Sociology

http://sociology.barnard.edu/

332 Milbank Hall
212-854-3577
212-854-7491 (fax)
Department Assistant: Marsha Peruo

Mission

Sociology explores the intricacies of social life in all its variety: from the prosaic routines of everyday life to dramatic transformations of state and economy, from the symbolic realm of identity and culture to the structures of class, race and gender that generate inequality. Despite all this diversity, the discipline of sociology has a powerful coherence that comes from a collective dedication to developing theoretical principles about social life and testing them with empirical evidence. This commitment to systematic empirical research represents the strength of the discipline and the chance for a distinctive undergraduate experience for Sociology majors at Barnard.  It exposes them to a range of approaches that include quantitative data collection and analysis, participant observation, intensive interviewing, historical-archival research, and discourse analysis.

All students taking courses in Sociology at Barnard can expect to learn about the relevance of empirical rigor and theoretical analysis for public policy, political and social debate, and civic engagement more broadly defined.

Sociology majors will develop critical analytic and research skills that they can take with them into a wide range of careers, whether they continue on to graduate study in sociology or choose to enter such fields as business, education, law, nonprofit enterprise or public policy.

The Department provides students with expertise in three areas:

  1. a common foundation in the discipline’s core theories and methodologies through the following three required courses:
  2. exposure to a range of substantive questions that motivate sociological research through a 3-tiered elective structure:
    • 2000-level courses introduce non-majors and majors to substantive concerns through sociological texts and perspectives;
    • 3000-level courses are normally lecture courses that introduce upper level students (majors and non-majors) to dominant theoretical models and debates in more specialized subfields;
    • 3900-level courses are seminars that provide more intensive engagement with primary research in specialized subfields of the discipline and involve some significant primary or secondary research paper
  3. direct research experience both within the classroom and under faculty supervision in the Senior Thesis Seminar or designated senior research seminars.

Student Learning Outcomes

Students who graduate with a major in sociology will be able to:

  • Discuss the core theories of the discipline and apply them to contemporary issues.
  • Identify the central questions that motivate sociological research in at least one specialized subfield.
  • Describe and evaluate the strengths and limits of social science research.
  • Apply the methods of social science research to a question of substantive or theoretical importance.
  • Design, execute, and present original research projects.

Students who graduate with a minor in sociology will be able to:

  • Discuss the core theories of the discipline and apply them to contemporary issues.
  • Identify the central questions that motivate sociological research in at least one specialized subfield.
  • Describe and evaluate the strengths and limits of social science research.

Chair: Debra Minkoff (Miriam Scharfman Zadek Family Professor)
Professor: Jonathan Rieder
Associate Professor: Elizabeth Bernstein, Mignon Moore
Assistant Professors: Debbie Becher, Christel Kesler
Term Assistant Professor of Professional Practice: J.C. Salyer

Requirements for the Major

There are no special admissions requirements or procedures for students interested in majoring in sociology. Students are assigned a major adviser on declaring the major; prior to that, students are encouraged to consult with any member of the department regarding their choice and sequence of courses.

A minimum of 10 courses is required for the major, including:

The Sociology major is comprised of 10 courses. These include:

Foundations (3 courses):

SOCI UN1000 The Social World (recommended no later than the sophomore year)

SOCI UN3000 Social Theory

SOCI UN3010 Methods for Social Research (no later than the junior year)

Electives (5 courses):

Of the five electives required for the major, no more than one can be at the 2000 level and at least one must be a seminar at the 3900 (or 4000) level.

With the exception of the senior thesis or designated research seminar (see below) the Foundations and Elective courses may be taken at either Barnard or Columbia

Senior Requirement (2 courses):

There are two ways to satisfy the senior requirement.

Research Paper Option: two upper level seminars, including enrollment in (1) a designated research seminar (3900 level) in the Barnard Sociology Department that requires a 25- to 30-page paper, including some primary research; and (2) any additional upper level seminar (3900 or 4000 level).

Thesis Option: two-semester senior thesis, involving original sociological research and analysis on a topic of the student’s choice, in consultation with an advisor; requires enrollment in SOCI BC3087-3088.


Additional Information about the senior requirement

Research Paper Option: This option is intended for majors who are interested graduating with a broader exposure to the discipline of sociology, with more limited experience in conducting original research. Each semester the department offers 2-3 designated research seminars, which are listed on the department’s website prior to the Spring program planning period. These seminars vary in content and format and are open to all students, with priority given to senior sociology majors taking the course to meet their senior requirement.

Prerequisites for students taking the designated research seminar to meet the senior requirement include successful completion of: (1)SOCI UN1000 The Social World; (2) SOCI UN3000 Social Theory or SOCI UN3010 Methods for Social Research; and (3) at least one elective course related to the focus of the seminar.  Instructors may waive some aspect of the prerequisites.

Students may also enroll in these seminars prior to their senior year for elective credit.

Thesis Option: The two-semester senior thesis involves original sociological research and analysis on a topic of the student’s choice, in consultation with an advisor.  This option is intended for majors who want the opportunity to explore a sociological subfield in depth and conduct independent primary research as their senior capstone experience. Students interested in writing a senior thesis must submit a 2-3 paragraph proposal, along with a brief letter of endorsement from a faculty member in the department who has agreed to serve as their thesis advisor to the Department Chair, no later than the advanced program planning deadline for the student’s first semester of their senior year. Decisions will be made in consultation with the student’s program and thesis advisors prior to the final program planning deadline for that semester. In exceptional cases, students may apply for and receive permission to enroll in the two-semester option before the deadline for final program approval in the first semester of their senior year. 

Prerequisites:  (1) SOCI UN1000 The Social World; (2)SOCI UN3010 Methods for Social Research; and (3) at least one elective course related to the proposed thesis topic must be completed before the first semester of the senior year to be eligible for the two-semester thesis.   

Students approved for the senior thesis will enroll in SOCI BC3087 Individual Projects for Seniors and SOCI BC3088 Individual Projects for Seniors with their selected adviser.


Special note:  If a student taking a designated one-semester senior seminar in the first semester of their senior year would like to extend that work into a senior thesis in their final semester, they may petition for special permission to enroll in SOCI BC3088 Individual Projects for Seniors to do so, with approval of their program adviser and a faculty member willing to advise them. Petitions must be received one week prior to the advance program filing deadline of their final semester and will only be granted in rare circumstances.

All seniors must submit a final, bound copy of the research paper or senior thesis to the Department no later than the last day of classes of the second semester of their senior year in order to receive credit (Pass or Pass with Distinction) for the senior requirement.

Use this link to identify the major requirements that you have completed.


Requirements for the Minor

5 courses are required for the minor in Sociology, including SOCI UN1000 The Social World, SOCI UN3000 Social Theory and three elective courses (no more than one at the 2000-level), to be selected in consultation with the Sociology Department Chair.

SOCI UN1000 The Social World. 3 points.

Identification of the distinctive elements of sociological perspectives on society. Readings confront classical and contemporary approaches with key social issues that include power and authority, culture and communication, poverty and discrimination, social change, and popular uses of sociological concepts.

Fall 2017: SOCI UN1000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 1000 001/62456 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
417 International Affairs Bldg
Teresa Sharpe 3 251/250
Spring 2018: SOCI UN1000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 1000 001/14642 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Adam Reich 3 185/250

SOCI UN2208 Culture in America. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Corequisites: General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC).

The values and meanings that form American pluralism. The three sections explore taste, consumption, and art; moral conflict, religion and secularism; identity, community and ideology. Examples range widely: Individualism, liberalism and conservatism; Obama's "transracial" endeavor; the food revolution; struggles over family and sexuality; multiculturalism; assimilation and immigration.

Spring 2018: SOCI UN2208
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 2208 001/01114 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Ll104 Diana Center
Jonathan Rieder 3 52/69

SOCI UN3000 Social Theory. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

Required for all sociology majors.  Prerequisite: at least one sociology course of the instructor's permission.  Theoretical accounts of the rise and transformations of modern society in the19th and 20th centuries.  Theories studied include those of Adam Smith, Tocqueville, Marx, Durkheim, Max Weber, Roberto Michels.  Selected topics:  individual, society, and polity; economy, class, and status: organization and ideology; religion and society; moral and instrumental action.

Fall 2017: SOCI UN3000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3000 001/05710 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
504 Diana Center
Deborah Becher 3 50/68
Spring 2018: SOCI UN3000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3000 001/63594 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Shamus Khan 3 63

SOCI UN3010 Methods for Social Research. 4 points.

Prerequisites: SOCI UN1000 The Social World or Instructor Permission

Required for all Sociology majors.  Introductory course in social scientific research methods. Provides a general overview of the ways sociologists collect information about social phenomena, focusing on how to collect data that are reliable and applicable to our research questions.

Fall 2017: SOCI UN3010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3010 001/12110 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
5ab Kraft Center
Maria Abascal 4 54/70
Spring 2018: SOCI UN3010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3010 001/02425 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Marnie Brady 4 55/75

SOCI BC3087 Individual Projects for Seniors. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Meets senior requirement. Instructor permission required.

The instructor will supervise the writing of long papers involving some form of sociological research and analysis.

Fall 2017: SOCI BC3087
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3087 001/07768  
Deborah Becher 4 2
SOCI 3087 002/05344  
Elizabeth Bernstein 4 1
SOCI 3087 004/06814  
Debra Minkoff 4 5
SOCI 3087 005/02034  
Mignon Moore 4 0
SOCI 3087 006/04740  
Jonathan Rieder 4 2

SOCI BC3088 Individual Projects for Seniors. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Meets senior requirement. Instructor permission required.

The instructor will supervise the writing of long papers involving some form of sociological research and analysis.

Spring 2018: SOCI BC3088
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3088 001/05961  
Deborah Becher 4 1
SOCI 3088 002/05012  
Elizabeth Bernstein 4 1
SOCI 3088 003/09398  
Debra Minkoff 4 3
SOCI 3088 005/03319  
Mignon Moore 4 0
SOCI 3088 006/03603  
Jonathan Rieder 4 2

SOCI W3207 Music, Race, and Identity. 3 points.

Music, Race and Identity explores the complex relationships among race, art, organization, economics, social movements, and identity. The three sections of the course each examines a major stage in American race relations: slavery and segregation, the period leading up to and through the civil rights revolution, and the post-civil rights era. Emphasis is on the shifting conceptions of identity and the changing role of race and racism in the spirituals, gospel music, minstrelsy, rhythm and blues, rock ‘n’ roll, crossover soul, Hip Hop, and contemporary popular music. As we make our way toward the current moment, two related questions will loom large in the light of the historical terrain we have traversed:  to what extent do issues of economic and social inequality more than membership in racial communities increasingly determine identity and taste? And to what extent can we say that we are moving toward a “postethnic” sensibility in the musical realm, in which displays of ethnic identity coexist with  trading places, the severing of racial ownership from aesthetic genre, and the blurring of racial boundaries.  

SOCI BC3214 Sociology of African American Life. 3 points.

Emphasizes foundations and development of black communities post-1940, and mechanisms in society that create and maintain racial inequality. Explores notions of identity and culture through lenses of gender, class and sexual orientation, and ideologies that form the foundation of black politics. Primarily lecture and some discussion.

SOCI BC3217 Race, Ethnicity, and Society. 3 points.

This course examines the social construction of "race" and ethnicity and how their effects have aligned with intersecting social logics to produce injustice. Emphasis is on understanding U.S. logics of race and ethnicity in comparative perspective and in placing contemporary racial and ethnic politics in historical perspective.

SOCI UN3225 Sociology of Education. 3 points.

All of us have spent many years in school and understand that schools impact our lives in important ways. But how exactly does formal schooling shape young people? And how do students make sense of their lives in the context of schools and educational systems more broadly? In this class we will examine education as a central institution in modern society, and we will grapple with an important question: What role does education play in reinforcing or challenging broader patterns of social inequality and mobility?   Particular emphasis will be placed on higher education as a critical site in which these processes take shape.

Spring 2018: SOCI UN3225
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3225 001/07492 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
Room TBA
0. FACULTY 3 39

SOCI UN3235 Social Movements: Collective Action. 3 points.

Prerequisites: One introductory course in Sociology suggested.

Social movements and the theories social scientists use to explain them, with emphasis on the American civil rights and women's movements.  Topics include theories of participation, the personal and social consequences of social movements, the rationality of protest, the influence of ideology, organization, and the state on movement success, social movements, and the mass media.

Fall 2017: SOCI UN3235
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3235 001/01592 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
324 Milbank Hall
Marnie Brady 3 20

SOCI UN3285 Israeli Society and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. 3 points.

The purpose of the course is to acquaint students with Israeli society through the lens of the Israeli- Palestinian conflict. The underlying assumption in this course is that much of the social, economic, political, and cultural processes in contemporary Israel have been shaped by the 100-year Israeli- Arab/Palestinian conflict.

Fall 2017: SOCI UN3285
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3285 001/66822 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
101 Knox Hall
Yinon Cohen 3 10/50

SOCI UN3302 Sociology of Gender. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Prerequisites: One introductory course in Sociology suggested.

Examination of factors in gender identity that are both universal (across time, culture, setting) and specific to a social context. Social construction of gender roles in different settings, including family, work, and politics. Attention to the role of social policies in reinforcing norms or facilitating change.

Fall 2017: SOCI UN3302
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3302 001/05599 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
409 Barnard Hall
Marnie Brady 3 26/35

SOCI UN3324 Global Urbanism. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

  Using classical texts about cities (do they still work for us?) and on the diverse new literatures on cities and larger sujects with direct urban implications, we ill use a variety of data sets to get a detailed empirical information, and draw on two large ongoing research projects involving major and minor global cities around the world (a total of over 60 cities are covered in detail as of 2008).

Fall 2017: SOCI UN3324
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3324 001/61591 M W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
417 International Affairs Bldg
Saskia Sassen 3 333/399

SOCI UN3900 Societal Adaptations to Terrorism. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing

Examines how countries have adjusted to the threat of terrorism. How the adaptation reflects the pattern of terrorist attacks, as well as structural and cultural features of the society. Adaptations by individuals, families, and organizational actors.

Fall 2017: SOCI UN3900
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3900 001/72799 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
509 Knox Hall
Seymour Spilerman 4 24/24

SOCI UN3901 The Sociology of Culture. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

Prerequisites: SOCI BC1003 or equivalent social science course and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15 students.

Drawing examples from popular music, religion, politics, race, and gender, explores the interpretation, production, and reception of cultural texts and meanings. Topics include aesthetic distinction and taste communities, ideology, power, and resistance; the structure and functions of subcultures; popular culture and high culture; and ethnography and interpretation.

Fall 2017: SOCI UN3901
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3901 001/03482 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
502 Diana Center
Jonathan Rieder 4 16
Spring 2018: SOCI UN3901
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3901 001/03901 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Jonathan Rieder 4 27

SOCI BC3907 Communities and Social Change. 4 points.

Examines how changes in the economy, racial composition, and class relations affect community life-how it is created, changed and sometimes lost-with a specific focus on the local urban context. Student research projects will address how contemporary forces such as neoliberalization, gentrification and tourism impact a community's social fabric.

Spring 2018: SOCI BC3907
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3907 001/03993 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Marnie Brady 4 48

SOCI BC3911 The Social Contexts of U.S. Immigration Law and Policy. 4 points.

Examines the historical and contemporary social, economic, and political factors that shape immigration law and policy along with the social consequences of those laws and policies.  Addresses the development and function of immigration law and aspects of the immigration debate including unauthorized immigration, anti-immigration sentiments, and critiques of immigration policy.

SOCI BC3913 Inequalities: Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in U.S. Law and Society. 4 points.

This class will examine the historical roots and ongoing persistence of social, economic, and political inequality and the continuing role that it plays in U.S. society by examining how such issues have been addressed both in social science and in law.

SOCI BC3919 Transitions to Adulthood. 3 points.

Prerequisites: SOCI W 1000 and SOCI W3010 or permission of instructor. Meets senior requirement.

Adolescence and early adulthood is a critical period in our lives. This research-intensive seminar explores how adolescent transitions are studied, how they compare across different national contexts, and how individual, family, and community factors affect the type and timing of different transitions.

SOCI BC3920 Advanced Topics in Gender and Sexuality. 4 points.

This research and writing-intensive seminar is designed for senior majors with a background and interest in the sociology of gender and sexuality. The goal of the seminar is to facilitate completion of the senior requirement (a 25-30 page paper) based on “hands on” research with original qualitative data. Since the seminar will be restricted to students with prior academic training in the subfield, students will be able to receive intensive research training and guidance through every step of the research process, from choosing a research question to conducting original ethnographic and interview-based research, to analyzing and interpreting one’s findings. The final goal of the course will be the production of an original paper of standard journal-article length. Students who choose to pursue their projects over the course of a  second semester will have the option of revisiting their articles further for submission and publications.

SOCI BC3925 Advanced Topics in Law & Society. 4 points.

Law creates order. And yet, outlaws or lawbreakers are everywhere. Students will learn to ask and answer questions about living law, understanding that it involves law-followers and law-breakers. Students will read and discuss sociological investigations of the law and perform their own research into a significant question about law-in-action.

SOCI BC3927 Advanced Topics in Immigration and Inequality. 4 points.

Examines processes of immigrant incorporation in the U.S. and other advanced democracies, with a focus on how immigration intersects with categorical inequalities (such as citizenship, social class, race, ethnicity, gender, and religion) in major institutional realms. Under instructor's supervision, students conduct a substantial research project related to course themes.

SOCI BC3930 Advanced Topics: Race and Ethnicity. 4 points.

Discusses theories of race and ethnicity, distinctions between prejudice, discrimination, and racism, and the intersectionality paradigm. Under instructor’s guidance students design a research proposal, conduct their own fieldwork and write a research paper on a sociological question relating to race and/or ethnicity.

Spring 2018: SOCI BC3930
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3930 001/01311 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Mignon Moore 4 23

SOCI BC3931 Seminar for Internships in Social Justice and Human Rights. 3 points.

Corequisites: Students must have an internship related to social justice or human rights during

This class is intended to complement and enhance the internship experience for students working in internships that relate to social justice and human rights during the Spring 2016 semester. This course will meet bi-weekly to provide an academic framing of the issues that students are working on and to provide an opportunity for students to analyze their internship experience.

SOCI BC3932 Climate Change, Global Migration, and Human Rights in the Anthropocene. 3 points.

While the existence of processes of anthropogenic climate change is well established, predictions regarding the future consequences of these processes are far less certain. In no area is the uncertainty regarding near and long term effects as pronounced as in the question of how climate change will affect global migration. This course will address the issue of climate migration in four ways.  First, the course will examine the theoretical and empirical literatures that have elucidated the nature of international migration in general.  Second, the course will consider the phenomena of anthropogenic climate change as it relates to migration.  Third, the course will consider how human rights and other legal regimes do or do not address the humanitarian issues created by anthropogenic climate change.  Fourth, the course will synthesize these topics by considering how migration and climate change has arisen as a humanitarian, political, and economic issue in the Pacific.  Human Rights elective.  

SOCI BC3933 Sociology of the Body. 4 points.

This seminar examines the ways in which the body is discursively constituted, and itself serves as the substratum for social life. Key questions include: How are distinctions made between "normal" and "pathological" bodies, and between the "psychic" and "somatic" realms? How do historical forces shape bodily experience? How do bodies that are racialized, gendered, and classed offer resistance to social categorization?

Spring 2018: SOCI BC3933
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3933 001/03303 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Elizabeth Bernstein 4 48

SOCI BC3934 Global Activism. 4 points.

This seminar explores social movements and political protest on the global stage. We will bring together the literatures on social movements and the sociology of globalization and transnationalism to explore the emergence, development, dynamics and consequences of global activism.

SOCI BC3935 Gender and Organizations. 4 points.

This course examines the sociological features of organizations through a gender lens. We will analyze how gender, race, class, and sexuality matter for individuals and groups within a variety of organizational contexts. The course is grounded in the sociological literatures on gender and organizations.

Spring 2018: SOCI BC3935
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3935 001/08844 T Th 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Heather Hurwitz 4 9

Cross-Listed Courses

Urban Studies

URBS V3308 Introduction to Urban Ethnographies. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Students must attend first class.

This course explores how scholars from different social science disciplines have used ethnography to understand how immigrants and rural migrants experience as well as affect cities. Community, work, and health, in cities within and outside the US, are used as lenses. Students will also perform their own ethnographic research.

URBS V3420 Introduction to Urban Sociology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Students must attend first class.

Examines the diverse ways in which sociology has defined and studied cities, focusing on the people who live and work in the city, and the transformations U.S. cities are undergoing today. Sociological methods, including ethnography, survey research, quantitative studies, and participant observation will provide perspectives on key urban questions such as street life, race, immigration, globalization, conflict, and redevelopment.

URBS UN3546 Junior Colloquium: Contemporary Urban Issues. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Non-majors admitted by permission of instructor. Students must attend first class. Enrollment limited to 16 students per section.

Evaluation of current political, economic, social, cultural and physical forces that are shaping urban areas.

Fall 2017: URBS UN3546
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
URBS 3546 001/09945 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
304 Hamilton Hall
Kathryn Yatrakis 4 14/16

URBS V3830 Eminent Domain and Neighborhood Change. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Intro to Urban Sociology or equivalent or permission of the instructor. Students must attend first class for instructor permission.

An examination of how the politics of eminent domain, as a government strategy for neighborhood change, plays out in the courts, city councils, administrative agencies, media, and the street. Readings drawn from law, history, planning, politics, economics, sociology, and primary sources. Emphasis on the U.S., with some international comparisons. This course will count toward Requirement A of the Urban Studies curriculum as a Sociology course.