Comparative Literature and Translation Studies

http://complit.barnard.edu

320 Milbank Hall
212-854-8312
Administrative Assistant: Sondra Phifer 

Mission

Comparative Literature and Translation Studies at Barnard College is the study of literary and closely related cultural manifestations across linguistic and cultural boundaries. As a program that builds on the strengths and dedication of faculty teaching in various departments across the campus, Comparative Literature is distinct in its conviction that literary and cultural manifestations are best studied in an international context. The program gives students and faculty a unique opportunity to study literature in world contexts and establish intellectually stimulating relations among languages, cultures, and literary traditions, in order to understand the methodical comparison of texts as a fruitful dialogue. Due to our close affiliation with Columbia University, undergraduate students in Comparative Literature can acquire proficiency in a great variety of foreign languages, including some which are presently not taught at Barnard College.

The program enables the student to pursue the study of at least two literatures in two different languages and to explore the possibilities and methods of literary study comparatively across national boundaries. In consultation with her adviser, the student will shape a program that will give her a foundation in her two central literatures (at least one of them in a non-English language) and in one major period, genre, theme, or theoretical issue.

The program is supervised by the Committee on Comparative Literature.

Program Director: Erk Grimm (German)

Professors: Peter T. Connor (French), Helene Foley (Classics), Ross Hamilton (English), Maire Jaanus (English), Alfred MacAdam (Spanish),  Max Moerman (Asian and Middle Eastern Studies), Neferti Tadiar (Women’s Studies), Nancy Worman (Classics)
Associate Professors:  Erk Grimm (German), Maja Horn (Spanish), Nelson Moe (Italian)
Assistant Professors: Rachel Eisendrath (English),  Hana Worthen (Theatre), Orlando Betancor (Spanish)
Senior Lecturers: Anne Boyman (French), Laurie Postlewate (French), Margaret Vandenburg (English)
Lecturers: Linn Mehta (English), Brian O’Keeffe (French)

Requirements for the Major in Comparative Literature

For students who declared in Spring 2017 (and after)

To enter the program, a student must normally have completed the required sequence necessary for entry into the advance literature courses of her major program. This varies from language to language; students should consult the director. Each student, after consultation with the director, chooses an adviser from one of her two fields of concentration in a language. This adviser guides her in developing a sequence of courses appropriate for her goals in the major. 

All students are required to take the following Twelve (12) courses:

  • CPLT BC3001 Introduction to Comparative Literature

  • One (1) course in CPLS BC3143

  • Six (6) Courses Three (3) courses in each of TWO distinct literary traditions studied in the original language 

  • Three (3) elective courses in literature, of which:

    • ​One (1) pre-modern 

    • One (1) literary theory

    • One (1) open choice

  • CPLS BC3997 Senior Seminar

Students who wish to major in Comparative Literature, but who for valid reasons wish to pursue a program at variance with the above model, should consult the director.

Important note about studying abroad

If you plan on spending part or all of junior year abroad, plan to take the CPLT BC3001 Introduction to Comparative Literature during the second semester of your sophomore year. This means contacting the director of Comparative Literature program during the first semester of your sophomore year. Indicate that you plan to be abroad one or both semesters during junior year and discuss when to take core courses such as CLLT GU4300  or CPLS UN3950 .

If you plan to be away for the entire junior year, consider taking CPLS UN3950  in the spring of your senior year or discuss with the program director which other courses can count toward the major when studying abroad. You should also plan to identify advisors before your departure so that you can contact them via e-mail and meet with them at the beginning of your senior year.

If you have further questions regarding the thesis process and its parts, please contact the Program Director.


For students who have declared prior to Spring 2017

To enter the program a student must normally have completed the required sequence necessary for entry into the advance literature courses of her major program. This varies from language to language; students should consult with the chair of the relevant department and with the program director. Each student, after consultation with the director, chooses an adviser from one of her two fields of concentration in a language. This adviser guides her in developing a sequence of courses appropriate for her goals in the major. All students are required to take CPLT BC3001 Introduction to Comparative Literature and fourteen (14) courses normally to be chosen from the following categories:

One course in appropriate classical texts chosen from (CLLT GU4300), RELI V3501 Introduction To the Hebrew Bible, and RELI V3120 Introduction to the New Testament, for those specializing in languages and literature in the Western tradition; Asian Humanities (AHUM UN3399 Colloquium on Major Texts: Middle East and South Asia or AHUM UN1400 Colloquium on Major Texts: East Asia), for those specializing in languages and literatures in Eastern traditions; or other courses with approval of the program director.

One course in literary theory. Students will normally be expected to satisfy this requirement by taking CPLS UN3950 . If study abroad plans make this impossible, other courses may be substituted such as ENGL BC3194 Critical and Theoretical Perspectives on Literature: Marxist Literary Theory or FREN BC3063 Structuralism and Post-Structuralism.

Three courses from each of two literary traditions studied in the original languages. Foreign literature courses must be beyond the introductory level.

Five (5) elective courses in Comparative Literature or Literary Theory (studied in the original or in translation) related to the student's individual program. These courses must be comparative or theoretical in nature; consultation with the director advised.

One course, CPLS BC3997 Senior Seminar. The Senior Thesis must deal with material from at least the two central literatures in the student's major. In addition, this thesis must treat, entirely or in part, the one period, genre, theme, or theoretical issue that has shaped the student's program. The choice of topic for this senior essay and the appointment of a second adviser are determined in consultation with the area adviser and the director of the program. A detailed memorandum on planning the major is available from the advisor and on the Comparative Literature website.

Students who wish to major in Comparative Literature, but who for valid reasons wish to pursue a program at variance with the above model, should consult the director.


Requirements for the Minor in Translation Studies

The Minor in Translation Studies allows students to explore the history and theory of translation practices, to consider the importance of translation in today’s world, and to complete a substantial translation or translation-related project.

The Minor in Translation Studies will not qualify students to work professionally as translators or interpreters upon graduation. The courses on a transcript that count toward the Minor will demonstrate that the student has acquired basic familiarity with the history and principle theories of translation and interpreting, together with sufficient linguistic preparedness to conduct basic practical work in translation or interpreting. It will serve as a useful qualification for those wishing to enter one of the growing number of post-graduate programs that provide further training in translation and interpreting, both areas of significant employment growth. It will serve equally those wishing to pursue research in the area of translation and interpreting, a burgeoning area of academic specialization. For students generally, whatever their career goals, the Minor can be profitably combined with their major (Anthropology, French, Political Science, German, History, etc.), enhancing the value of their degree and making them more competitive in today’s global job market.

The Minor in Translation Studies is supervised by the Director of the Center for Translation Studies along with the Chair of the Program in Comparative Literature. Students wishing to minor in Translation Studies should meet with Professor Peter Connor to discuss the choice of their elective courses.

Six (6) courses are required for the minor:

1. CPLT BC3110 Introduction to Translation Studies 

2. Two or three elective courses dealing with the history and/or theory of translation, or with language from an anthropological, philosophical, psychological, social or cultural perspective. Example courses:

3. One or two language-based courses at the advanced level offering practice in written or oral translation.

  • For example, a student working with French:
  • For example, a student working with Spanish:

4. CPLS BC3510 Advanced Workshop in Translation

Note: the particular courses qualifying for the minor will vary according to the language chosen by the candidate.

With permission of the director of the minor, a student may request credit for an Independent Study involving substantial translation or interpreting work.

CPLT BC3001 Introduction to Comparative Literature. 3 points.

Introduction to the study of literature from a comparative and cross-disciplinary perspective. Readings will be selected to promote reflection on such topics as the relation of literature to the other arts; nationalism and literature; international literary movements; post-colonial literature; gender and literature; and issues of authorship, influence, originality, and intertextuality.

Fall 2018: CPLT BC3001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CPLT 3001 001/02326 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Brian O'Keeffe 3 15/35

CPLT BC3110 Introduction to Translation Studies. 3 points.

Introduction to the major theories and methods of translation in the Western tradition, along with practical work in translating.  Topics include translation in the context of postcolonialism, globalization and immigration, the role of translators in war and zones of conflict, gender and translation, the importance of translation to contemporary writers. Completion of Intermediate II or equivalent in any foreign language.

Fall 2018: CPLT BC3110
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CPLT 3110 001/09674 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Peter Connor 3 123

CPLS BC3120 Poetics of the Mouth. 3 points.

Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

Explores the imagery of eating, drinking, spitting, choking, sucking (and other unmentionables) in relation to insults and excessive behaviors. Readings from Greek poetry (e.g., Homer, Aristophanes) to modern theory (e.g., Kristeva, Powers of Horror, Bakhtin, Rabelais and His World), including modern novels and films.

CPLS BC3123 Friend or Foe? World Literature and the Question of Justice. 3 points.

Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

Prerequisites: CPLS BC3001 Intro to Comp. Lit.; completion of intermediate language courses.

With an emphasis on equality and social justice, this course examines and compares significant 19th c./20th c. literary approaches to friendship as intermediary between individualism and communal life. Discussion of culturally formed concepts and attitudes in modern or postcolonial settings. Reading of Dickens, Hesse, Woolf, Ocampo, Puig, Fugard, Emerson, Derrida, Rawls.

CPLS BC3140 Europe Imagined: Images of the New Europe in 20th-Century Literature. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Compares the diverse images of Europe in 20th-century literature, with an emphasis on the forces of integration and division that shape cultural identity in the areas of travel writings and transculturation/cosmopolitanism; mnemonic narratives and constructions of the past; borderland stories and the cultural politics of translation. Readings include M. Kundera, S. Rushdie, H. Boell, C. Toibin and others.

CPLS BC3142 The Spanish Civil War in Literature and the Visual Arts. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

The Spanish Civil War (1936-39), which culminated with the beginning of Francisco Franco's long dictatorship, foreshadowed the WWII European conflict. It generated unprecedented foreign involvement, as well texts and images by artists from both within and outside Spain - from film (documentary and fictional), through painting (Picasso), to narrative and nonfiction.

CPLT BC3144 Stories and Storytelling: Introduction to Narrative. 3 points.

An introduction to narrative through texts that themselves foreground acts of storytelling and thus teach us how to read them. Readings range across periods and cultures - from fifth-century BCE Athens to late twentieth-century Brazil - and include short stories, novellas, novels, a ballad, film and a psychoanalytic case history. Texts by Conan Doyle, Sophocles, Melville, Hitchcock, Augustine, Coleridge, Freud, McEwan, the tellers and compilers of the The Arabian Nights, Diderot, Flaubert, and Lispector. Emphasis on close reading and hands-on experience in analyzing texts.

CPLS BC3158 Languages of Loss: The Poetry of Mourning. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing

A study of the genre of elegy across time and cultures. Emphasis on how poets express grief and relate to literary traditions. Comparisons of European, Chinese, and American elegies (by Theocritus, Milton, Qu Yuan, Holderlin, Wordsworth, Whitman, Bishop, and others) and discussions of the relationship between singular and collective life.

Spring 2018: CPLS BC3158
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CPLS 3158 001/08723 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
530 Altschul Hall
Emily Sun 3 13/18

CPLS BC3160 Tragic Bodies. 3 points.

Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

This course will focus on embodiment in ancient and modern drama as well as in film, television, and performance art, including plays by Sophocles, Shakespeare, and Beckett; films such as “Rosemary’s Baby” and “The Limits of Control”; and performances by artists such as Karen Finley and Marina Abromovic. We will explore the provocations, theatricality, and shock aesthetics of such concepts as Artaud’s “Theater of Cruelty” and Kristeva's "powers of horror," as well as Adorno's ideas about terror and the sublime.

CPLS BC3162 The Novella from Cervantes to Kafka. 3 points.

The novella, older than the novel, painstakingly crafted, links the worlds of ideas and fiction.  The readings present the novella as a genre, tracing its progress from the 17th century to the 20th.  Each text read in the comparative milieu, grants the reader access to the intellectual concerns of an era.

CPLS BC3170 Translating Madness: The Sciences and Fictions of Pathology. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

Examines the discursive exchanges between fictional and scientific accounts of "madness," with an emphasis on how modern literature renders the new diagnostic discourse and how literary portrayals of "madness" were "translated back" into the diagnostic language of psychology. Discussions revolve around the "medical gaze" and its influence on the writers' literary style, motifs and technique; relevant questions concern interdisciplinary issues such as the relationship between genre and case study; hysteria and sexuality; gender construction and psychoanalysis. Readings include texts by Flaubert, Wilde, Daudet, Sacher-Masoch; excerpts from Freud, Charcot, Foucault, Deleuze; and visual documents.

CPLS BC3510 Advanced Workshop in Translation. 4 points.

Prerequisites: CPLT BC 3110 - Introduction to Translation Studies is a recommended prerequisite.

A deep immersion in the theory and practice of translation with a focus on translating into English. The first half of the course is devoted to discussing readings in the history of translation theory while translating brief practical exercises; in the second half, translation projects are submitted to the class for critical discussion. The foreign texts for these projects, chosen in consultation with the instructor, will be humanistic, not only literature as conventionally defined (prose fiction and poetry, memoir and travel writing), but also the gamut of text types in the human sciences, including philosophy, history, and ethnography. The aim is not just to translate, but to think deeply about translating, to develop writing practices by drawing on the resources of theory, past and present, and by examining translations written by professionals.  In the spring of 2016, the workshop will be offered in two sections by Professor Peter Connor and Professor Emily Sun. The sections will share most of the common readings in the history of translation theory, but Professor Sun's section will emphasize issues specific to translating East Asia. Enrollment in each workshop is limited to 12 students. Admission into the class is by permission of the instructor. CPLT BC 3011 "Introduction to Translation Studies" is a recommended prerequisite, plus, normally, two advanced courses beyond the language requirement in the language from which you intend to translate. Preference will be given to seniors and to comparative literature majors.  Please Email pconnor@barnard.edu by 1 December 2015 with the following information: Name, year of graduation, major, college (BC, CU, etc.); a list of courses you have taken in the language from which you intend to translate; any other pertinent courses you have taken; a brief (max 300 word) statement explaining why you wish to take the workshop (this statement is not required if you have taken or are taking CPLT BC3110 Intro to Translation Studies).

Spring 2018: CPLS BC3510
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CPLS 3510 001/03116 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
207 Milbank Hall
Peter Connor 4 6/12
CPLS 3510 002/08076 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
405 Barnard Hall
Emily Sun 4 9/12

CPLT BC3551 The Arabian Nights and Its Influences. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Completion of one college-level literature course. Permission of instructor.

CPLS BC3630 Theatre and Democracy. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

How does theatre promote democracy, and vice versa: how do concepts and modes of theatre prevent the spectators from assuming civic positions both within and outside a theatrical performance? This class explores both the promotion and the denial of democratic discourse in the practices of dramatic writing and theatrical performance.

CPLS BC3997 Senior Seminar. 4 points.

Designed for students writing a senior thesis and doing advanced research on two central literary fields in the student's major. The course of study and reading material will be determined by the instructor(s) in consultation with students(s).

Spring 2018: CPLS BC3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CPLS 3997 001/08889 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
327 Milbank Hall
Emily Sun 4 4

Cross-Listed Courses

Asian and Middle Eastern Cultures (Barnard)

Classics

CLLT UN3132 Classical Myth. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Survey of major myths from the ancient Near East to the advent of Christianity, with emphasis upon the content and treatment of myths in classical authors (Homer, Hesiod, Aeschylus, Euripides, Sophocles, Vergil, Livy, Ovid).

Fall 2018: CLLT UN3132
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLLT 3132 001/06333 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Helene Foley 3 40/70

East Asian Languages and Cultures

AHUM UN1400 Colloquium on Major Texts: East Asia. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course explores the core classical literature in Chinese, Japanese and Korean Humanities. The main objective of the course is to discover the meanings that these literature offer, not just for the original audience or for the respective cultures, but for us. As such, it is not a survey or a lecture-based course. Rather than being taught what meanings are to be derived from the texts, we explore meanings together, informed by in-depth reading and thorough ongoing discussion.

Spring 2018: AHUM UN1400
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHUM 1400 001/28477 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Hl-2 Heyman Center For Humanities
Conrad Schirokauer 4 24/24
AHUM 1400 002/15398 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
602 Lewisohn Hall
Itsuki Hayashi 4 27/24
AHUM 1400 003/23384 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
101 80 Claremont
Michael Como 4 21/22
Fall 2018: AHUM UN1400
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHUM 1400 001/19259 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Itsuki Hayashi 4 22/22
AHUM 1400 002/05400 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Jue Guo 4 22/22
AHUM 1400 003/75134 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
David Moerman 4 22/22
AHUM 1400 005/24297 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
John Phan 4 22/22
AHUM 1400 006/64054 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Conrad Schirokauer 4 23/24

English (Barnard)

ENGL BC3136 Renaissance Epic. 3 points.

Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

The epic tradition raises crucial questions about the interrelationship of literature and power. In telling the story of war and empire building, how does epic both promote and also challenge the cause of the winner? How does epic preserve a space for more lyrical forms of subjectivity? What does this literary form tell about the role of women, the nameless majority and the global ‘other' in the West? In this course, we will trace the European epic tradition, studying Homer's Iliad, Virgil's Aeneid, Spenser's The Faerie Queene and Milton's Paradise Lost. Finally, we will read a contemporary poet's reflection on this tradition, Alice Oswald's Memorial: An Excavation of the Iliad.

ENGL BC3158 Medieval Literature: Literatures of Medieval Britain. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

It's easy to forget that medieval literature wasn't always old and "quaint" as it seems to many of us today. For writers and artists of that era, they were modern, too. But they also imagined their own past and (like many of us) they often had a nostalgic yearning for that lost time. This course will explore a number of forms of medieval literature, mostly British but also some continental, as it explores versions of its past, and especially the ultimately tragic story of King Arthur. We will read across many medieval genres, including some little known today, like lives of saints. But the course will focus on narratives of quest: heroic, psychological, and erotic. We will also explore some of the often beautiful medieval manuscripts in which these texts were often copied. We will read most Middle English texts in the original language; we'll study French and Latin texts in translation.

ENGL BC3171 The Novel and Psychoanalysis. 3 points.

Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

The novel in its cultural context, with an accent on psychoanalysis (but no required reading).  Austen, Emily Bronte, Dickens, Hardy, D.H. Lawrence, Didion, Duras, and W.G. Sebald.

ENGL BC3187 American Writers and Their Foreign Counterparts. 3 points.

Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

Developments in modern literature as seen in selected 19th- and 20th-century American, European, and English works by Flaubert, James, Proust, Joyce, Chekhov, Porter, Cather, Ibsen, O'Neill, Fitzgerald, Rilke, and others.

ENGL BC3190 Global Literature in English. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

  Selective survey of fiction from the ex-colonies, focusing on the colonial encounter, cultural and political decolonization, and belonging and migration in the age of postcolonial imperialism. Areas covered include Africa (Achebe, Aidoo, Armah, Ngugi); the Arab World (Mahfouz, Munif, Salih, Souief); South Asia (Mistry, Rushdie, Suleri); the Carribean (Kincaid); and New Zealand (Hulme).

ENGL BC3192 Exile and Estrangement in Global Literature. 4 points.

Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

"I would never be part of anything. I would never really belong anywhere, and I knew it, and all my life would be the same, trying to belong, and failing. Always something would go wrong. I am a stranger and I always will be, and after all I didn't really care."-Jean Rhys. This course examines the experiential life of the novelist as both artist and citizen. Through the study of the work of two towering figures in 20th century literature, we will look at the seemingly contradictory condition of the novelist as both outsider and integral to society, as both observer and expresser of time's yearnings and passions. In different ways and with different repercussions, Jean Rhys and Albert Camus were born into realities shaped by colonialism. They lived across borders, identities and allegiances. Rhys was neither black-Caribbean nor white-English. Albert Camus could be said to have been both French and Algerian, both the occupier and the occupied, and, perhaps, neither. We will look at how their work reflects the contradictions into which they were born. We will trace, through close reading and open discussion, the ways in which their art continues to have lasting power and remain, in light of the complexities of our own time, vivid, true and alive. The objective is to pinpoint connections between novelistic form and historical time. The uniqueness of the texts we will read lies not just in their use of narrative, ideas and myths, but also in their resistance to generalization. We will examine how our novelists' existential position, as both witnesses and participants, creates an opportunity for fiction to reveal more than the author intends and, on the other hand, more than power desires.

ENRE BC3810 Literary Approaches to the Bible. 4 points.

Interpretive strategies for reading the Bible as a work with literary dimensions. Considerations of poetic and rhetorical structures, narrative techniques, and feminist exegesis will be included. Topics for investigation include the influence of the Bible on literature.

Spring 2018: ENRE BC3810
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENRE 3810 001/00952 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
530 Altschul Hall
Margaret Ellsberg 4 13/14

French (Barnard)

FREN UN3420 Introduction To French and Francophone Studies I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: FREN UN3405 Advanced Grammar and Composition or an AP score of 5 or the director of undergraduate studies' permission.

Examines conceptions of culture and civilization in France from the Enlightenment to the Exposition Coloniale of 1931, with an emphasis on the historical development and ideological foundations of French colonialism. Authors and texts include: the Encyclopédie; the Déclaration des droits de l'homme et du citoyen; the Code noir; Diderot; Chateaubriand; Tocqueville; Claire de Duras; Renan; Gobineau; Gauguin; Drumont.

Fall 2018: FREN UN3420
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FREN 3420 001/16086 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Katherine Raichlen 3 20/20

FREN UN3421 Introduction To French and Francophone Studies II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: FREN UN3405 Advanced Grammar and Composition or an AP score of 5 or the director of undergraduate studies' permission.

Universalism vs. exceptionalism, tradition vs. modernity, integration and exclusion, racial, gender, regional, and national identities are considered in this introduction to the contemporary French-speaking world in Europe, the Americas, and Africa. Authors include: Aimé Césaire, Léopold Sedar Senghor, Frantz Fanon, Maryse Condé.

Spring 2018: FREN UN3421
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FREN 3421 001/13552 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
644 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Anais Maurer 3 16/19

German (Barnard)

GERM BC3224 Germany's Traveling Cultures. 3 points.

Examines accounts of traveling or living in South America, Africa, and Germany from a postcolonial and transnational perspective. Discussion of German explorers, colonialism, global tourism, multiculturalism, focusing on the relationship between mobility and the formation of African, Jewish, Turkish bicultural identities in different historical contexts and geographical settings. Close attention to the role of language, ideology, and itinerary in visual, aural, and written records by A.v.Humboldt, Merian, J. Baker, Massaquoi, Wackwitz, Oezdamar, Akin. [In English]

Linguistics

LING UN3101 Introduction to Linguistics. 3 points.

An introduction to the study of language from a scientific perspective. The course is divided into three units: language as a system (sounds, morphology, syntax, and semantics), language in context (in space, time, and community), and language of the individual (psycholinguistics, errors, aphasia, neurology of language, and acquisition). Workload: lecture, weekly homework, and final examination. 

Fall 2018: LING UN3101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LING 3101 001/74355 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
John McWhorter 3 150/150

Slavic languages

RUSS UN3220 Literature and Empire: The Reign of the Novel in Russia (19th Century) [In English]. 3 points.

Explores the aesthetic and formal developments in Russian prose, especially the rise of the monumental 19th-century novel, as one manifestation of a complex array of national and cultural aspirations, humanistic and imperialist ones alike. Works by Pushkin, Lermonotov, Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov. Knowledge of Russian not required.

CLRS GU4040 The Future is Red (White and Blue): Modernity and Social Justice in U.S. and U.S.S.R.. 4 points.

In the 1920s, the Soviet Union and the U.S. emerged as growing world powers, offering each other two compelling, if often opposed, versions of modernity. At the same time, each country saw its intercontinental rival as an attractive, but dangerous “other”: a counterexample of the road not taken, and a foil for its own ideology and identity. From the 1920s to the heat of the Cold War, Some of the USSR’s most prominent public figures came to the U.S. and several American intellectuals, progressive activists, and officials traveled to the Soviet experiment. This course examines the cultural images of the American and Soviet “other” in the texts that resulted from these exchanges. We will read works about America from Sergei Esenin, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Ilya Il'f and Evgeny Petrov, and poems, essays, and novels about Russia by Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Louise Bryant, W.E.B. Du Bois, John Steinbeck, and others. Each of these texts attempts to grapple with what it means to be modern—both technologically advanced and socially liberated—in different national contexts and under different proclaimed ideologies. 

Spring 2018: CLRS GU4040
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLRS 4040 001/07225 W 4:00pm - 6:00pm
303 Altschul Hall
Bradley Gorski 4 7/20

Spanish and Latin American Cultures (Barnard)

SPAN UN3265 Latin American Literature in Translation. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Study of contemporary Latin American narrative; its origins and apotheosis. Readings include Machado de Assis, Borges, Garcia Marquez, Puig, and others.

Spring 2018: SPAN UN3265
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3265 001/07881 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Ll103 Diana Center
Alfred Mac Adam 3 36

Theatre (Barnard)

THTR UN3150 Western Theatre Traditions: Classic to Romantic. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Dialectical approach to reading and thinking about the history of dramatic theatre in the west, interrogating the ways poetry inflects, and is inflected by, the material dynamics of performance. We will undertake careful study of the practices of performance, and of the sociocultural, economic, political, and aesthetic conditions animating representative plays of the Western tradition from the classical theatre through the early modern period to early romanticism; course will also emphasize development of important critical concepts for the analysis of drama, theatre, and performance. Specific attention will be given to classical Athens, medieval cycle drama, the professional theatre of early modern England, the rival theatres of seventeenth century France and Spain, and eighteenth-century theatre in England and Germany; topics include the sociology of theatre, the impact of print on conceptions of performance, representing gender and race, and the dynamics of court performance. Writing: 2-3 papers; Reading: 1-2 plays, critical and historical reading per week; final examination. Fulfills one (of two) Theatre History requirements for Theatre/Drama and Theatre Arts majors.

Fall 2018: THTR UN3150
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
THTR 3150 001/06594 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
William Worthen 3 35

THTR UN3166 Drama, Theatre, and Theory. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Intensive immersion in fundamental principles and practices of world drama, theatre, and performance, past and present. Close readings of performances, plays, video, film, and digital media.  Assignments include presentations, performance projects, and critical writing. Fulfills one course in Drama, Theatre, and Theory requirement for Theatre/Drama and Theatre Arts majors.