Anthropology

http://anthropology.barnard.edu/

411 Milbank Hall
212-854-9389 / 5428
anthropology.barnard.edu

The Discipline of Anthropology

Anthropology examines the social worlds people create and inhabit.  It is a comparative discipline that takes seriously the differences between societies across the globe and through time. Historically, anthropologists studied non-European societies, describing their social and linguistic systems, their patterns of thought and culture and by doing so they aimed to throw into relief the contingency of normative Western assumptions. 

Contemporary anthropology examines a very different landscape.  It seeks to examine not just the diversity of cultural practices but to understand how societies clash, mutually interact and are interconnected through movements of goods, people, ideas, culture and politics.  Anthropology today is thus more genuinely cross-cultural than it once was.  Anthropologists conduct research with urban New Yorkers as often as with Mayan peasants, with genetic scientists as much as with spirit adepts and seek to understand the increasingly complex interconnections of people around the world.

The Department of Anthropology

Our faculty specialize in science and medicine, technology and media, religion, language and cognition, visual and material culture, colonialism and postcolonialism, and conservation and the environment.  We conduct research in Africa, the U.S., Oceania, the Middle East and Latin America and in doing so we use a variety of foci, tacking between the immediacy of local modes of lived experience and broader social and political transformations.

Mission

Anthropology seeks to prepare students to succeed in a globalized world.  It provides them with the skills to identify problems in intercultural settings, to recognize alternative lived realities, to discuss solutions with colleagues of diverse backgrounds, and to communicate those solutions to broader publics.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon successfully completing the major, students should be able to attain the following outcomes:

  • Articulate key methodological and theoretical debates in the history of the discipline;
  • Compare and use distinct analytical frameworks for interpreting meaningful social behavior, detecting patterns and thinking comparatively across social domains, cultures and contexts;
  • Develop an anthropological sensibility that enables one to distill social meaning from everyday encounters with individuals, material objects, texts and other social phenomena;
  • Undertake ethnographic, linguistic or archaeological fieldwork using the appropriate methods;
  • Conceptualize, undertake, and present an original research project by the end of the senior year.

The department also cooperates with related programs such as Africana Studies, American Studies, Human Rights, Urban Studies, and Women’s Studies. Arrangements for combined, double, joint, and special majors are made in consultation with the chair.

Chair: Paige West (Tow Professor)
Professors: Nadia Abu El-Haj, Lesley Sharp (Ann Whitney Olin Professor)
Associate Professors: Severin Fowles, Brian Larkin (Tow Associate Professor)
Assistant Professors: Sarah Muir, Stephen K. Scott, Adam S. Watson
Professors Emeriti: Abraham Rosman, Nan Rothschild, Paula G. Rubel, Judith Shapiro, Joan Vincent

Other officers of the University offering courses listed below:

Professors: Lila Abu-Lughod, Partha Chatterjee, Myron Cohen, Terence D’Altroy, E. Valentine Daniel, Nicholas Dirks, Ralph Holloway, Mahmood Mamdani, Don J. Melnick, Brinkley Messick, Rosalind Morris, Elizabeth Povinelli, David Scott, Michael Taussig
Research Professor: Nan Rothschild
Associate Professors: Elaine Combs-Schilling, Marina Cords, Steven Gregory, Marilyn Ivy, John Pemberton
Assistant Professors: Zoe Crossland, Catherine Fennell, Hlonipha Mokoena, Audra Scripsen
Lecturers: Karen Seeley, Pegi Vail

Requirements for the Major

Every major is urged to acquire a general knowledge of three of the four fields of anthropology (social and linguistic anthropology, archaeology, and physical anthropology) and of their interrelationship. To this end, the student’s program should be designed in consultation with her adviser as soon as possible after the declaration of the major. Continuing and frequent meetings with the adviser are encouraged.

Eleven courses are required for the major, including:

ANTH V1002The Interpretation of Culture3
Select one of the following introductory courses:3
The Origins of Human Society
The Rise of Civilization
Intro to Language and Culture
Human Origins & Evolution
ANTH V3040Anthropological Theory I4
ANTH V3041Anthropological Theory II4
ANTH BC3871Senior Thesis Seminar: Problems in Anthropological Research (Offered Fall Semester)4
ANTH BC3872Senior Thesis Seminar: Problems in Anthropological Research (Offered Spring Semester)4

Select five electives, one of which can be a third introductory level class and three of which must be 3000 level or higher.  Moreover, the three 3000 level or higher seminars must be taken at Barnard or Columbia (not while on an exchange program during junior year).

In consultation with advisers, programs will be designed to reflect the students’ interests and plans—whether they intend to go on to graduate studies in anthropology or expect to enter other fields.

It is recommended that students who plan to major and in socio-cultural anthropology take ANTH BC3868 Ethnographic Field Research in New York City (y) before their senior year. Many seniors choose to incorporate a fieldwork component in their thesis research and having some experience of field methods is extremely important. Those interested in other sub-disciplines may wish to take this or another “methods” course and should consult their advisers. Students are also encouraged to check listings for courses offered by EEEB at Columbia for possible Anthropology credit, in consultation with the Barnard department chair.

Senior Essay

All students majoring in Anthropology are required to submit an essay of substantial length and scholarly depth. Such a paper will usually be written during the course of ANTH BC3871 Senior Thesis Seminar: Problems in Anthropological ResearchANTH BC3872 Senior Thesis Seminar: Problems in Anthropological Research).

Double and Joint Majors

Students doing a double or joint major in Anthropology and another subject are required to register for at least one semester of ANTH BC3871 Senior Thesis Seminar: Problems in Anthropological ResearchANTH BC3872 Senior Thesis Seminar: Problems in Anthropological Research.

Requirements for the Minor

The minor consists of five courses:
ANTH V1002The Interpretation of Culture
Select one of the following introductory courses:
The Origins of Human Society
The Rise of Civilization
Intro to Language and Culture
Human Origins & Evolution
Select three other Anthropology courses two of which must be 3000 level

Course Offerings:

ANTH V1002 The Interpretation of Culture. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required
Registration for discussion sections will occur during the first week of class.

The anthropological approach to the study of culture and human society. Case studies from ethnography are used in exploring the universality of cultural categories (social organization, economy, law, belief system, art, etc.) and the range of variation among human societies. 

Fall 2014: ANTH V1002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 1002 001/04478 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
304 Barnard Hall
Sarah Muir 3 118/120

ANTH V1007 The Origins of Human Society. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

Examines the grand sweep of human development from our first bipedal steps some six million years ago, to the earliest evidence of art and symbolism, and on to the emergence of the first agricultural villages. Given the immensity of time under consideration, emphasis is placed on those heightened periods of change commonly described as "revolutions". Participants will become familiar with the fossil and/or archaeological records or those revolutions and the competing theories of why they occurred. 

Fall 2014: ANTH V1007
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 1007 001/62549 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
405 Milbank Hall
3 57/60

ANTH V1008 The Rise of Civilization. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement, Lab Required
Mandatory Recitations sections and $25.00 laboratory fee. Enrollment limited to 150.

DO NOT REGISTER FOR A RECITATION SECTION IF YOU ARE NOT OFFICIALLY REGISTERED FOR THE COURSE. The rise of major civilization in prehistory and protohistory throughout the world, from the initial appearance of sedentism, agriculture, and social stratification through the emergence of the archaic empires. Description and analysis of a range of regions that were centers of significant cultural development: Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus River Valley, China, North America, and Mesoamerica.

ANTH V1009 Intro to Language and Culture. 3 points.

This course explores the relationship between language and other socio-­cultural processes, introducing students to classical and contemporary perspectives on “language” in the field of Linguistic Anthropology. Course readings are balanced between theoretical, programmatic, and empirical, ethnographic studies. Enrollment limit is 60.

Fall 2014: ANTH V1009
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 1009 001/09332 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
328 Milbank Hall
Stephen Scott 3 60/60

ANTH V3040 Anthropological Theory I. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Enrollment limited to 30.

Prerequisites: Required of all Barnard Anthropology majors; open to other students with instructor's permission only. * To be taken in conjunction with ANTH V3041, preferably in sequence.

First of a two semester sequence intended to introduce departmental majors to key readings in social theory that have been constitutive of the rise and contemporary practice of modern anthropology. The goal is to understand historical and current intellectual debates within the discipline. 

Fall 2014: ANTH V3040
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3040 001/09257 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
324 Milbank Hall
Sarah Muir 4 26/30

ANTH V3041 Anthropological Theory II. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Enrollment limited to 40.

Prerequisites: Required of all Barnard Anthropology majors; open to other students with instructor's permission only.

The second of a two semester sequence intended to introduce departmental majors to key readings in social theory that have been constitutive of the rise and contemporary practice of modern anthropology. The goal is to understand historical and current intellectual debates within the discipline. To be taken in conjunction with ANTH V3040, preferably in sequence. 

ANTH BC3871 Senior Thesis Seminar: Problems in Anthropological Research. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Limited to Barnard Anthropology Seniors.

Offered every Fall. Discussion of research methods and planning and writing of a Senior Essay in Anthropology will accompany research on problems of interest to students, culminating in the writing of individual Senior Essays. The advisory system requires periodic consultation and discussion between the student and her adviser as well as the meeting of specific deadlines set by the department each semester.  Limited to Barnard Senior Anthropology Majors.

Fall 2014: ANTH BC3871
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3871 001/07710 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
214 Milbank Hall
Brian Larkin, Adam Watson, Stephen Scott 4 26

ANTH BC3872 Senior Thesis Seminar: Problems in Anthropological Research. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Must complete ANTH BC3871x. Limited to Barnard Senior Anthropology Majors.

Offered every Spring. Discussion of research methods and planning and writing of a Senior Essay in Anthropology will accompany research on problems of interest to students, culminating in the writing of individual Senior Essays. The advisory system requires periodic consultation and discussion between the student and her adviser as well as the meeting of specific deadlines set by the department each semester.

EEEB V1010 Human Origins & Evolution. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, Recitation Section Required

Lab fee: $25. This is an introductory course in human evolution. Building on a foundation of evolutionary theory, students explore primate behavioral morphology and then trace the last 65 million years of primate evolution from the earliest Paleocene forms to the fossil remains of earliest humans and human relatives. Along with Behavioral Biology of the Living Primates this serves as a core required class for the EBHS program. [Taught every fall.]

Fall 2014: EEEB V1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 1010 001/67980 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
602 Hamilton Hall
Jill Shapiro 3 52

ANTH V3861 Anthropology of the Anthropocene. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20. Priority given to majors in Anthropology.

This course focuses on the political ecology of the Anthropocene. As multiple publics become increasingly aware of the extensive and accelerated rate of current global environmental change, and the presence of anthropogenesis in ever expanding circumstances, we need to critically analyze the categories of thought and action being developed in order to carefully approach this change. Our concern is thus not so much the Anthropocene as an immutable fact, inevitable event, or definitive period of time (significant though these are), but rather for the political, social, and intellectual consequences of this important idea. Thus we seek to understand the creativity of "The Anthropocene" as a political, rhetorical, and social category. We also aim to examine the networks of capital and power that have given rise to the current state of planetary change, the strategies for ameliorating those changes, and how these are simultaneously implicated in the rhetorical creation of "The Anthropocene". 

ANTH V3810 Madagascar. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., Discussion Section Required

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor's permission required. Anthropology, African Studies, and Francophone Studies students encouraged to enroll.

Critiques the many ways the great Red Island has been described and imagined by explorers, colonists, social scientists, and historians - as an Asian-African amalgamation, an ecological paradise, and a microcosm of the Indian Ocean. Religious diasporas, mercantilism, colonization, enslavement, and race and nation define key categories of comparative analysis.

Fall 2014: ANTH V3810
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3810 001/05459 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
227 Milbank Hall
Lesley Sharp 4 5/15

ANTH V3873 Language and Politics. 4 points.

Language is central to political process. While all agree that language is used to symbolize or express political action, the main focus of this course is on how language and other communicative practices contribute to the creation of political stances, events, and forms of order. Topics addressed include political rhetoric and ritual; political communication and publics; discrimination and hierarchy; language and the legitimation of authority; as well as the role of language in nationalism, state formation, and in other sociopolitical movements, like feminism and diasporic communities. Since this course has the good fortune of coinciding with the 2012 U.S. Presidential election, we will make significant use of campaign rhetorics as a means of illustrating and exploring various themes. 

Fall 2014: ANTH V3873
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3873 001/04318 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
308 Diana Center
Stephen Scott 4 22/25

ANTH V3660 Gender, Culture, and Human Rights. 4 points.

ANTH BC3868 Ethnographic Field Research in New York City. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

Prerequisites: Recommended for majors prior to the senior year. Open to non-majors by permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

A seminar-practicum on field research in New York City. Exploration of anthropological field research methods followed by supervised individual field research on selected topics in urban settings.

ANTH V3917 Social Theory and Radical Critique in Ethnic Studies. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

ANTH V3921 Anticolonialism. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Enrollment limited to 20.

Through a careful exploration of the argument and style of five vivid anticolonial texts, Mahatma Gandhi's Hind Swaraj, C.L.R. James' The Black Jacobins, Aimé Césaire's Discourse on Colonialism, Albert Memmi's Colonizer and Colonized, and Frantz Fanon's The Wretched of the Earth, this course aims to inquire into the construction of the image of colonialism and its projected aftermaths established in anti-colonial discourse. 

Fall 2014: ANTH V3921
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3921 001/61981 M 11:00am - 12:50pm
467 Schermerhorn Hall
David Scott 4 20/20

ANTH V3922 The Emergence of State. 4 points.

The creation of the earliest states out of simpler societies was a momentous change in human history. This course examines major theories proposed to account for that process, including population pressure, warfare, urbanism, class conflict, technological innovation, resource management, political conflict and cooperation, economic specialization and exchange, religion/ideology, and information processing.

Fall 2014: ANTH V3922
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3922 001/65562 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
963 Schermerhorn Hall
Terence D'Altroy 4 4/25

ANTH V3939 The Anime Effect: Media and Technoculture in Japan. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission

Culture, technology, and media in contemporary Japan. Theoretical and ethnographic engagements with forms of mass mediation, including anime, manga, video, and cell-phone novels. Considers larger global economic and political contexts, including post-Fukushima transformations.

Fall 2014: ANTH V3939
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3939 001/87448 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
467 Schermerhorn Hall
Marilyn Ivy 4 14

ANTH V3949 Sorcery and Magic. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

In considering philosophical, aesthetic, and political aspects of sorcery in contemporary and historical settings, the course also considers the implications of postmodernism for anthropological theorizing as itself a form of sorcery. 

Fall 2014: ANTH V3949
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3949 001/72843 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
467 Schermerhorn Hall
Michael Taussig 4 20/32

ANTH V3970 Biological Basis of Human Variation. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.

Prerequisites: ANEB V1010 and the instructor's permission.

Biological evidence for the modern human diversity at the molecular, phenotypical, and behavioral levels, as distributed geographically.

Fall 2014: ANTH V3970
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3970 001/64024 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
467 Schermerhorn Hall
Ralph Holloway 4 1/12

ANTH V3977 Trauma. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Investing trauma from interdisciplinary perspectives, the course explores connections between the interpersonal, social, and political events that precipitate traumatic reactions and their individual and collective ramifications. After examining the consequences of political repression and violence, the spread of trauma within and across communities, the making of memories and flashbacks, and the role of public testimony and psychotherapy in alleviating traumatic reactions.

ANTH V3979 Fluent Bodies. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

The recent proliferation of writings on the social significations of the human body have brought to the fore the epistemological, disciplinary, and ideological structures that have participated in creating a dimension of the human body that goes beyond its physical consideration. The course, within the context of anthropology, has two considerations, a historical one and a contemporary one. If anthropology can be construed as the study of human society and culture, then, following Marcel Mauss, this study must be considered the actual, physical bodies that constitute the social and the cultural.

ANTH V3980 Nationalism. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Intended for seniors, but not necessarily anthropology majors.

This course will cover the basic readings in the contemporary debate over nationalism. It will cover different disciplinary approaches and especially look at recent studies of nationalism in the formerly colonial world as well as in the industrial West. The readings will offer a mix of both theoretical and empirical studies. The readings include the following: 1) Eric Hobsbawm's Nationalism since 1780; 2) Ernest Gillner's Nations and Nationalism; 3) Benedict Anderson's Imagined Communities; 4) Anthony Smith's The Ethnic Origins of Nations; 5) Linda Coley's Britons; 6) Peter Sahlins's Boundaries; and 7) Partha Chatterjee's The Nation and Its Fragments

Fall 2014: ANTH V3980
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3980 001/64289 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
401 Hamilton Hall
Partha Chatterjee 4 14

ANTH W4065 Archaeology of Idols. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

Explores 40,000 years of the human creation of, entanglement with, enchantment by, and violence towards idols. Case studies roam from the Paleolithic to Petra and from the Hopi to the Taliban, and the theoretical questions posed include the problem of representation, iconoclasm, fetishism and the sacred.

Cross-Listed Courses:

Africana Studies (Barnard)

AFRS BC3556 Ethnography of Black America. 4 points.

This course critically examines ethnographic texts about Blacks in the United States, focusing as much on what they proffer about Black American culture as on the various socio-political contexts in which this body of scholarship has been produced. The goal is to advance an understanding of the larger social forces undergirding the production not only of formations of Black culture, but of knowledge about Black America. A further goal is to foster a critical understanding of the anthropological enterprise itself.

Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology

EEEB W4700 Race: The Tangled History of a Biological Concept. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. EBHS students have priority at first class session.

From Aristotle to the 2020 US census, this course examines the history of race as a biological concept.  It explores the complex relationship between the scientific study of biological differences-real, imagined, or invented and the historical and cultural factors involved in the development and expression of "racial ideas." Scientific background not required.  Enrollment limited to 15; EBHS majors/concentrators have priority at first class session. [Additional hour for film screenings weekly in second half of the semester--attendance at films is mandatory.] Please note that this course DOES NOT fulfillment the SC requirement at the College or GS.

Fall 2014: EEEB W4700
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 4700 001/26339 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
956 Schermerhorn Hall
Jill Shapiro 4 13/15

Other Offerings Not Taught This Year: 

ANTH V3853 Moving Truths: The Anthropology of Transnational Advocacy Networks. 4 points.

Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

Transnational advocacy is an increasingly important dimension of contemporary globalizations, reconfiguring relations of knowledge, power, and possibility across cultures and societies. As sites for enacting expertise, activism, and legality, transnational advocacy networks are crucial for not only making claims and causes mobile across locales, but for making hem moving within locales -- affective and effective. While transnational advocacy networks are often studied by political scientists, this course focuses on a growing body of anthropological and ethnographic research.

ANTH V3015 Chinese Society. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

Social organization and social change in China from late imperial times to the present. Major topics include family, kinship, community, stratification, and the relationships between the state and local society.

ANTH V3044 Symbolic Anthropology. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

Exploration of the manner in which various anthropologists have constructed “culture” as being constituted of a set of conventional signs called “symbols” and the consequences of such a construal. Among the authors read are the anthropologists Valentine Daniel, Mary Douglas, Clifford Geertz, Claude Levi-Strauss, Sherry Ortner, David Schneider, Margaret Trawick, and Victor Turner; the social theorists Emile Durkheim, Karl Marx, and Max Weber; the semioticians Ferdinand de Saussure and Charles Peirce; and the psychoanalysts Sigmund Freud and Jacques Lacan. 

ANTH V3055 Strategy of Archaeology. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

ANTH W3201 Introductory Survey of Biological Anthropology. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

ANTH V3300 Pre-Columbian Histories of Native America. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Enrollment limited to 40.Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

This course explores 10,000 years of the North American archaeological record, bringing to light the unwritten histories of Native Americans prior to European contact. Detailed consideration of major pre-Columbian sites is interwoven with the insight of contemporary native peoples to provide both a scientific and humanist reconstruction of the past. 

ANTH V3525 Introduction to South Asian History and Culture. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

Examines four major aspects of contemporary South Asian societies: nationalism, religious reform, gender, and caste. Provides a critical survey of the history of and continuing debates over these critical themes of society, politics, and culture in South Asia. Readings consist of primary texts that were part of the original debates and secondary sources that represent the current scholarly assessment on these subjects. 

ANTH V3700 Colloquium: Anthropological Research Problems in Complex Societies. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

ANTH V3820 Theory and Method in Archaeology. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

ANTH V3824 Fantasy, Film, and Fiction in Archaeology. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

ANTH V3903 Cities: Ethnoarchaeology, Archaeology and Theory. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20, plus instructor's permission required.Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

This course will examine cities in comparative perspective, over time and space, from several viewpoints. We will examine how and when they develop, how they function, and what urban life is like. Is the urban experience the same for all residents? At all times? In all places? We will begin with theory and some urban history and then focus on New York as a laboratory, from its origins to the present. The course involves a kind of archaeology called "ethnoarchaeology" in which we look at living societies and communities in order to gain a better understanding of past and present. Our examination of contemporary urban life pays special attention to spatial organization and order, the geography of power in the urban landscape, and to material things, as these are the kinds of data that archaeologists typically focus on.

ANTH V3913 Ancient Egyptian Culture. 4 points.

Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

Ancient Egypt was one of the most advanced cultures in antiquity. This course will go beyond the pyramids and pharaohs to investigate the culture and daily life of the ancient Egyptians from the Old Kingdom to the Hellenistic period. Students will learn about ancient Egyptian magic, emotion, cosmogony, education, recreation, travel, and diplomacy by reading ancient Egyptian folklore, dream spells, love poetry, wisdom texts, religious hymns, and royal propaganda in translation. In addition to exploring the laws, occupations, and medical knowledge of the ancient Egyptians, we will also analyze how gender, race, sexuality, class, and disability were constructed and represented.

ANTH V3920 Economy and Society in Prehistory. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Enrollment limited to 15.Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Archaeology or permission of the instructor required.

       

ANTH V3940 Ethnographies of the Mid East. 4 points.

Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

Prerequisites: Previous enrollment in an Anthropology course. Sophomore standing. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Explores the themes that have shaped ethnographic literature of the Middle East. These include topics such as colonialism, gender, Islam, nationalism and the nation-state.

ANTH V3943 Youth and Identity Politics in Africa. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Enrollment limited to 15.Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor is required.

Examines ways in which African youth inevitably occupy two extremes in academic writings and the mass media: as victims of violence, or as instigators of social chaos. Considers youth as generating new cultural forms, as historically relevant actors, and informed social and/or political critics. At the core of such critiques lie possibilities for the agentive power of youth in Africa. 

ANTH V3946 African Popular Culture. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Enrollment limited to 15.Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor required.

       

ANTH V3947 Text, Magic, Performance. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This course pursues interconnections linking text and performance in light of magic, ritual, possession, narration, and related articulations of power. Readings are drawn from classic theoretical writings, colonial fiction, and ethnographic accounts. Domains of inquiry include: spirit possession, trance states, séance, witchcraft, ritual performance, and related realms of cinematic projection, musical form, shadow theater, performative objects, and (other) things that move on their own, compellingly. Key theoretical concerns are subjectivity - particularly, the conjuring up and displacement of self in the form of the first-person singular "I" - and the haunting power of repetition. Retraced throughout the course are the uncanny shadows of a fully possessed subject. 

ANTH V3951 Pirates, Boys, and Capitalism. 4 points.

ANTH V3952 Taboo and Transgression. 4 points.

Enrollment is limited to 33.Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

The transgression of taboos is the basis of crime, sex, and religion in any society. As "the labor of the negative", transgression is also a critical element in thought itself. Working through anthropology of sacrifice and obscenity, as well as relevant work by Bataille, Foucault, and Freud, this course aims at understanding why taboos exist and why they must be broken. 

ANTH V3961 Subsequent Performances. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Enrollment limited to 15.Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Priority given to upper class Anthropology and Music majors; students must attend operas outside of class.

Explores the dynamic interaction between operatic compositions (especially Mozart's Don Giovanni and The Marriage of Figaro) and their subsequent performances, with particular emphasis on the cultural, political, and economic contexts that shape both the original composition and the following reproductions. Critical apparatus includes Abbate and Butler.

ANTH V3962 History and Memory. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

ANTH V3975 Anthropology of Media. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Enrollment limited to 16.Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

            Provides a critical overview of the theoretical engagement between anthropology and media theory. It explores the relationship between technologies and transformations in ideas of time, space, and sociability; and examines what it means to live in a mediated society.

ANTH V3983 Ideas and Society in the Caribbean. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.

Focusing on the Anglo-Creole Caribbean, this course examines some aspects of popular culture, literary expression, political change, and intellectual movements over the past thirty years.

ANTH V3988 Race/Sexuality Science and Social Practice. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 26.Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Scientific inquiry has configured race and sex in distinctive ways. This class will engage critical theories of race and feminist considerations of sex, gender, and sexuality through the lens of the shifting ways in which each has been conceptualized, substantiated, classified, and managed in (social) science and medicine.

ANTH V3993 World Archaeologies/Global Perspectives. 4 points.

Prerequisites: At least one of the following: ANTH V1007, ANTH V1008, or ACLG V2028; and the instructor's permission.

This capstone seminar explores the archaeology of the modern world from a postcolonial perspective. It addresses key theoretical issues in historical archaeology, and considers case studies in the recent archaeology of Africa and the Americas. The seminar has a particular focus on questions of ethics, heritage, and indigenous perspectives in the practice of archaeology. It fulfills the major seminar requirement for the archaeology major.

ANTH V3994 Anthropology of Extremity: War. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

ANHS W4001 The Ancient Empires. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

This course provides a comparative study of five of the world’s most prominent ancient empires: Assyria, Egypt, Rome, the Aztecs, and the Inkas.  The developmental histories of those polities, and their essential sociopolitical, economic, and ideological features, are examined in light of theories of the nature of early empires and methods of studying them.

ANTH W4002 Controversial Topics in Human Evolution. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

Prerequisites: an introductory biological/physical anthropology course and the instructor's permission.

Controversial issues that exist in current biological/physical anthropology, and controversies surrounding the descriptions and theories about particular fossil hominid discoveries, such as the earliest australopithecines, the diversity of Homo erectus, the extinction of the Neandertals, and the evolution of culture, language, and human cognition.

ANTH W4011 Critical Social Theory. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Enrollment limited to 30.Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

Prerequisites: junior standing.

     

ANTH W4022 Political Ecology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Analyzes global, national, and local environment issues from the critical perspectives of political ecology. Explores themes like the production of nature, environmental violence, environmental justice, political decentralization, territoriality, the state, and the conservation interventions.

ANTH W4625 Anthropology and Film. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

ANTH V3899 Food, Ecology, Globalization. 4 points.

Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

Prerequisites: permission of instructors.

Examines the social, ecological, and political-economic roles of what and how we eat from a global perspective. Explores these intersections through significant major changes in food through human history and across cultures as well as through key food commodities such as specific grains, pluses, and fruit.

EEEB W3204 Dynamics of Human Evolution. 4 points.

Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

Prerequisites: When taught by Shapiro, prerequisite of V1010 (Human Species) or ANTH V1007 (Origins of Human Society) or the equivalent

Seminar focusing on recent advances in the study of human evolution. Topics include changing views of human evolution with respect to early hominin behavior, morphology, culture and evolution. [Enrollment limited to 13, priority given to EBHS majors/concentrators.] [Taught every other year.]

EEEB W3215 Forensic Osteology. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement
Not Offered During 2014-15 Academic Year.

Prerequisites: No prior experience with skeletal anatomy required. Not appropriate for students who have already taken either G4147 or G4148.

An exploration of the hidden clues in your skeleton. Students learn the techniques of aging, sexing, assessing ancestry, and the effects of disease, trauma and culture on human bone. Enrollment limited to 15. Priority given at first class session to EBHS majors/concentrators. [Taught every other year.]