Biology

Biology Department Office:
1203 Altschul Hall
212.854.2437 (phone)
212.280.2011 (fax)

Introductory Laboratory Office:
911 Altschul Hall 
212.854.1402

biology.barnard.edu
Department Administrator: Melissa Flores 

The Department of Biology

Biology explores the structure, function, and evolution of diverse living systems. It addresses some of the most important issues of our time—genetic engineering, stem cell research, obesity, cancer, and the effects of global warming. Majoring in Biology prepares students to pursue a career in research, teaching, or the allied health sciences. It is also relevant to careers as diverse as environmental policy, law, public health, creative writing, and textbook development.

Mission

The mission of the Biology major is to provide students with a broad education in biology. To this end, students are offered a range of lecture courses that span the molecular, physiological, and ecological levels of organization. Students also complete laboratory courses that help them learn how to design and test hypotheses, use modern scientific equipment, and interpret data. Finally, students learn scientific communication skills by critiquing research articles, writing laboratory reports and research papers, and participating in oral presentations and debates. The department encourages students to become involved in a research project under the guidance of a faculty member at Barnard or elsewhere in New York City.

Student Learning Outcomes

Students graduating with a major in Biology should be able to attain the following outcomes:

  • Demonstrate an appreciation of the many different life forms on planet Earth.
  • Have the ability to discuss a biological phenomenon from many different levels of organization (e.g., discuss HIV from the perspective of structure to host immune response to evolutionary and epidemiological issues).
  • Describe the basic features of Mendelian genetics and the central dogma of molecular biology; understand the basic physiological processes of at least one organism; and demonstrate an understanding of population-level processes.
  • Make an oral presentation on either an original research project or a published primary research paper.
  • Generate a testable hypothesis and develop and execute a controlled experimental design.
  • Write an original scientific paper and/or a review article.

Research

Students are strongly encouraged to engage in research at Barnard. Either or both year-long courses, BIOL BC3591 Guided Research and Seminar-BIOL BC3592 Guided Research and Seminar or BIOL BC3593 Senior Thesis Research-BIOL BC3594 Senior Thesis Research, may be used to fulfill major requirements while the variable-credit semester-long course, BIOL BC3597 Guided Research, may be used for degree credit.

In addition to conducting research during the academic year, students are encouraged to pursue summer research internships. Barnard faculty engage many students in paid research projects during the summer through the Summer Research Institute (SRI) at Barnard. The departmental office also has information about summer internships outside of Barnard. In addition, the department awards funds on a competitive basis to support summer research not otherwise funded by internships.

Introductory Course Selection

The Biology Department offers several options at the introductory level; students should select courses on the basis of their preparation and background in biology.

Students who took advanced biology in high school should enroll in the 1500-level sequence. This sequence can be started either in the fall (BIOL BC1500 Introduction to Organismal and Evolutionary Biology & BIOL BC1501 Introductory Lab in Organismal and Evolutionary Biology) or the spring (BIOL BC1502 Introduction to Cell and Molecular BiologyBIOL BC1503 Introductory Lab in Cell and Molecular Biology) and fulfills the science lecture and laboratory portion of the General Education Requirements, as well as the premedical requirement in biology. Please note that the Foundations distributional requirements for the sciences includes two science lecture courses, one of which must include a laboratory, but both of which do not necessarily need to be taken from the same scientific discipline. 

Students with little or no experience in biology should enroll in the 1000-level sequence, which provides an appropriate introduction to important concepts in the field. Offered in the fall, BIOL BC1002 Global Health and Ecology includes a laboratory component, while BIOL BC1001 Revolutionary Concepts in Biology, offered in the spring, consists only of a lecture component. Taken together, these two lectures and laboratory fulfill the science General Education Requirement. 

Students who wish to move on to the 1500-level courses are eligible to do so upon completion of BIOL BC1002 Global Health and Ecology with lab in the fall. Students must complete the entire 1500-level sequence (BIOL BC1500 Introduction to Organismal and Evolutionary BiologyBIOL BC1501 Introductory Lab in Organismal and Evolutionary BiologyBIOL BC1502 Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology, and BIOL BC1503 Introductory Lab in Cell and Molecular Biology) for the Biology major or minor and for the biology premedical requirements.

AP Course Credit

Students who have passed the Advanced Placement examination in biology with a grade of 4 or 5 receive 3 points of credit toward their degree. However, AP credit neither goes toward fulfillment of the science GER nor does it exempt a student from any introductory course.

AP degree credit is granted regardless of which introductory courses are completed at Barnard.

Chairs: Jennifer Mansfield (Associate Professor, Chair) and Brian Morton (Professor, Associate Chair)
Professor Emeritus: Philip Ammirato
Professors: Hilary Callahan, John Glendinning, Paul Hertz, and Brian Morton
Associate Professors: Elizabeth Bauer and Jennifer Mansfield
Assistant Professors: JJ Miranda, Alison Pischedda, and Jonathan Snow
Senior Lecturer: Jessica Goldstein
Adjunct Assistant Professors: Lisa Dailey and Diana Heller
Term Assistant Professor: Stephen Sturley
Introductory Lab Associates and Staff: James Casey, Colin Flanagan, Wanda Knauss, Nick Starapoli, & Henry Truong

Requirements for the Major

There are four ways to complete a major in Biology. A student can obtain a general Biology Major or may complete one of the three majors that concentrate on a specific level of biological organization: Cellular and Molecular; Physiology and Organismal; or Ecology and Evolutionary.
Introductory Biology
You may begin the introductory sequence with BIOL BC1002 Global Health and Ecology and the co-requisite lab BIOL BC1012 in the fall of your freshman year, but for the major you must then complete the entire 1500-level sequence the subsequent spring and fall.
BIOL BC1500Introduction to Organismal and Evolutionary Biology3
BIOL BC1501Introductory Lab in Organismal and Evolutionary Biology2
BIOL BC1502Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology3
BIOL BC1503Introductory Lab in Cell and Molecular Biology2
Genetics
BIOL BC2100Molecular and Mendelian Genetics3
It is recommended, but not required, that this be taken immediately following the completion of the 1500-level courses.
Five Upper Level Lecture Courses
All Biology majors must complete five upper-level courses, with category distribution requirements and the courses that fulfill each category listed below. To complete the Biology Major without a concentration, the five courses must include at least one course from each of the three categories. To complete one of the three concentrations, at least four courses must be from the appropriate category and at least one must be from another category. Although some courses are listed in multiple categories, a student can only use a course towards one of the categories. Additional Columbia courses that can be used to fulfill the major requirements are provided on the Biology website. If a student completes courses that make her eligible for more than one of the four majors, she may select which one is reflected on her transcript.
1. Cellular & Molecular Biology
BIOL BC2278Evolution3
BIOL BC3308Genomics and Bioinformatics3
BIOL BC3310Cell Biology3
BIOL BC3320Microbiology3
BIOL BC3352Development3
BIOL BC3362Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience3
CHEM BC3282Biological Chemistry3
BIOL UN3034Biotechnology3
BIOL UN3073Cellular and Molecular Immunology3
BIOL UN3310Virology3
2. Physiology & Organismal Biology
BIOL BC2262Vertebrate Biology3
BIOL BC2280Animal Behavior3
BIOL BC2286Statistics and Research Design3
BIOL BC3320Microbiology3
BIOL BC3360Physiology3
BIOL UN3005Neurobiology II: Development & Systems4
EEEB UN3011Behavioral Biology of the Living Primates3
EEEB UN3208Explorations in Primate Anatomy3
EEEB W4112Ichthyology3
3. Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
BIOL BC2240Plant Evolution and Diversity3
BIOL BC2262Vertebrate Biology3
BIOL BC2272Ecology3
BIOL BC2278Evolution3
BIOL BC2280Animal Behavior3
BIOL BC2286Statistics and Research Design3
BIOL BC2851Plants and Profits: The Global Power of Botany4
BIOL BC3380Applied Ecology and Evolution3
EEEB UN3087Conservation Biology3
EEEB W4110Coastal and Estuarine Ecology4
Three Upper Level Laboratory Courses
Students must complete at least three Biology laboratories beyond the 1500 level. Laboratories may require a lecture course as a co-requisite or prerequisite; such requirements are specified in the Barnard catalogue. A year-long research-seminar course (BIOL BC3591 followed by BIOL BC3592) may substitute for lab courses. Students may also take lab courses at Columbia (or other institutions) to satisfy the lab requirement, with permission from the Associate Chair.
Research Option
A student may count two consecutive semesters of Guided Research and Seminar (BIOL BC3591 followed by BIOL BC3592) as a laboratory course for the major. Guided Research (BIOL BC3597) counts for degree credit but does not count toward the major. A student may not receive credit for research that is paid.
Senior Capstone Experience
Students must enroll in one section of Senior Seminar (BIOL BC3590) or complete two semesters of Senior Thesis Research Seminar (BIOL BC3593 followed by BIOL BC3594). A student cannot take both Senior Thesis Research and Guided Research and Seminar at the same time.
Chemistry Requirement
One semester of General Chemistry (with laboratory) and one semester of Organic Chemistry (with laboratory) are required.

Requirement for the Minor

A minor in biology includes:

BIOL BC1500Introduction to Organismal and Evolutionary Biology3
BIOL BC1501Introductory Lab in Organismal and Evolutionary Biology2
BIOL BC1502Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology3
BIOL BC1503Introductory Lab in Cell and Molecular Biology2
Three additional lecture courses at the 2100 level or higher
Two additional laboratory courses *,**

BIOL BC1001 Revolutionary Concepts in Biology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Course does not fulfill Biology major requirements or premedical requirements.

Exploration of the major discoveries and ideas that have revolutionized the way we view organisms and understand life. The basic concepts of cell biology, anatomy and physiology, genetics, evolution, and ecology will be traced from seminal discoveries to the modern era. The laboratory will develop these concepts and analyze biological diversity through a combined experimental and observational approach.

BIOL BC1002 Global Health and Ecology. 4.5 points.

Prerequisites: Course does not fulfill biology major requirements or premedical requirements. BIOL BC1001 or AP/IB credit are prerequisites for students fulfilling a Nine Ways of Knowing requirement. Students fulfilling a Foundations requirement, may take BC1002 as a one-semester course, with no prerequisites.

What disease is the number one killer worldwide? What will be the next pandemic? Fundamentals of human physiology and microbiology are explored in the context of major global health issues. Principles of ecology are outlined, with an emphasis on the bidrectional impact of the interactions of humans with the global environment. Lab exercises introduce biological techniques for studying these topics.Lab is required. Enrollment is limited to 16 students per section.

BIOL BC1011 BIOL BC1001 Lab. 0 points.

Prerequisites: Course does not fulfill Biology major requirements or premedical requirements. Enrollment in laboratory limited to 16 students per section.

Exploration of the major discoveries and ideas that have revolutionized the way we view organisms and understand life. The basic concepts of cell biology, anatomy and physiology, genetics, evolution, and ecology will be traced from seminal discoveries to the modern era. The laboratory will develop these concepts and analyze biological diversity through a combined experimental and observational approach.

BIOL BC1012 BIOL BC1002 Lab. 0 points.

MUST ATTEND FIRST LAB TO HOLD PLACE

Prerequisites: Course does not fulfill biology major requirements or premedical requirements. BIOL BC1001 or equivalent preparation and background. Enrollment in laboratory sections limited to 16 students per section.

Exploration of modern biology as it pertains to contemporary issues. One module examines the microbiological agents that cause disease and addresses how such agents can be used as weapons for terrorism or war. Another module considers human physiology, focusing on major health issues. The third module explores growth and resource use, emphasizing the uniqueness of human populations. Lab exercises introduce biological techniques for studying these topics.

BIOL BC1500 Introduction to Organismal and Evolutionary Biology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1002 or equivalent preparation. Course suitable for fulfillment of premedical requirements.

Detailed introduction to biological phenomena above the cellular level; development, anatomy, and physiology of plants and animals; physiological, population, behavioral, and community ecology; evolutionary theory; analysis of micro-evolutionary events; and systematics.

Fall 2018: BIOL BC1500
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 1500 001/06536 M W F 9:00am - 9:50am
304 Barnard Hall
Paul Hertz, James Casey 3 219/245

BIOL BC1501 Introductory Lab in Organismal and Evolutionary Biology. 2 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1002 or equivalent preparation. Enrollment limited to 16 students per section. Course suitable for fulfillment of premedical requirements. BIOL BC1500 as prerequisite or corequisite.

A laboratory-based introduction to the major groups of living organisms; anatomy, physiology, evolution, and systematics; and laboratory techniques for studying and comparing functional adaptations.

Fall 2018: BIOL BC1501
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 1501 001/02041 M 1:10pm - 4:00pm
912 Altschul Hall
James Casey 2 15/16
BIOL 1501 002/08043 M 1:10pm - 4:00pm
913 Altschul Hall
James Casey 2 14/16
BIOL 1501 003/01382 T 9:00am - 11:50am
912 Altschul Hall
James Casey 2 14/16
BIOL 1501 004/09301 T 9:00am - 11:50am
913 Altschul Hall
James Casey 2 14/16
BIOL 1501 005/06319 T 1:10pm - 4:00pm
912 Altschul Hall
James Casey 2 14/16
BIOL 1501 006/07840 T 1:10pm - 4:00pm
913 Altschul Hall
James Casey 2 14/16
BIOL 1501 007/05293 W 10:00am - 12:50pm
912 Altschul Hall
James Casey 2 11/16
BIOL 1501 008/03619 W 10:00am - 12:50pm
913 Altschul Hall
James Casey 2 12/16
BIOL 1501 010/08372 W 2:10pm - 5:00pm
913 Altschul Hall
James Casey 2 13/16
BIOL 1501 011/02731 Th 1:10pm - 4:00pm
912 Altschul Hall
James Casey 2 17/16
BIOL 1501 012/04681 F 10:00am - 12:50pm
912 Altschul Hall
James Casey 2 15/16
BIOL 1501 013/01344 F 10:00am - 12:50pm
913 Altschul Hall
James Casey 2 13/16

BIOL BC1502 Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1002 or equivalent preparation. Course suitable for fulfillment of premedical requirements. Together with BIOL BC1500 this course is part of a yearlong introductory sequence. BIOL BC1500 and BIOL BC1502 do not need to be taken in sequence.

Detailed introduction to cellular and subcellular biology: cell structures and functions, energy metabolism, biogenesis of cell components, biology of inheritance, molecular genetics, regulation of gene expression, and genes in development.

Spring 2019: BIOL BC1502
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 1502 001/04239 M W F 9:00am - 9:50am
Room TBA
Jonathan Snow, James Casey 3 100/100

BIOL BC1503 Introductory Lab in Cell and Molecular Biology. 2 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1002 or equivalent preparation. BIOL BC1502 as co-requisite (preferred) or prerequisite. Enrollment limited to 16 students per section. Course suitable for fulfillment of premedical requirements.

A laboratory-based introduction to cell and molecular biology.  Both classic and modern approaches are used to investigate principles of heredity as well as the structure and function of cells and their molecular components.   Lab exercises introduce practical techniques and data analysis.

Spring 2019: BIOL BC1503
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 1503 001/04360 M 1:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Jessica Goldstein, James Casey 2 0/16
BIOL 1503 002/04383 M 1:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Jessica Goldstein, James Casey 2 0/16
BIOL 1503 003/03136 T 9:00am - 11:50am
Room TBA
Jessica Goldstein, James Casey 2 0/16
BIOL 1503 004/08773 T 9:00am - 11:50am
Room TBA
Jessica Goldstein, James Casey 2 0/16
BIOL 1503 005/04291 T 1:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Jessica Goldstein, James Casey 2 0/16
BIOL 1503 006/09442 T 1:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Jessica Goldstein, James Casey 2 0/16
BIOL 1503 007/06044 W 10:00am - 12:50pm
Room TBA
Jessica Goldstein, James Casey 2 0/16
BIOL 1503 008/08339 W 10:00am - 12:50pm
Room TBA
Jessica Goldstein, James Casey 2 0/16
BIOL 1503 009/01151 Th 1:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Jessica Goldstein, James Casey 2 0/16
BIOL 1503 010/01443 W 2:10pm - 5:00pm
Room TBA
Jessica Goldstein, James Casey 2 0/16
BIOL 1503 011/08816 Th 1:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Jessica Goldstein, James Casey 2 0/16
BIOL 1503 012/09321 F 10:00am - 12:50pm
Room TBA
Jessica Goldstein, James Casey 2 0/16
BIOL 1503 013/04585 F 10:00am - 12:50pm
Room TBA
Jessica Goldstein, James Casey 2 0/16

BIOL BC1511 BIOL BC1501 Recitation. 0 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1001 or equivalent preparation. Enrollment limited to 16 students per section. Course suitable for fulfillment of premedical requirements. BIOL BC1500 as prerequisite or corequisite.

A laboratory-based introduction to the major groups of living organisms; anatomy, physiology, evolution, and systematics; laboratory techniques for studying and comparing functional adaptations.

Fall 2018: BIOL BC1511
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 1511 001/04287 M 10:00am - 10:50am
304 Barnard Hall
Jessica Goldstein 0 76
BIOL 1511 002/07333 F 1:00pm - 1:50pm
304 Barnard Hall
Jessica Goldstein 0 92

BIOL BC1513 BIOL BC1503 Recitation. 0 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1001 or equivalent preparation. BIOL BC1502 as corequisite (preferred) or prerequisite. Course suitable for fulfillment of premedical requirements.

Recitation section for BIOL BC1503, which is a laboratory-based introduction to cell and molecular biology. Both classic and modern approaches are used to investigate principles of heredity as well as the structure and function of cells and their molecular components. Lab exercises introduce practical techniques and data analysis.

Spring 2019: BIOL BC1513
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 1513 001/07755 M 10:00am - 10:50am
Room TBA
Jessica Goldstein 0 17
BIOL 1513 002/00338 F 1:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Jessica Goldstein 0 11

BIOL BC1599 Science Journal Club. 1 point.

Prerequisites: ) Limited to 16 students who are participating in the Science Pathways Scholars Program.

Students in this seminar course will be introduced to the scientific literature by reading a mix of classic papers and papers that describe significant new developments in the field. Seminar periods will be devoted to oral reports, discussion of assigned reading, and student responses.

,

Section 1: Limited to students in the Science Pathways Scholars Program. 
,Section 2: Limited to first-year students who received a 4 or 5 on the AP and are currently enrolled in BIOL BC1500.

Fall 2018: BIOL BC1599
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 1599 001/06393 W 12:00pm - 1:00pm
308 Diana Center
Paul Hertz 1 10/16
Spring 2019: BIOL BC1599
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 1599 001/05623 T 1:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Sedelia Rodriguez 1 0
BIOL 1599 002/01152 T 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room TBA
Paul Hertz 1 1

BIOL BC2100 Molecular and Mendelian Genetics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501, BIOL BC1502, BIOL BC1503 or the equivalent.

Mendelian and molecular genetics of both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, with an emphasis on human genetics. Topics include segregation, recombination and linkage maps, cytogenetics, gene structure and function, mutation, molecular aspects of gene expression and regulation, genetic components of cancer, and genome studies.

Fall 2018: BIOL BC2100
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 2100 001/07322 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
504 Diana Center
Brian Morton 3 58/70
Spring 2019: BIOL BC2100
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 2100 001/03925 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Jennifer Mansfield 3 26

BIOL BC2240 Plant Evolution and Diversity. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501, BIOL BC1502, BIOL BC1503 or the equivalent.

Survey of plant biology emphasizing evolutionary and ecological perspectives on mating and reproduction, physiology, anatomy and morphology.

BIOL BC2262 Vertebrate Biology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501, BIOL BC1502, BIOL BC1503 or equivalent.

Systematic survey of the Phylum Chordata: fossil history, biogeography, systematics, natural history, body architecture, energetics, locomotion, feeding, and behavior.

Spring 2019: BIOL BC2262
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 2262 001/01153 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Paul Hertz 3 11

BIOL BC2272 Ecology. 3 points.

Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501, BIOL BC1502, BIOL BC1503 or the equivalent.

Introduction to evolutionary ecology; life history strategies, population growth, competition, predator-prey interactions, population regulation, species diversity, community organization, biogeography. Lectures integrate theory with empirical studies.

BIOL BC2278 Evolution. 3 points.

Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501, BIOL BC1502, BIOL BC1503 or equivalent.

Study of the process of evolution with an emphasis on the mechanisms underlying evolutionary change. Topics include the origins of life, rates of evolutionary change, phylogenetics, molecular evolution, adaptive significance of traits, sexual selection, and human evolution.

BIOL BC2280 Animal Behavior. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501, BIOL BC1502, BIOL BC1503 or equivalent.

Introduction to animal behavior; physiological bases of behavior (sensory systems, neurophysiology of behavior, appetitive and reproductive behavior), ethological approaches to behavior (communication, territoriality, dominance, and aggression) and evolution of behavior (behavior genetics, behavioral ecology, sociobiology).

Spring 2019: BIOL BC2280
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 2280 001/09388 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Alison Pischedda 3 63

BIOL BC2281 Laboratory in Animal Behavior. 3 points.

standard for lab courses in Biology

Prerequisites: (BIOL BC1500) and (BIOL BC1502) and (BIOL BC2280) and (BIOL BC1501) and (BIOL BC1503)

This lab provides an introduction to animal behavior research, including current research approaches and practical applications of these findings. Students will complete two main projects. The first is a group project using the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, which will involve observing, recording, and analyzing reproductive behaviors. The second is an independent project that will be designed, conducted, and analyzed by students using publicly available animal behavior resources and/or data. Both projects will incorporate critical thinking, problem solving and experimental design, with an emphasize on scientific writing and oral presentation skills. 

Fall 2018: BIOL BC2281
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 2281 001/01224 W 1:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Alison Pischedda 3 8/16

BIOL BC2286 Statistics and Research Design. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501, BIOL BC1502, BIOL BC1503 or the equivalent, college-level algebra or the equivalent. General Educational Requirement: Quantitative and Deductive Reasoning (QUA)

Introduction to basic principles of statistics and experimental design. Topics include common statistical procedure, analysis of data, sampling populations, power analysis, and the design of experiments. This course differs from traditional statistics courses by explicitly integrating statistics into research process.

BIOL BC2574 Laboratory in Human Anatomy. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Ongoing dance (or other movement) practice is a co-requisite; or permission from the instructor.
Corequisites: DNCE BC2573

This new interdisciplinary laboratory course will introduce students to the practices of creative and scientific research in anatomy. The laboratory course will offer students “hands-on” opportunities to view cadaveric specimens, to collect, analyze and communicate scientific information/data related to anatomy and to explore the use of anatomical information to generate creative movement and choreography.

BIOL BC2801 Laboratory in Genetics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501, BIOL BC1502, BIOL BC1503; and pre or corequisite, BIOL BC2100 and Enrollment limited to 16 students per section.

Exercises in genetics at both the Mendelian and molecular levels. Basic principles of genetic analysis will be studied using Drosophila and bacteria. A project in molecular genetics, involving such techniques as PCR, gel electrophoresis, and cloning, will be undertaken using plant genes.

Fall 2018: BIOL BC2801
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 2801 001/06352 Th 1:10pm - 6:00pm
1214 Altschul Hall
Lisa Dailey 3 15/18

BIOL BC2841 Laboratory in Plant Evolution and Diversity. 3 points.

Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501, BIOL BC1502, BIOL BC1503. Enrollment limited to 16.

Studies of the structure, ecology, and evolution of plants. Laboratory exercises include field problems, laboratory experiments, plant collections and identification, and examination of the morphology of plant groups.

BIOL BC2851 Plants and Profits: The Global Power of Botany. 4 points.

The course is part of the Barnard Teaches program. It will have a lab that will teach science and digital skills and on Thursdays two consecutive times are scheduled to allow lecture and lab to accommodate trips to NYBG.

Prerequisites: Strongly recommend prior enrollment in BIOL BC1001 or 1002, or in BIOL BC 1501 and 1502, or the equivalent. Students need to understand genetics and must be prepared to read professional science literature. Science students must be prepared for lengthy reading assignments.

Sustaining complex human systems requires plants, which in turn depend on soils, geology, and climate. With that reality in the foreground, this course will foster fluency and expertise in classical and cutting edge botanical science: genetics, genomics, biogeography, conservation biology, economic and ethno-botany. At the center of its investigations will be the ongoing digital revolution, recognizing that natural history has been and will continue to be essential to all of the plant sciences. The course will encourage interdisciplinary perspectives, pushing students outside of their intellectual comfort zones and aiming to comprehend plant biodiversity from a multiplicity of human perspectives.

Spring 2019: BIOL BC2851
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 2851 001/02742 F 12:00pm - 3:30pm
Room TBA
Hilary Callahan 4 5/16
BIOL 2851 001/02742 W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Hilary Callahan 4 5/16

BIOL BC2873 Laboratory in Ecology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC2272 (or corequisite). Enrollment limited to 16.

The definition of ecological problems in experimentally tractable ways; the design of experiments and analysis of ecological data; class projects on population ecology. Students conduct individual projects during last month of term.

Spring 2019: BIOL BC2873
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 2873 001/01154 W 1:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
0. FACULTY, Paul Hertz 3 0/16

BIOL BC2900 Research Methods Seminar. 1 point.

Instructor's Permission RequiredNot offered during 2018-19 academic year.

Skills to facilitate entry into biology and chemistry research. Students will learn to think and work like scientists and to identify, apply for and gain entry to research lab groups.  Focus on writing and oral presentation skills. Additional readings and discussions on laboratory safety, women in science, and scientific ethics. 

,

Prerequisites:  Students must be sophomores with a strong interest in pursuing research in the biological or chemical sciences.

BIOL BC3303 Laboratory in Molecular Biology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC2100 (which can be taken as a corequisite) or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 16.

Introduction to the use of molecular techniques to answer questions about subcellular biological phenomena. Techniques include isolation of genomic and plasmid DNAs, restriction enzyme analysis, DNA and protein electrophoresis, bacterial transformation, and plasmid subcloning.

Spring 2019: BIOL BC3303
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3303 001/09702 W 1:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Stephen Sturley 3 5/16

BIOL BC3305 Project Laboratory in Molecular Genetics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501, BIOL BC1502, BIOL BC1503, and BIOL BC2100 or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 16.

Laboratory course in which students conduct original research projects in molecular genetics. Students will participate in experimental design, conduct and data analysis, and work with key techniques for studying gene structure, expression and function such as nucleic acid extraction and synthesis, cloning, bioinformatics analysis, PCR and qPCR. Students will present their results orally and in writing. Enrollment in both semesters (BIOL BC3305 and BIOL BC3306) of this full-year course is required, and fulfills two upper-level lab courses for the Barnard Biology major. Must be taken in sequence, beginning in the fall. -B. Morton & J. Mansfield

Fall 2018: BIOL BC3305
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3305 001/01225 W 1:10pm - 6:00pm
1214 Altschul Hall
Brian Morton 3 12/16

BIOL BC3306 Project Laboratory in Molecular Genetics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC2100 or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 16.

Laboratory course in which students conduct original research projects in molecular genetics. Students will participate in experimental design, conduct and data analysis, and work with key techniques for studying gene structure, expression and function such as nucleic acid extraction and synthesis, cloning, bioinformatics analysis, PCR and qPCR. Students will present their results orally and in writing. Enrollment in both semesters (BIOL BC3305 and BIOL BC3306) of this full-year course is required, and fulfills two upper-level lab courses for the Barnard Biology major. Must be taken in sequence, beginning in the fall. -B. Morton, J. Mansfield

BIOL BC3308 Genomics and Bioinformatics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501, BIOL BC1502, BIOL BC1503 and BIOL BC2100.

Advanced topics in genetics focusing on genome-level features and methods of sequence analysis. The primary emphasis of the course will be on microbial genomic and metagenomic applications but many of the techniques will be applicable to eukaryotic genomics and medical genomics as well. Through this course students will become comfortable with the command line interface, learn basic programming skills, be exposed to a variety of online tools, and become proficient in a number of genomic software packages. This course is an upper-level laboratory.

BIOL BC3310 Cell Biology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501 BIOL BC1502, BIOL BC1503, or equivalent, and BIOL BC2100.

This course explores the components, systems, and regulatory mechanisms involved in eukaryotic cellular function. Topics include: signal transduction, translational and protein quality control, organellar and cytoskeletal dynamics, and some coordinated responses such as proliferation and programmed cell death. Throughout the course we will see how general cell biology can be specialized to achieve specific cellular functions through regulation of the basic machinery. We will also explore the cellular and molecular bases for a variety of human pathologies, with an emphasis on cancer. In addition to lecture, we will spend some time discussing the material, including selected articles from the primary literature, and learning through group presentations.

Fall 2018: BIOL BC3310
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3310 001/06027 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
903 Altschul Hall
Jonathan Snow 3 35/50

BIOL BC3311 Laboratory in Cell Biology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501, BIOL BC1502, BIOL BC1503 or the equivalent, BIOL BC2100. Enrollment limited to 16.

Introduction to cell biological techniques used to investigate structural, molecular, and physiological aspects of eukaryotic cells and their organization into tissues. Techniques include light and electron microscopy, cell culture, isolation of cellular organelles, protein electrophoresis and Western Blot analysis.

Fall 2018: BIOL BC3311
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3311 001/05773 Th 1:10pm - 6:00pm
1015 Altschul Hall
Jonathan Snow 3 16/16

BIOL BC3320 Microbiology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501, BIOL BC1502, BIOL BC1503 or the equivalent, and BIOL BC2100.

Survey of the diversity, cellular organization, physiology, and genetics of the major microbial groups. Also includes aspects of applied microbiology and biotechnology, the function of microorganisms in the environment, and the role of microbes in human diseases.

Fall 2018: BIOL BC3320
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3320 001/01226 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
903 Altschul Hall
JJ Miranda 3 36

BIOL BC3321 Laboratory in Microbiology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501, BIOL BC1502, BIOL BC1503, BIOL BC2100, or the equivalent, and BIOL BC3320 (or corequisite). Enrollment limited to 16.

Provides experience in the isolation, cultivation, and analysis of pure cultures of microorganisms. Methods used for study of cell structure, growth, physiology, and genetics of microbes will be incorporated into small independent projects.

Fall 2018: BIOL BC3321
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3321 001/01227 W 1:10pm - 6:00pm
1316 Altschul Hall
Stephen Sturley 3 14/16
Spring 2019: BIOL BC3321
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3321 001/05862 Th 1:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
JJ Miranda 3 4/16

BIOL BC3352 Development. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501, BIOL BC1502, BIOL BC1503, and BIOL BC2100 or equivalent.

Introduction to developmental biology. Topics will include: fertilization, cleavage and gastrulation, establishment of body axes, neural development, organ formation, regeneration, stem cells and cell potency, evolution of developmental programs.

BIOL BC3360 Physiology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501, BIOL BC1502, BIOL BC1503 or the equivalent.

This course examines how mammals carry out basic functions like manipulating objects, sensing the external world, oxygenating tissues, and processing food.  Emphasis is placed on (a) how the body regulates itself through the integrated action of multiple organ systems and (b) what goes awry in disease.

Spring 2019: BIOL BC3360
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3360 001/05606 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
John Glendinning 3 41

BIOL BC3361 Laboratory in Physiology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Pre- (or co-) requisite is a physiology lecture class (e.g., BIOL BC3360). Enrollment limited to 16.

Provides a hands-on introduction to the different physiological systems in vertebrates and invertebrates. Emphasizes the operation of a variety of physiological monitoring devices and the collection and analysis of physiological data.

Spring 2019: BIOL BC3361
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3361 001/03212 W 1:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
John Glendinning 3 2/16

BIOL BC3362 Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501, BIOL BC1502, BIOL BC1503 or the equivalent, and one term of organic chemistry.

Structure and function of neural membranes; ionic basis of membrane potential and action potential; synaptic transmission and neurochemistry; sensory transduction and processing; reflexes and spinal cord physiology; muscle structure and function; neuronal circuitry; nervous system development.

Fall 2018: BIOL BC3362
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3362 001/07300 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Ll103 Diana Center
Elizabeth Bauer 3 45/75

BIOL BC3363 Laboratory in Molecular and Cell Neuroscience. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC3362 (or corequisite). Enrollment limited to 16.

Introduction to techniques commonly used in current neurobiological research, including intracellular and extracellular recording of action potentials, neuroanatomical methods, and computer simulation of the action potential.

Spring 2019: BIOL BC3363
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3363 001/08377 Th 1:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Elizabeth Bauer 3 2/16
BIOL 3363 002/01157 F 1:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Elizabeth Bauer 3 4/16

BIOL BC3367 Ecophysiology. 3 points.

Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501, BIOL BC1502, and BIOL BC1503, or the equivalent. BIOL BC2280 is recommended.

Individuals, communities and ecosystems are composed of complex organism-environment interactions. We will examine these dynamic relationships in animals at the physiological level, covering basic concepts as they specifically relate to animal fitness. Course focus: how changes in stress and reproductive endocrinology and ecoimmunology relate to individual and population dynamics.

BIOL BC3380 Applied Ecology and Evolution. 3 points.

Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501, BIOL BC1502, BIOL BC1503 or the equivalent.

Ecological and evolutionary models of populations (exponential and density-dependent growth; species interactions; genetic differentiation resulting from mating, random drift, and selection) applied to problems resulting from human-induced environmental change (endangered species; use of pesticides and antibiotics; escaping transgenic organisms; global climate change; emerging pathogens; other invaders; etc.)

BIOL BC3388 Tropical Ecology. 3 points.

Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501, BIOL BC1502, BIOL BC1503 or the equivalent.

Focusing on tropical rain forests, the course explores the contemporary and historical ecological processes that generate and maintain species diversity in the tropics. Topics include biogeography and the latitudinal gradient of diversity, tropical climate and soils, origins of tropical ecosystems, causes and consequences of tropical deforestation, as well as unique ecological patterns and processes in specific tropical regions (Neotropics, African, and Asian tropics).

BIOL BC3590 Senior Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BIOL BC1501, BIOL BC1502, BIOL BC1503, and BIOL BC2100.

Required of all majors who do not select Senior Thesis (BIOL BC3593x / BC3594y) to fulfill the senior requirement, these seminars allow students to explore the primary literature in the Biological Sciences in greater depth than can be achieved in a lecture course. Attention will be focused on both theoretical and empirical work. Seminar periods are devoted to oral reports and discussion of assigned readings and student reports. Students will write one extensive literature review of a topic related to the central theme of the seminar section. Topics vary per semester and include: 1. Plant Development  2. Animal Development and Evolution  3. Molecular Evolution 4. Microbiology and Global Change 5. Genomics 6. Comparative and Reproductive Endocrinology.  

Fall 2018: BIOL BC3590
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3590 001/09282 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
805 Altschul Hall
Hilary Callahan 4 14/13
Spring 2019: BIOL BC3590
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3590 005/03374 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Brian Morton 4 13/12

BIOL BC3591 Guided Research and Seminar. 4 points.

Per Semester

An independent research project in Biology under the guidance of a faculty member and suiting the needs of the individual student. Projects conducted outside of the Barnard Biology Department must have a member of the Department acting as a sponsor. Attendance at a weekly seminar is required. By the end of the year, students write a scientific paper and orally present their results to the Barnard Biology Department. Completion of both BIOL BC3591 and BIOL BC3592 fulfills two upper-level laboratory requirements in the major. Must be taken in sequence, beginning in the fall.

Fall 2018: BIOL BC3591
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3591 001/01445 M 1:10pm - 3:00pm
Ll017 Milstein Center
Jessica Goldstein, Alison Pischedda, JJ Miranda 4 5/15
BIOL 3591 002/05092 M 1:10pm - 3:00pm
308 Diana Center
Jessica Goldstein, Alison Pischedda, JJ Miranda 4 5/15

BIOL BC3592 Guided Research and Seminar. 4 points.

Per Semester

An independent research project in Biology under the guidance of a faculty member and suiting the needs of the individual student. Projects conducted outside of the Barnard Biology Department must have a member of the Department acting as a sponsor. Attendance at a weekly seminar is required. By the end of the year, students write a scientific paper and orally present their results to the Barnard Biology Department. Completion of both BIOL BC3591 and BIOL BC3592 fulfills two upper-level laboratory requirements in the major. Must be taken in sequence, beginning in the fall.

Spring 2019: BIOL BC3592
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3592 001/03012 M 1:10pm - 3:00pm
Room TBA
Jessica Goldstein, Alison Pischedda, JJ Miranda 4 1/13
BIOL 3592 002/08242 M 1:10pm - 3:00pm
Room TBA
Jessica Goldstein, Alison Pischedda, JJ Miranda 4 1/13

BIOL BC3593 Senior Thesis Research. 4 points.

Per Semester

Prerequisites: Permission of a faculty sponsor and the department. Cannot be taken concurrently with BIOL BC3591 or BIOL BC3592.

Same as BIOL BC3591-BC3592, including the weekly seminar. Completion of both BIOL BC3593 and BC3594 fulfills the senior requirement or two upper level laboratory requirements, but not both in the major. Must be taken in sequence, beginning in the fall.

Fall 2018: BIOL BC3593
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3593 001/01777 M 1:10pm - 3:00pm
318 Milbank Hall
Jessica Goldstein, Alison Pischedda, JJ Miranda 4 13/25

BIOL BC3594 Senior Thesis Research. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of a faculty sponsor and the department. Cannot be taken concurrently with BIOL BC3591 or BIOL BC3592.

Same as BIOL BC3591-BC3592, including the weekly seminar. Completion of both BIOL BC3593 and BC3594 fulfills the senior requirement or two upper level laboratory requirements, but not both in the major. Must be taken in sequence, beginning in the fall.

Spring 2019: BIOL BC3594
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3594 001/01445 M 1:10pm - 3:00pm
Room TBA
Jessica Goldstein, Alison Pischedda, JJ Miranda 4 8/13

BIOL BC3597 Guided Research. 1-4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of a faculty sponsor.

Similar to BIOL BC3591x/ BC3592y but a variable point course without seminar or an oral presentation. Does not fulfill Biology major requirements.

Fall 2018: BIOL BC3597
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3597 001/02657  
Elizabeth Bauer 1-4 1
BIOL 3597 002/05459  
Hilary Callahan 1-4 0
BIOL 3597 003/07739  
John Glendinning 1-4 6
BIOL 3597 004/02076  
Paul Hertz 1-4 1
BIOL 3597 005/04087  
Jennifer Mansfield 1-4 0
BIOL 3597 006/09332  
Alison Pischedda 1-4 5
BIOL 3597 007/07198  
Brian Morton 1-4 0
BIOL 3597 008/01732  
Jonathan Snow 1-4 4
BIOL 3597 009/03597  
JJ Miranda 1-4 1
Spring 2019: BIOL BC3597
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 3597 001/03884  
Elizabeth Bauer 1-4 4
BIOL 3597 002/09530  
Hilary Callahan 1-4 0
BIOL 3597 003/00415  
Jonathan Snow 1-4 2
BIOL 3597 004/09651  
John Glendinning 1-4 4
BIOL 3597 006/05717  
Jennifer Mansfield 1-4 0
BIOL 3597 007/09785  
Alison Pischedda 1-4 3
BIOL 3597 008/05266  
Brian Morton 1-4 0
BIOL 3597 009/03445  
Stephen Sturley 1-4 0
BIOL 3597 010/01158  
JJ Miranda 1-4 1

Cross-Listed Courses

Chemistry (Barnard)

CHEM BC3282 Biological Chemistry. 3 points.

Prerequisites: (CHEM BC3230) and (CHEM BC3231) BIOL BC1502. Lecture: MWF 9:00-9:50.

Introduction to biochemical building blocks, macromolecules, and metabolism. Structures of amino acids, lipids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids. Protein structure and folding. Enzyme mechanisms, kinetics, allostery. Membranes and biosignaling. Catabolism and anabolism with emphasis on chemical intermediates, metabolic energy, catalysis by specific enzymes, regulation.

Fall 2018: CHEM BC3282
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHEM 3282 001/04565 M W F 9:00am - 9:50am
202 Altschul Hall
Mary Sever 3 72
Spring 2019: CHEM BC3282
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHEM 3282 001/01161 M W F 10:00am - 10:50am
Room TBA
Mary Sever 3 36/50

CHEM BC3355 Biochemistry Laboratory Techniques. 5 points.

Prerequisites: Organic II lab (CHEM BC3333, BC3335, or equivalent); Quantitative analysis lab (BC3338, BC3340, or equivalent); Biochemistry (CHEM BC3282y, CHEM C3501, or equivalent). Lecture: T 1:10-12:50; Laboratory two afternoons: T 2:10-6:00 / TH 1:10-5:00.

Theory and application of fundamental techniques for the isolation, synthesis and characterization of biological macromolecules including proteins, lipids, nucleotides and carbohydrates.  Techniques include spectroscopic analysis, gel electrophoresis, chromatography, enzyme kinetics, immunoblotting, PCR, molecular cloning and cell culture, as well as modern laboratory instrumentation, such as UV-Vis, GC-MS and HPLC.

Spring 2019: CHEM BC3355
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHEM 3355 001/06227 T 1:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Subhasish Chatterjee, Grace Lee 5 11/14
CHEM 3355 001/06227 Th 1:10pm - 5:00pm
Room TBA
Subhasish Chatterjee, Grace Lee 5 11/14
CHEM 3355 001/06227 T 2:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Subhasish Chatterjee, Grace Lee 5 11/14

CHEM BC3357 Biochemistry Laboratory Techniques. 3 points.

Fee: $45.

Prerequisites: four terms of chemistry and biology laboratory.
Corequisites: BIOC C3501 or BCHM G4021.

Lecture and lab. Same course as BC3355, but only one section of lab hours required.

Neuroscience and Behavior (Barnard)

NSBV BC3367 Transformative Landmarks in Neuroscience. 4 points.

Not offered during 2018-19 academic year.

Modern neuroscience incorporates topics from molecular neurobiology to cognition. Cognate disciplines include psychology, biology, biochemistry, chemistry, neuropharmacology, neurology and psychiatry, physics, computational science. We review neuroscience landmarks through readings of scientific publications, news reports, and controversies surrounding apparently transformative research, and contemplate contemporary viewpoints that have the benefit of hindsight.