prerequisites: HUMA W1123 or the equivalent.

Historiographical issues surrounding the performance of jazz and improvised musics after 1960. Topics include genre and canon formation, gender, race, and cultural nationalisms, economics and infrastructure, debates around art and the vernacular, globalization, and media reception. Reading knowledge of music is not required.

Philosophy (Barnard)

PHIL UN2110 Philosophy and Feminism. 4 points.

Is there an essential difference between women and men? How do questions about race conflict or overlap with those about gender? Is there a "normal" way of being "queer"? Introduction to philosophy and feminism through a critical discussion of these and other questions using historical and contemporary texts, art, and public lectures. Focus includes essentialism, difference, identity, knowledge, objectivity, and queerness.

Fall 2017: PHIL UN2110
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 2110 001/19570 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
833 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Christia Mercer 4 87/110

Political Science (Barnard)

POLS UN1201 Introduction To American Government and Politics. 4 points.

Lecture and discussion. Dynamics of political institutions and processes, chiefly of the national government. Emphasis on the actual exercise of political power by interest groups, elites, political parties, and public opinion.

Fall 2017: POLS UN1201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 1201 001/16294 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
417 International Affairs Bldg
Justin Phillips 4 363/400

POLS UN3212 Environmental Politics. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I).

Prerequisites: None. Some knowledge of American politics and government (i.e. prior high school or college coursework) is recommended. Barnard syllabus. \n \n "L" sign-up through myBarnard.

The political setting in which environmental policy-making occurs. The course will focus on grassroots and top-down policy-making in the United States with some comparative examples.Topics include the conservation movement and national agenda politics, pollution control and iron triangle politics, alternative energy policy and subsidy politics, climate change and issue networks, and transnational environmental issues and negotiation of international policy regimes. (Cross-listed by the American Studies Program.)

Fall 2017: POLS UN3212
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3212 001/06299 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Ll104 Diana Center
Richard Pious 3 18/50

POLS BC3254 First Amendment Values. 3 points.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or an equivalent. Not an introductory course. Not open to students who have taken the colloquium POLS BC3302. Enrollment limited to 25 students; L-course sign-up.

Examines the first amendment rights of speech, press, religion and assembly. In-depth analysis of landmark Supreme Court rulings provides the basis for exploring theoretical antecedents as well as contemporary applications of such doctrines as freedom of association, libel, symbolic speech, obscenity, hate speech, political speech, commercial speech, freedom of the press and religion. (Cross-listed by the American Studies Program.)

Spring 2018: POLS BC3254
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3254 001/01940 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Ll103 Diana Center
Paula Franzese 3 40/40

POLS V3313 American Urban Politics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Patterns of government and politics in America's large cities and suburbs: the urban socioeconomic environment; the influence of party leaders, local officials, social and economic notables, and racial, ethnic, and other interest groups; mass media, the general public, and the state and federal governments; and the impact of urban governments on ghetto and other urban conditions. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 3213.

POLS BC3331 * Colloquium on American Political Decisionmaking. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

Readings on decisionmaking, policy analysis, and the political setting of the administrative process. Students will simulate an ad hoc Cabinet Committee assigned to prepare a presidential program to deal with aspects of the foreign aid program involving hunger and malnutrition. (Cross-listed by the American Studies Program and by the Athena Center for Leadership Studies.)

POLS BC3332 * Colloquium on Exploring Political Leadership in the U.S.. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

Exploration of the effect of political leadership on political outcomes in the United States, with special attention to how individual characteristics, like personality, political style, ideology, gender, race and class, interact with the political environment in shaping political outcomes. (Cross-listed by the American Studies Program and by the Athena Center for Leadership Studies.)

POLS BC3521 Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. 3 points.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or the equivalent. Not an introductory-level course. Not open to students who have taken the colloquium POLS BC3326. Enrollment limited to 25 students; L-course sign-up through eBear. Barnard syllabus.

Explores seminal caselaw to inform contemporary civil rights and civil liberties jurisprudence and policy.  Specifically, the readings examine historical and contemporary first amendment values, including freedom of speech and the press, economic liberties, takings law, discrimination based on race, gender, class and sexual preference, affirmative action, the right to privacy, reproductive freedom, the right to die, criminal procedure and adjudication, the rights of the criminally accused post-9/11 and the death penalty. (Cross-listed by the American Studies and Human Rights Programs.)

Fall 2017: POLS BC3521
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3521 001/04891 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
323 Milbank Hall
Paula Franzese 3 53/60

POLS W4316 The American Presidency. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or any course that qualifies for the the introductory-level American Politics course. Barnard syllabus. \n \n "L" sign-up through eBear.

Growth of presidential power, creation and use of the institutionalized presidency, presidential-congressional and presidential-bureaucratic relationships, and the presidency and the national security apparatus. (Cross-listed by the American Studies Program.)

Religion (Barnard)

RELI V2505 Intro to Judaism. 3 points.

A historical overview of Jewish belief and practice as these have crystallized and changed over the centuries. Special attention to ritual and worship, the forms of religious literature, central concepts, religious leadership and institutions, Israel among the nations.

RELI V2645 Religion in Black America: An Introduction. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Undergraduate lecture course introducing students to the study of African American religion. While there are no required prerequisites for the course, prior coursework in religious studies or African American history is helpful. This course progresses as a historical survey and is intended to introduce students to important themes in African American (thus American) religious history (i.e. migration, urbanization, nationalism) through a rich engagement with the religious practices and traditions of black communities. Primary attention is given to Afro-Protestantism in North America; however, throughout the course attention is directed to religious diversity and varying religious traditions/practices in different diasporic locales. While this is a lecture course, students are expected to arrive each week having completed assigned readings and prepared to make informed contributions to class discussions (as class size allows). By the end of the semester students will be expected to possess a working knowledge of major themes/figures/traditions in African American religious life, as well as key questions that have shaped the study thereof.

RELI V3602 Religion in America I. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

Survey of American religion from the Civil War to the present, with the emphasis on the ways religion has shaped American history, culture, identity.

RELI V3603 Religion in America II. 3 points.

Survey of American religion from the Civil War to the present, with an emphasis on the ways religion has shaped American history, culture, and identity.

RELI V3604 Religion in the City. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Uses the city to address and investigate a number of central concepts in the study of religion, including ritual, community, worldview, conflict, tradition, and discourse.  We will explore together what we can learn about religions by focusing on place, location, and context.

RELI V3610 Religion in American Film. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Exploration of relationships between religion and popular film with particular attention to the way religious narratives and symbols in film uphold and critique norms of race, class and gender in the formation of American societal institutions (political structures, economy, family and community organization).

RELI V3650 Religion and the Civil Rights Movement. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examination of the role of religion in the drive for civil rights during the 1950s and 1960s. The course will look at the role of activists, churches, clergy, sermons, and music in forging the consensus in favor of civil rights.

RELI V3651 Evangelicalism. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Survey of evangelicalism, "America's folk religion," in all of its various forms, including the holiness movement, fundamentalism, pentecostalism, the charismatic movement, neoevangelicalism, the sanctified tradition, and various ethnic expressions. The course will examine the origins of evangelicalism, its theology, and the cultural and political involvement of American evangelicals.

RELI W4610 Science, Nature, and Religion in 20th Century America. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examination of the relationship between scientific and religious ideas, with particular reference to American culture in the twentieth century. Explores the impact of such events as the Scopes trial and the popular faith in science and technology of the religious attitudes and beliefs of 20th-century Americans.

RELI W4614 Defining Marriage: A History of Marriage in the United States. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar examines the changing purpose and meaning of marriage in the history of the United States from European colonization through contemporary debates over gay marriage.  Topics include religious views of marriage, interracial marriage, and the political uses of the institution.

RELI W4620 Religious Worlds of New York. 4 points.

This seminar teaches ethnographic approaches to studying religious life with a special focus on urban religion and religions of New York. Students develop in-depth analyses of religious communities using these methods. Course readings address both ethnographic methods and related ethical and epistemological issues, as well as substantive topical issues of central importance to the study of urban religion, including transnationalism and immigration, religious group life and its relation to local community life, and issues of ethnicity, race and cosmopolitanism in pluralistic communities.

RELI W4640 Religion in the American Public Sphere. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Introduction to questions surrounding the relationships between religion and the public sphere in the United States. Approaches topics of civil religion, church-state relations, religious pluralism in the public sphere, and the role of congregations in local communities using sociological theories and methods.

RELI W4645 American Protestant Thought. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Looks at the relation between inquiry and imagination in selected religious writers and writers on religion in the American Protestant tradition. How does imagination serve inquiry? What are the objects of inquiry in these writings? Most of these authors reflect explicitly on imagination and inquiry, in addition to providing examples of both at work on religious topics.

RELI W4660 Religious History of New York. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Survey of religious life in New York City, from the English conquest of 1684 through changes to the immigration laws in 1965.

RELI W4670 Native American Religions. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Limited to 20 students.

Examines the varieties of Native American religions and spirituality, from contact to the present, including a look at the effects of European religions on Native American traditions.

RELI W4721 Religion and Social Justice. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Sophomore standing.

Examines current debates on three topics (religious reasons in public discourse, human rights, and democracy). Also looks briefly at some uses of the Exodus story, focusing on Michael Walzer's study of its political uses, Edward Said's criticism of Walzer's use of it in connection with contemporary Israel, and its role in debates among African Americans in the nineteenth century.

RELI W4803 Religion Vs. The Academy. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing. At least one course in Religion.

Today we hear heated debates about the proper aims of education in relation to those of religion. The impact of the David Project's "Columbia Unbecoming" on the Department of MESAAS and the university as a whole (2008) is a case in point. More recently (2014), in response to threatened legal action from the Hindu right, Penguin Press of India has withdrawn Wendy Doniger's book "The Hindus" from circulation, generating an international controversy. This course focuses on case studies from India and the United States-sometimes parallel, sometimes divergent, sometimes overlapping. Wendy Doniger and Gurinder Singh Mann will be guests.

RELI W4805 Secular and Spiritual America. 4 points.

Priority given to majors and concentrators.

Are Americans becoming more secular or more spiritual (not religious), or both? What are the connections between secularism and what is typically called non-organized religion or the spiritual in the United States?  We will address these questions by looking at some of the historical trajectories that shape contemporary debates and designations (differences) between spiritual, secular and religious.

Sociology (Barnard)

SOCI UN2208 Culture in America. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Corequisites: General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC).

The values and meanings that form American pluralism. The three sections explore taste, consumption, and art; moral conflict, religion and secularism; identity, community and ideology. Examples range widely: Individualism, liberalism and conservatism; Obama's "transracial" endeavor; the food revolution; struggles over family and sexuality; multiculturalism; assimilation and immigration.

Spring 2018: SOCI UN2208
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 2208 001/01114 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Ll104 Diana Center
Jonathan Rieder 3 52/69

SOCI V3208 Unity and Division in the Contemporary United States: A Sociological View. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Conflict and unity in the U.S: the tensions of individualism and communalism; the schism between blue and red states; culture war; the careers of racism and anti-Semitism; identity politics and fragmentation; immigration and second eneration identities; the changing status of whiteness and blackness; cultural borrowing and crossover culture.

SOCI V3220 Masculinity: A Sociological View. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: One introductory course in Sociology is suggested.

Examines the cultural, political, and institutional forces that govern masculinity. Focuses on various meanings of "being a man" and the effects these different types of masculinity have on both men and women. Explores some of the variation among men and relationships between men and women.

SOCI V3227 The Sociology of U.S. Economic Life. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: one introductory course in sociology is recommended.

Examines the social forces that shape market behavior: ideologies of liberalism and conservatism; the culture of commodities and consumption; income, class, and quality of life; the immigrant economy; life in financial institutions; the impact of the global economy.

SOCI UN3235 Social Movements: Collective Action. 3 points.

Prerequisites: One introductory course in Sociology suggested.

Social movements and the theories social scientists use to explain them, with emphasis on the American civil rights and women's movements.  Topics include theories of participation, the personal and social consequences of social movements, the rationality of protest, the influence of ideology, organization, and the state on movement success, social movements, and the mass media.

Fall 2017: SOCI UN3235
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3235 001/01592 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
324 Milbank Hall
Marnie Brady 3 20

SOCI V3247 The Immigrant Experience, Old and New. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The immigrant experience in the United States. Topics include ideologies of the melting pot; social, cultural, and economic life of earlier immigrants; the distinctiveness of the African-American experience; recent surge of "new" immigrants (Asians, Latinos, West Indians); and changing American views of immigration.

SOCI UN3264 The Changing American Family. 3 points.

Worries and debates about the family are in the news daily. But how in fact is "the family" changing? And why? This course will study the family from a sociological perspective with primary emphasis on continuity and change and variation across different historical eras. We'll examine how the diversity of family life and constellations of intimacy and care are shaped by gender, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and sexuality.   Discussion section (required) will engage with readings as well as events in the news/ social media of interest to students.  

SOCI W3277 Post-Racial America?. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

What is race? Is the US a post-racial society? Is such a society desirable? Is a post-racial society necessarily a just and egalitarian one? We consider these questions from ethnographic, historical, and theoretical perspectives. Topics discussed include intersectionality, multiracial identity, colorism, genetics, and the race and/or class debate.

SOCI UN3302 Sociology of Gender. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Prerequisites: One introductory course in Sociology suggested.

Examination of factors in gender identity that are both universal (across time, culture, setting) and specific to a social context. Social construction of gender roles in different settings, including family, work, and politics. Attention to the role of social policies in reinforcing norms or facilitating change.

Fall 2017: SOCI UN3302
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3302 001/05599 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
409 Barnard Hall
Marnie Brady 3 26/35

SOCI V3318 The Sociology of Sexuality. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Introductory course in Sociology is suggested.

Social, cultural and organizational aspects of sex in the contemporary United States, stressing the plural in sexualities: sexual revolution and post-Victorian ideologies; the context of gender and inequality; social movements and sexual identity; the variety of sexual meanings and communities; the impact of AIDS.

SOCI V3324 Poverty, Inequality, and Policy: A Sociological Perspective. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Introductory course in Sociology is suggested.

Examination of poverty, the "underclass," and inequality in the United States. Part 1: The moral premises, social theories, and political interests shaping current debates about the poor. Part 2: A more concrete analysis of the lives of the poor and the causes of family breakdown, the drug economy, welfare, employment, and homelessness.

SOCI UN3901 The Sociology of Culture. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

Prerequisites: SOCI BC1003 or equivalent social science course and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15 students.

Drawing examples from popular music, religion, politics, race, and gender, explores the interpretation, production, and reception of cultural texts and meanings. Topics include aesthetic distinction and taste communities, ideology, power, and resistance; the structure and functions of subcultures; popular culture and high culture; and ethnography and interpretation.

Fall 2017: SOCI UN3901
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3901 001/03482 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
502 Diana Center
Jonathan Rieder 4 16
Spring 2018: SOCI UN3901
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3901 001/03901 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Jonathan Rieder 4 27

SOCI BC3903 Work and Culture. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Preference for Barnard Leadership Initiative participants, Juniors and Seniors. Permission of the instructor.

Sociological approaches to understanding work and culture. Theoretical underpinnings of workplace interactions, with attention to ethnographies of work across a range of organizations. Examines changes in work due to technological advances and globalization. Special emphasis on gender.

SOCI BC3909 Ethnic Conflict and Unrest. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing. SOCI BC1003 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Post-1965 immigration in the U.S. has prompted conflicts between new immigrant groups and established racial and ethnic groups. This seminar explores ethnic conflict and unrest that takes place in the streets, workplace, and everyday social life. Focus is on sociological theories that explain the tensions associated with the arrival of new immigrants.

SOCI W3936 Sociology and the Public. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Sociological Imagination (SOCI V1202) or The Social World (SOCI W1000) (not required).

This course explores how sociologists address pressing public concerns. With a focus on contemporary American issues, we will discuss: (1) how particular problems are identified; (2) what resolutions are put forth, who is likely to achieve them, and how; (3) what the audience is (and should be) for such work.

Spanish and Latin American Cultures (Barnard)

SPAN UN3350 Hispanic Cultures II: Enlightenment to the Present. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course surveys cultural production of Spain and Spanish America from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries. Students will acquire the knowledge needed for the study of the cultural manifestations of the Hispanic world in the context of modernity. Among the issues and events studied will be the Enlightenment as ideology and practice, the Napoleonic invasion of Spain, the wars of Spanish American independence, the fin-de-siècle and the cultural avant-gardes, the wars and revolutions of the twentieth century (Spanish Civil War, the Mexican and Cuban revolutions), neoliberalism, globalization, and the Hispanic presence in the United States. The goal of the course is to study some key moments of this trajectory through the analysis of representative texts, documents, and works of art. Class discussions will seek to situate the works studied within the political and cultural currents and debates of the time. All primary materials, class discussion, and assignments are in Spanish. This course is required for the major and the concentration in Hispanic Studies.

Fall 2017: SPAN UN3350
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3350 001/67165 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
505 Casa Hispanica
Anayvelyse Allen-Mossman 3 7/15
SPAN 3350 002/75252 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
206 Casa Hispanica
Omar Duran-Garcia 3 9/15
SPAN 3350 003/73379 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
201 Casa Hispanica
David Mejia 3 10/15
SPAN 3350 004/23165 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
201 Casa Hispanica
Gustavo Perez-Firmat 3 17/20
SPAN 3350 005/74557 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
201 Casa Hispanica
Analia Lavin 3 14/15
Spring 2018: SPAN UN3350
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3350 001/22866 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
201 Casa Hispanica
Anayvelyse Allen-Mossman 3 15/15
SPAN 3350 002/11920 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
505 Casa Hispanica
Omar Duran-Garcia 3 15/15
SPAN 3350 003/26339 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
201 Casa Hispanica
David Mejia 3 15/15
SPAN 3350 004/61703 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
505 Casa Hispanica
Analia Lavin 3 4/15
SPAN 3350 005/04777 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Ronald Briggs 3 12/15

Theatre (Barnard)

THTR V2002 New York Theatre. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited. Permission given by instructor only at first meeting.

Students attend a variety of performances as well as a weekly lab meeting. Emphasis on expanding students' critical vocabulary and understanding of current New York theatre and its history. Section on contemporary New York theatre management and production practices.

ENTH BC3139 Modern American Drama and Performance. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date, time, and location that sign-up sheets go up is listed here: http://english.barnard.edu/sign-ups

Modern American drama in the context of theatrical exploration, cultural contestation, performance history, and social change. Playwrights include Crothers, Glaspell, O'Neill, Odets, Wilder, Stein, Williams, Miller, Hansberry, Albee, Fornes, Kennedy, Mamet, Parks, and Ruhl.

ENTH BC3144 Black Theatre. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Exploration of Black Theater, specifically African-American performance traditions, as an intervening agent in racial, cultural, and national identity. African-American theatre artists to be examined include Amiri Baraka, Kia Corthron, W.E.B. Du Bois, Angelina Grimke, Langston Hughes, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Adrienne Kennedy, Suzan-Lori Parks, Adrian Piper, and August Wilson. Fulfills one (of two) required courses in dramatic literature for Theatre/Drama and Theatre Arts major.

THTR V3151 Western Theatre Traditions: Modern. 3 points.

Dialectical approach to reading and thinking about the history of dramatic theatre in the west, interrogating the ways poetry inflects, and is inflected by, the material dynamics of performance. We will undertake careful study of the practices of performance, and of the sociocultural, economic, political, and aesthetic conditions animating representative plays of the Western tradition from the late eighteenth century to today; course will also emphasize development of important critical concepts for the analysis of drama, theatre, and performance. Specific attention will be given to the ideology of realism and naturalism, the development of epic theatre, the theatre of cruelty, postcolonial performance, and the continuing invention of dramatic forms (theatre of the absurd, speechplays, postdramatic theatre), as well as to the political and theoretical impact of race, gender, sexuality in modern performance culture. Writing: 2-3 papers; Reading: 1-2 plays, critical and historical reading per week; final examination. Fulfills one (of two) Theatre History requirements for Theatre/Drama and Theatre Arts majors.

Urban Studies

URBS V3420 Introduction to Urban Sociology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Students must attend first class.

Examines the diverse ways in which sociology has defined and studied cities, focusing on the people who live and work in the city, and the transformations U.S. cities are undergoing today. Sociological methods, including ethnography, survey research, quantitative studies, and participant observation will provide perspectives on key urban questions such as street life, race, immigration, globalization, conflict, and redevelopment.

URBS V3545 Junior Colloquium: The Shaping of the Modern City. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Non-majors admitted by permission of instructor. Students must attend first class. Enrollment limited to 16 students per section. General Education Requirement: Historical Studies.

Introduction to the historical process and social consequences of urban growth, from the middle of the nineteenth century to the present.

URBS UN3546 Junior Colloquium: Contemporary Urban Issues. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Non-majors admitted by permission of instructor. Students must attend first class. Enrollment limited to 16 students per section.

Evaluation of current political, economic, social, cultural and physical forces that are shaping urban areas.

Fall 2017: URBS UN3546
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
URBS 3546 001/09945 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
304 Hamilton Hall
Kathryn Yatrakis 4 14/16

URBS V3550 Community Building and Economic Development. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Must attend first class for instructor permission. Preference to Urban Studies majors.

Community building has emerged as an important approach to creating an economic base, reducing poverty and improving the quality of life in urban neighborhoods. In this course, students examine the methods, strategies, and impact of community building on the economic, social, and political development of urban neighborhoods.

URBS V3920 Social Entrepreneurship. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Must attend first class for instructor permission. Preference to Urban Studies majors. General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC). Only 16 admitted.

Introduction to the main concepts and processes associated with the creation of new social enterprises, policies, programs, and organizations; criteria for assessing business ventures sponsored by non-profits and socially responsible initiatives undertaken by corporations; specific case studies using New York City as a laboratory. To be offered Fall 2011.

Women's Studies (Barnard)

WMST UN1001 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies. 3 points.

An interdisciplinary introduction to key concepts and analytical categories in women's and gender studies. This course grapples with gender in its complex intersection with other systems of power and inequality, including: sexuality, race and ethnicity, class and nation. Topics include: feminisms, feminist and queer theory, commodity culture, violence, science and technology, visual cultures, work, and family.

Spring 2018: WMST UN1001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WMST 1001 001/67958 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Deborah Valenze, Laura Ciolkowski 3 53/90

WMST BC3121 Black Women in America. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Students must attend first day of class and admission will be decided then. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Examines roles of black women in the U.S. as thinkers, activists and creators during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Focusing on the intellectual work, social activism and cultural expression of African American women, we examine how they understood their lives, resisted oppression and struggled to change society. We will also discuss theoretical frameworks (such as "double jeopardy," or "intersectionality") developed for the study of black women. The seminar will encourage students to pay particular attention to the diversity of black women and critical issues facing Black women today. This course is the same as AFRS BC3121 Black Women in America.

WMST BC3131 Women and Science. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students.

History and politics of women's involvement with science. Women's contributions to scientific discovery in various fields, accounts by women scientists, engineers, and physicians, issues of science education. Feminist critiques of biological research and of the institution of science.

WMST UN3311 Colloquium in Feminist Theory. 4 points.

Prerequisites: LIMITED TO 20 BY INSTRUC PERM; ATTEND FIRST CLASS

An exploration of the relationship between new feminist theory and feminist practice, both within the academy and in the realm of political organizing.

Fall 2017: WMST UN3311
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WMST 3311 001/03462 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
318 Milbank Hall
Tina Campt 4 21/25

WMST V3312 Theorizing Activism. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Critical Approaches or Feminist Theory or permission of instructor.

Helps students develop and apply useful theoretical models to feminist organizing on local and international levels.  It involves reading, presentations, and seminar reports.  Students use first-hand knowledge of the practices of specific women's activist organizations for theoretical work.

WMST W4301 Early Jewish Women Immigrant Writers: 1900-1939. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Enrollment limited to 15.

Prerequisites: students must attend first day of class and admission will be decided then.

Covers significant pre-Holocaust texts (including Yiddish fiction in translation) by U.S. Ashkenazi women and analyzes the tensions between upholding Jewish identity and the necessity and/or inevitability of integration and assimilation. It also examines women's quests to realize their full potential in Jewish and non-Jewish communities on both sides of the Atlantic.

WMST GU4302 The Second Wave and Jewish Women's Artistic Responses: 1939-1990. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 13 students.

A study of  Jewish women’s fiction, memoirs, art and film in response to the feminist/gender issues raised by the Second Wave. The seminar includes analysis of the writings and artwork of Jo Sinclair, Tillie Olsen, Judy Chicago, Helene Aylon, Elana Dykewomon, Rebecca Goldstein, E.M. Broner and others.

Spring 2018: WMST GU4302
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WMST 4302 001/00295 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
403 Barnard Hall
Irena Klepfisz 4 15/15

WMST W4304 Gender and HIV/AIDS. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 15 students.

An interdisciplinary exploration of feminist approaches to HIV/AIDS with emphasis on the nexus of science and social justice.

WMST W4308 Sexuality and Science. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines scientific research on human sexuality, from early sexology through contemporary studies of biology and sexual orientation, surveys of sexual behavior, and the development and testing of Viagra. How does such research incorporate, reflect, and reshape cultural ideas about sexuality? How is it useful, and for whom?

WMST W4309 Sex, Gender and Transgender Queries. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Sex, sexual identity, and the body are produced in and through time.  “Trans” – as an identity, a set of practices, a question, a site, or as a verb of change and connection – is a relatively new term which this course will situate in theory, time, discipline, and through the study of representation.

WMST W4320 Queer Theories and Histories. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course will cover a range of (mostly U.S. and mostly 20th-Century) materials that thematize gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender experience and identity. We will study fiction and autobiographical texts, historical, psychoanalytic, and sociological materials, queer theory, and films, focusing on modes of representing sexuality and on the intersections between sexuality and race, ethnicity, class, gender, and nationality. We will also investigate connections between the history of LGBT activism and current events. Authors will include Foucault, Freud, Butler, Sedgwick, Anzaldua, Moraga, Smith. Students will present, and then write up, research projects of their own choosing.