Race & Ethnic Studies

http://ccis.barnard.edu/

221 Barnard Hall
212-854-6146
ccis@barnard.edu

Mission

The purpose of the Interdisciplinary Concentration on Race and Ethnicity (ICORE) and Minor on Race and Ethnicity (MORE) is to make available to Barnard students the interdisciplinary and critical study of race and ethnicity in their mutual constitution with gender, class, and nation. ICORE and MORE provide an intersectional and international framework for thinking through issues of ethnicity and race in both local and global contexts and in relation to other forms of social difference. Advanced seminars allow students to use this framework for the in-depth study of a particular topic. For those students who desire to pursue graduate education in the field of Ethnic Studies, ICORE and MORE will provide background preparation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Students who complete either the Interdisciplinary Concentration or Minor on Race and Ethnicity will learn how to:

  1. Gain exposure to the theories and methods of Ethnic Studies;
  2. Interpret arguments in light of the expanding literature in Ethnic Studies;
  3. Understand processes of racialization in historical and geographical context;
  4. Understand the mutual constitution and relative autonomy of axes of social differentiation;
  5. Comprehend how national boundaries, as well as local, national and transnational cultures and politics affect the constitution of racial and ethnic categories;
  6. Compare representations of borderlands, hybridity, migration and diaspora from different cultures; and
  7. Identify and communicate the importance of ethnic and racial diversity to an increasingly global and interconnected world.

Interdisciplinary Concentration on Race and Ethnicity (ICORE) and Minor on Race and Ethnicity (MORE)

This program is supervised by the Steering Committee of the Consortium for Critical Interdisciplinary Studies (CCIS) at Barnard:

Professors: Tina Campt (Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Director of Africana Studies), Neferti X. M. Tadiar (Chair of Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies)
Associate Professors: Jennie Kassanoff (English and Director of the American Studies), Monica Miller (English and Coordinator of the Consortium for Critical Interdisciplinary Studies)

Interdisciplinary Concentration on Race and Ethnicity (ICORE) and Minor on Race and Ethnicity (MORE)

The concentration and minor consist of five courses to be distributed as follows:

Introductory Level (2 courses)
CSER UN1040Critical Approaches to the Study of Ethnicity and Race3
WMST BC2140Critical Approaches in Social and Cultural Theory3
Intermediate Level (2 courses)
Harlem:
Select one of the following:3
Harlem Crossroads
Harlem Seminar: Gay Harlem
The Visual Culture of the Harlem Renaissance
Literature of the Great Migration: 1916-1970
Home to Harlem: Literature of the Harlem Renaissance
Religions of Harlem
Concepts in Race and Ethnic Studies:
Select one course from among the following three topics (see below)3
Advanced Level (1 course)
Select one course from the following groups:3-4
Relevant Seminars in the Consortium Majors:
Students should check with the department offering the seminar for course application/admission procedures
Africana Colloquium
Africana Issues: Diasporas of the Indian Ocean
Race/Sexuality Science and Social Practice
Asian Americans and the Psychology of Race
Race in Scientific and Social Practice
Colonization/Decolonization
Historical Anthropology of the US-Mexico Border
Comparative Study of Constitutional Challenges Affecting African, Latino, and Asian American Communities
Performing the Political: Embodying Change in American Performance
Senior Seminar: Senior Seminar for Writing Concentrators
The Fourteenth Amendment and Its Uses
Remembering Slavery: Critiquing Modern Representations of the Peculiar Institution
Inequalities:Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Latin America
Perspectives on Power in 20th Century Latin America
Lagos: From Pepper Farm to Megacity
Bombay/Mumbai and Its Urban Imaginaries
Gender and Migration: A Global Perspective
Latin Music and Identity (formerly LATS W3926x)
Religion, Gender, and Violence
Senior Seminar: Emotions in Modern Spanish Culture
Gender, Globalization, and Empire
Feminist Postcolonial Theory
Sexuality and Science
Queer Theories and Histories
Special Topics in Critical Studies:

Concepts in Race and Ethnic Studies topics

People, Power, and Place
Courses that explore in geographical context the processes, including the operations of power, by which people are constituted as ethnic and racial groups
AFEN BC3525Atlantic Crossings: The West Indies and the Atlantic World4
AFRS BC3055Slave Resistance in the United States from the Colonial Era to the Civil War3
AFRS BC2005Caribbean Culture and Societies3
AFRS/WMST BC3121Black Women in America4
AFRS BC3589Black Feminism(s)/Womanism(s)4
ANTH UN3300Pre-Columbian Histories of Native America3
ANTH V3810Madagascar4
CSER W1012History of Racialization in the United States3
CSER V3440The Changing American City4
CSER UN3490Post 9/11 Immigration Policies4
CSER W3510Novels of Immigration, Relocation, and Diaspora4
HIST BC2321Colonial Encounters: Europe and the Culture of Empire3
HIST BC2840Topics in South Asian History3
HIST BC2980World Migration3
POLS V3604Civil Wars and International Intervention in Africa3
RELI W4215Hinduism Here4
RELI W4620Religious Worlds of New York4
SOCI V3247The Immigrant Experience, Old and New3
SOCI V3324Poverty, Inequality, and Policy: A Sociological Perspective4
SOCI BC3907Communities and Social Change4
SOCI BC3909Ethnic Conflict and Unrest4
WMST/AFRS BC3121Black Women in America4
WMST UN3915Gender and Power in Transnational Perspective4
Representation
Courses that explore cultural and political representations of ethnicity and race
AFRS BC3120History of African-American Music3
AFRS BC3146African American and African Writing and the Screen4
AFRS BC3150Race and Performance In The Caribbean4
AHIS BC3642North American Art and Culture3
AHIS W4089Native American Art3
ANTH V3160The Body and Society3
ANTH V3928Religious Mediation4
CLRS W4190Race, Ethnicity, and Narrative, in the Russian/Soviet Empire3
CSER UN3701US Latina/o Cultural Production4
CSER UN3904Rumor and Racial Conflict4
CSER UN3922Asian American Cinema (formerly ASAM W3992x)4
CSER UN3970Arabs in Literature and Film4
DNCE BC3570Latin American and Caribbean Dance: Identities in Motion3
DNCE BC3578Traditions of African-American Dance3
ENGL BC3190Global Literature in English3
ENTH BC3144Black Theatre4
ENGL BC3997Senior Seminar: Senior Seminar for Writing Concentrators4
ENGL BC3998Senior Seminars: Human & Other Animal Identities4
ENWS BC3144Minority Women Writers in the United States3
SOCI BC3913Inequalities: Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in U.S. Law and Society4
SPAN BC3470Latin(o) American Art in New York City: Critical Interventions, Institutions, and Creative Lives3
WMST BC3134Unheard Voices: African Women's Literature4
WMST BC3132Gendered Controversies: Women's Bodies and Global Conflicts4
WMST BC3510Interpreting Bodies: Engendering the Black Body4

Note: Students may petition for ICORE/MORE credit for courses not on this list.

Cross-Listed Courses

Africana Studies (Barnard)

AFRS BC2005 Caribbean Culture and Societies. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Multidisciplinary exploration of the Anglophone, Hispanic, and Francophone Caribbean.  Discusses theories about the development and character of Caribbean societies; profiles representative islands; and explores enduring and contemporary issues in Caribbean Studies (race, color and class; politics and governance; political economy; the struggles for liberation; cultural identity and migration.) BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

Fall 2017: AFRS BC2005
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AFRS 2005 001/01277 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
307 Milbank Hall
Maja Horn 3 20

AFRS BC3020 Harlem Crossroads. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Studies Harlem in the context of African-American and African diaspora culture and society as well as American urbanization. Primarily focusing on Harlem of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the course offers students opportunities to discuss political economy, immigration, migration and the role of the city in social life.

AFRS BC3055 Slave Resistance in the United States from the Colonial Era to the Civil War. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Analyzes the multifaceted nature of slave resistance, its portrayal and theorization by scholars.  Critically examines the various pathways of resistance of enslaved Africans and African-Americans, both individually and collectively (e.g., running away, non-cooperation, theft, arson, as well as verbal and physical confrontation, revolts and insurrections).  Considers how gender shaped acts of resistance.

AFRS BC3110 Africana Colloquium. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Students must attend first day of class and admission will be decided then. Enrollment limited to 18 students. Priority will be given to Africana majors and CCIS students (Africana Studies, American Studies and Women's Studies majors; minors in Race and Ethnic Studies).

Spring 2017: AFRS BC3110
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AFRS 3110 001/05430 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
403 Barnard Hall
Celia Naylor 4 11/18
Fall 2017: AFRS BC3110
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AFRS 3110 001/01852 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
404 Barnard Hall
Yvette Christianse 4 8

AFRS BC3120 History of African-American Music. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Survey interrogates the cultural and aesthetic development of a variety of interconnected musical genres - such as blues, jazz, gospel, soul, funk, R&B, hip-hop, classical and their ever changing same/names - viewed as complex human activities daringly danced at dangerous discourses inside and outside the American cultural mainstreams.

AFRS BC3146 African American and African Writing and the Screen. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Focuses on the context and history of representations of African Americans and Africans in early American and other cinematographies; the simultaneous development of early film and the New Negro, Negritude and Pan African movements; and pioneer African American and African cinema.

AFRS BC3148 Literature of the Great Migration. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

(Also ENGL BC 3148) Examination of fiction, poetry, essays and films about the Great Migration (1910-1950) of African-Americans from the rural South to the urban North, focusing on literary production in New York and Chicago. (This course satisfies the Harlem Requirement for the Africana Studies major).

AFRS BC3150 Race and Performance In The Caribbean. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Sophomore Standing. Enrollment limited to 18 students.

Analysis of the shifting place and perception of Afro-Caribbean performance in Caribbean societies. This course takes a cross-cultural approach that examines performance through the lens of ethnography, anthropology, music and literary criticism.

AFRS BC3550 Harlem Seminar: Gay Harlem. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Prerequisites: This course is limited to 20 students and by permission only.

This course explores Harlem's role in the production of sexual modernity and in particular as a space of queer encounter. While much of our investigation will be devoted to the intersection of race and sexuality in African American life, we also consider Harlem's history as a communal space for Italian, Puerto Rican, and more recent immigrants. Students will be encouraged to distinguish and connect contemporary sites of sexual culture in Harlem to the historical articulations of race and sexuality examined in the course.

Fall 2017: AFRS BC3550
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AFRS 3550 001/01337 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
323 Milbank Hall
Richard Blint 4 21/25

AFRS BC3570 Africana Issues: Diasporas of the Indian Ocean. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The Indian Ocean has been called the cradle of globalization, a claim bolstered by seasonal monsoon winds and the trade that these enabled. We will consider the aesthetic histories of such trade by engaging literary and other cultural exchanges (including film, visual arts, music, and dance). What did the Zulu prophet Isaiah Shembe learn from Gujarati poets? Other than a major slaving center and source of spices, what role did Zanzibar play in the development of music and literary forms that look to Oman as well as the East Coast of Africa? We focus on four sites: Durban (South Africa), Bombay (India), Zanzibar (Tanzania) and Port Louis (Mauritius). This course will be taught simultaneously between Barnard in New York and the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. Students from both campuses will be encouraged to interact electronically and to establish a blog and website. The course will also have live-streamed guest speakers from chosen sites around the Indian Ocean.

AFRS BC3589 Black Feminism(s)/Womanism(s). 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Black Feminism(s)/Womanism(s)

Spring 2017: AFRS BC3589
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AFRS 3589 001/08835 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
502 Diana Center
Celia Naylor 4 19

Anthropology (Barnard)

ANTH V3160 The Body and Society. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 40; not open to first-years.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Non-anthropology majors require the instructor's permission.

Introduction to medical anthropology, exploring health, affliction, and healing cross-culturally. Draws from theory and methods to address critiques of biomedical, epidemiological, and other models of disease; the roles of healers in different societies; the inseparable nature of religion and healing; and different conceptions of the body and how this affects cultural conceptions of health. 

ANTH UN3300 Pre-Columbian Histories of Native America. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Enrollment limited to 40.

This course explores 10,000 years of the North American archaeological record, bringing to light the unwritten histories of Native Americans prior to European contact. Detailed consideration of major pre-Columbian sites is interwoven with the insight of contemporary native peoples to provide both a scientific and humanist reconstruction of the past.

Spring 2017: ANTH UN3300
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3300 001/09998 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
202 Altschul Hall
Severin Fowles 3 113/150

ANTH V3810 Madagascar. 4 points.

Enrollment limit is 15.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Non-Anthropology majors require the instructor's permission.

Critiques the many ways the great Red Island has been described and imagined by explorers, colonists, social scientists, and historians—as an Asian-African amalgamation, an ecological paradise, and a microcosm of the Indian Ocean. Religious diasporas, mercantilism, colonization, enslavement, and race and nation define key categories of comparative analysis.

ANTH V3928 Religious Mediation. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 16. Instructor's permission is required.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Reading theories of media and of religion, we will examine how transformations in media technology shift the ways in which religion is encoded into semiotic forms, how these forms are realized in performative contexts, and how these affect the constitution of religious subjects and religious authority. Topics include word, print, image, and sound in relation to Islam, Pentecostalism, Buddhism and animist religions.

ANTH V3988 Race/Sexuality Science and Social Practice. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 26.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Scientific inquiry has configured race and sex in distinctive ways. This class will engage critical theories of race and feminist considerations of sex, gender, and sexuality through the lens of the shifting ways in which each has been conceptualized, substantiated, classified, and managed in (social) science and medicine.

Art History (Barnard)

AHIS BC3948 The Visual Culture of the Harlem Renaissance. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 15 students. Barnard Art History seminar application required. See dept. website for application and instructions. www.barnard.edu/arthist

Introduction to the paintings, photographs, sculptures, films, and graphic arts of the Harlem Renaissance and the publications, exhibitions, and institutions involved in the production and consumption of images of African-Americans. Focuses on impact of Black northward and transatlantic migration and the roles of region, class, gender, and sexuality.

AHIS W4089 Native American Art. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This introduction to Native North American art surveys traditions of painting, sculpture, ceramics, textiles, photography, and architecture, and traces the careers of contemporary Indian modernists and postmodernists. It emphasizes artistic developments as a means of preserving culture and resisting domination in response to intertribal contact, European colonization, and American expansion.

Comparative Literature (Barnard)

CLRS W4190 Race, Ethnicity, and Narrative, in the Russian/Soviet Empire. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines the literary construction of ethnic and cultural identity in texts drawn from the literatures of ethnic minorities and non-Slavic nationalities that coexist within the Russian and Soviet imperial space, with attention to the historical and political context in which literary discourses surrounding racial, ethnic, and cultural particularity develop. Organized around three major regions -- the Caucasus, Central Asia, and the Russian Far East --readings include canonical "classics" by Aitmatov, Iskander, and Rytkheu as well as less-known texts, both "official" and censored. 

Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race

CSER W1012 History of Racialization in the United States. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The History of Racialization in the United States examines the development of race and racism through the study of significant historical circumstances that define the institutional structure of American Empire and of the resulting interactions among its peoples. Race is not static. Consequently, it is not an ahistorical object, nor a predetermined identity, nor a uniform category of analysis. Traditionally, the history of American race relations is the contact between racially defined groups over time and space of the effort required to maintain social and economic differences among them. Racialization, then, refers to the process by which one population group or many are "placed" in distinct racial categories. 

CSER V3440 The Changing American City. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

After decades of economic disinvestment, physical decline and social out-migration, the 1990s ushered in an era of urban revitalization in many U.S. cities, the effects of which resonate today. How can we situate these recent changes within a longer trajectory of urban change in the United States? What do we make of the contested claims on space, belonging and identity made by, or on behalf of, people living in changing urban places? How should we evaluate development interventions whose end results seem so often to diverge from their intentions?     This course will develop practical inroads into the problem of the changing American city that will both complement and complicate commonplace intuitions about the urban change we witness unfolding around us. Readings stay close to anthropological and ethnographic perspectives. We will consider how focusing on the meanings and experiences of everyday life in urban spaces can problematize ideals often associated with urban living, including various forms of diversity. Additional readings will introduce students to analytical perspectives on urbanism, race, ethnicity, space and citizenship. Taken together, readings, primary materials, discussions and a field trip will equip students with the tools to approach contemporary urban change with an anthropological lens.

CSER W3510 Novels of Immigration, Relocation, and Diaspora. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Course listed as ENGL W3510.

The master narrative of the United States has always vacillated between valorizations of movement and settlement. While ours is a nation of immigrants, one which privileges its history of westward expansion and pioneering, trailblazing adventurers, we also seem to long for what Wallace Stegner called a “sense of place,” a true belonging within a single locale. Each of these constructions has tended to focus on individuals with a tremendous degree of agency in terms of where and whether they go. However, it is equally important to understand the tension between movement and stasis within communities most frequently subjected to spatial upheavals. To that end, this course is designed to examine narratives of immigration, migration, relocation, and diaspora by authors of color in the United States.

CSER UN3904 Rumor and Racial Conflict. 4 points.

This course will take a transnational look at the strange ways that race and mass rumors have interacted. From the judicial and popular riots in the U.S. justified by recurrent rumors of African-American insurrection, to accusations that French Jews were players in the 'white slave trade,' to tales of white fat-stealing monsters among indigenous people of Bolivia and Peru, rumors play a key role in constructing, enforcing, and contesting regimes of racial identity and domination. In order to grasp rumor's importance for race, we will need to understand how it works, so our readings will cover both instances of racialized rumor-telling, conspiracy theories and mass panics, and some key approaches to how rumors work as a social phenomenon. The instructor will expect you to post a response to the reading on Courseworks each week and to engage actively in class discussion. There will be an in-class midterm exam, and you will be able to choose between writing an independent research project or doing a take-home exam.

Fall 2017: CSER UN3904
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CSER 3904 001/28274 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
509 Hamilton Hall
Stuart Rockefeller 4 6/22

CSER W3906 Race in Scientific and Social Practice. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This class presents a genealogy of the development of the race concept since the 19th century. Most centrally, we will examine the ways in which race been conceptualized, substantiated, classified, managed and "observed" in (social) science and medicine. We will read that history of science in tandem with philosophical, anthropological, and historical literatures on race and the effects of racial practices in the social and political world writ large. This class will address a series of questions, historical and contemporary. For example, how has the relationship between "race" and "culture" been articulated in the history of anthropology in particular, and in racial theory more broadly? How and why were particular phenotypes understood to signify meaningful biological and social differences? Can there be a concept of race without phenotype—a solely genotypic racial grouping? More broadly, we will examine how particular scientific projects have intersected with, authorized, or enabled specific social and political imaginations.

CSER UN3928 Colonization/Decolonization. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Enrollment limited to 22.

Prerequisites: Open to CSER majors/concentrators only. Others may be allowed to register with the instructor's permission.

This course explores the centrality of colonialism in the making of the modern world, emphasizing cross-cultural and social contact, exchange, and relations of power; dynamics of conquest and resistance; and discourses of civilization, empire, freedom, nationalism, and human rights, from 1500 to 2000. Topics include pre-modern empires; European exploration, contact, and conquest in the new world; Atlantic-world slavery and emancipation; and European and Japanese colonialism in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. The course ends with a section on decolonization and post-colonialism in the period after World War II. Intensive reading and discussion of primary documents.

Spring 2017: CSER UN3928
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CSER 3928 001/11217 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
420 Hamilton Hall
Karl Jacoby 4 21/22
Fall 2017: CSER UN3928
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CSER 3928 001/17636 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
420 Hamilton Hall
Natasha Lightfoot 4 20/22

CSER UN3940 Comparative Study of Constitutional Challenges Affecting African, Latino, and Asian American Communities. 4 points.

This course will examine how the American legal system decided constitutional challenges affecting the empowerment of African, Latino, and Asian American communities from the 19th century to the present. Focus will be on the role that race, citizenship, capitalism/labor, property, and ownership played in the court decision in the context of the historical, social, and political conditions existing at the time. Topics include the denial of citizenship and naturalization to slaves and immigrants, government sanctioned segregation, the struggle for reparations for descendants of slavery, and Japanese Americans during World War II.

Spring 2017: CSER UN3940
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CSER 3940 001/15645 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
420 Hamilton Hall
Elizabeth OuYang 4 21/22

CSER G4030 Sound: The Sacred, The Secular. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Currently, there is no course in the ethnomusicology program that explores the relation between sound, the secular, and the sacred.  This is largely a reflection of the general trend of the past two decades in the field in which the study of popular music has been privileged.  However, historically and today, sound, music, and the acoustic more generally, have been a central arena for the negotiation of the relationship between the sacred and the secular, the definition of the idea of religion and the structure and significance of ritual. Recently, we have seen an intensification of scholarship on the question of religion from the social sciences and the humanities that recasts the question of the relation between the secular and the sacred through critical theory.  Yet the acoustical overtones of this critical "turn" to religion have seldom have explored.  This course seeks to explore the acoustic dimensions of critically thinking the idea of sound for understanding different aspects of the secular and the sacred.  The term sound is used instead of music because in many expressive traditions, the Western concept of music does not necessarily encompass notions of recitation, chant, or other modalities of sound.

Dance (Barnard)

DNCE BC3570 Latin American and Caribbean Dance: Identities in Motion. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines the history and choreographic features of Latin American and Caribbean dance forms. Dances are analyzed in order to uncover the ways in which dancing shapes national, racial, and gender identities. Focuses on the globalization of these dances in New York City.

DNCE BC3578 Traditions of African-American Dance. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Traces the development of African-American dance, emphasizing the contribution of black artists and the influence of black traditions on American theatrical dance. Major themes include the emergence of African-American concert dance, the transfer of vernacular forms to the concert stage, and issues of appropriation, cultural self-identification, and artistic hybridity.

DNCE BC3980 Performing the Political: Embodying Change in American Performance. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: An introductory course in dance or theatre history or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 12 students.

Exploration into the politics of performance and the performance of politics through the lens of 20th-century American dance.

English (Barnard)

ENGL BC3129 Explorations of Black Literature: Early African-American Lit. 1760-1890. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students.

Poetry, prose, fiction, and nonfiction, with special attention to the slave narrative. Includes Wheatley, Douglass, and Jacobs, but emphasis will be on less familiar writers such as Brown, Harper, Walker, Wilson, and Forten. Works by some 18th-century precursors will also be considered.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3129
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3129 001/08519 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
405 Barnard Hall
Quandra Prettyman 3 14/18

ENGL BC3134 Creative Non-Fiction. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

In this course, we'll learn some of the techniques involved in writing an entertaining, informative profile.  Topics we will cover in reading and writing assignments will include the question of "objectivity" in profile-writing, how to convey complex controversies in lucid, lively prose, how to structure a long form article, strategies for interviewing difficult interview subjects, and what makes an enticing lede.

ENTH BC3144 Black Theatre. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Exploration of Black Theater, specifically African-American performance traditions, as an intervening agent in racial, cultural, and national identity. African-American theatre artists to be examined include Amiri Baraka, Kia Corthron, W.E.B. Du Bois, Angelina Grimke, Langston Hughes, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Adrienne Kennedy, Suzan-Lori Parks, Adrian Piper, and August Wilson. Fulfills one (of two) required courses in dramatic literature for Theatre/Drama and Theatre Arts major.

Spring 2017: ENTH BC3144
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENTH 3144 001/03482 Th 11:00am - 12:50pm
407 Barnard Hall
Pamela Cobrin 4 20/15

ENWS BC3144 Minority Women Writers in the United States. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Literature of the 20th-century minority women writers in the United States, with emphasis on works by Asian, Black, Hispanic, and Native American women. The historical and cultural as well as the literary framework.

ENGL BC3190 Global Literature in English. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

  Selective survey of fiction from the ex-colonies, focusing on the colonial encounter, cultural and political decolonization, and belonging and migration in the age of postcolonial imperialism. Areas covered include Africa (Achebe, Aidoo, Armah, Ngugi); the Arab World (Mahfouz, Munif, Salih, Souief); South Asia (Mistry, Rushdie, Suleri); the Carribean (Kincaid); and New Zealand (Hulme).

ENGL BC3196 Home to Harlem: Literature of the Harlem Renaissance. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 20 students.

In the spring of 2016, ENGL 3196y will be centered on the relationship between art, activism and social justice as this relationship was developed during the Harlem Renaissance and beyond. Exploring the cultural contexts and aesthetic debates that animated Harlem in 1920s to 1930s, the course will focus on the politics of literary and theatrical production, and explore the fashioning and performance of New Negro identity through fiction, poetry, essays, and artwork, with special attention to theater/performance. This course will partner with Harlem's National Black Theater and work toward an understanding of the relationship between art/literature and socio-political change through the NBT's spring 2016 production of Dominique Morisseau's Blood on the Root, a multi-genre performance piece on racial injustice inspired by the 2006 Jena Six case in Louisiana.

History (Barnard)

HIST BC2321 Colonial Encounters: Europe and the Culture of Empire. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

Examines the shaping of European cultural identity through encounters with non-European cultures from 1500 to the post-colonial era. Novels, paintings, and films will be among the sources used to examine such topics as exoticism in the Enlightenment, slavery and European capitalism, Orientalism in art, ethnographic writings on the primitive, and tourism.

HIST BC2840 Topics in South Asian History. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Some background in non-Western history is recommended.

Examines caste and gender as an important lens for understanding the transformations of intimate life and political culture in colonial and post-colonial India. Topics include: conjugality; popular culture violence, sex and the state; and the politics of untouchability.

HIST BC2980 World Migration. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Overview of human migration from pre-history to the present. Sessions on classical Rome; Jewish diaspora; Viking, Mongol, and Arab conquests; peopling of New World, European colonization, and African slavery; 19th-century European mass migration; Chinese and Indian diasporas; resurgence of global migration in last three decades, and current debates.

HIST BC3546 The Fourteenth Amendment and Its Uses. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

The role of the 14th Amendment in shaping the modern American Constitution; theories of judicial review; the rise and fall of economic due process; the creation of civil liberties; the civil rights revolution; and the end of states' rights.

HIST BC3587 Remembering Slavery: Critiquing Modern Representations of the Peculiar Institution. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

The enslavement of people of African descent signifies a crucial historical and cultural marker not only for African-Americans but also for Americans in general. We will interrogate how and why images of slavery continue to be invoked within the American sociocultural landscape (e.g., in films, documentaries, historical novels, and science fiction).

HIST BC3669 Inequalities:Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Latin America. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required. A general background on Latin America recommended but not absolutely required. Course limited to 15 students.

Latin America has long been characterized by extreme and enduring inequalities - of class, income, race, and ethnicity. Examines patterns of inequality from different disciplinary perspectives, both historically and in the present. Examines not only causes and solutions but how scholars have approached inequality as an intellectual problem.

HIST BC3672 Perspectives on Power in 20th Century Latin America. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Examination of recent Latin American historiography concerns with power in the context of 20th-Century Latin America. Focus on such diverse topics as the Mexican Revolution and migrant culture in Costa Rica, labor mobilization in Chile and the dirty war in Argentina. Themes include the relationship between popular culture and the state; the power of words and the power of symbols; structure and agency; the role of the law; the relationship between leaders and followers; and the intersections of gender, race, and power.

HIST BC3791 Lagos: From Pepper Farm to Megacity. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Examines the many Lagoses that have existed over time, in space, and in the imagination from its origins to the 21st century. This is a reading, writing, viewing, and listening intensive course. We read scholarly, policy-oriented, and popular sources on Lagos as well as screening films and audio recordings that feature Lagos in order to learn about the social, cultural, and intellectual history of this West African mega-city.

HIST BC3870 Gender and Migration: A Global Perspective. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required. Sophomore Standing.

Explores migration as a gendered process and what factors account for migratory differences by gender across place and time; including labor markets, education demographic and family structure, gender ideologies, religion, government regulations and legal status, and intrinsic aspects of the migratory flow itself.

Political Science (Barnard)

POLS V3604 Civil Wars and International Intervention in Africa. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 110.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: at least sophomore standing, except in consultation with the instructor.

This course analyzes the causes of violence in civil wars. It examines the debates around emergency aid, peacekeeping and peacebuilding. In addition, it focuses on recent conflict situations in Africa -- especially Congo, Sudan, and Rwanda -- as a background against which to understand the distinct dynamics of violence, peace, and international interventions in civil conflicts. (Cross-listed by the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race.)

Religion (Barnard)

RELI V2615 Religions of Harlem. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Through a range of field exercises and classroom guests, this course will introduce students to the rich religious history of Harlem, while also challenging them to document and analyze the diversity of Harlem's contemporary religious scene.

RELI W4215 Hinduism Here. 4 points.

Historical, theological, social and ritual dimensions of "lived Hinduism" in the greater New York area. Sites selected for in-depth study include worshipping communities, retreat centers, and national organizations with significant local influence. Significant fieldwork component

RELI W4620 Religious Worlds of New York. 4 points.

This seminar teaches ethnographic approaches to studying religious life with a special focus on urban religion and religions of New York. Students develop in-depth analyses of religious communities using these methods. Course readings address both ethnographic methods and related ethical and epistemological issues, as well as substantive topical issues of central importance to the study of urban religion, including transnationalism and immigration, religious group life and its relation to local community life, and issues of ethnicity, race and cosmopolitanism in pluralistic communities.

RELI W4825 Religion, Gender, and Violence. 4 points.

Investigates relations among religion, gender, and violence in the world today. Focuses on specific traditions with emphasis on historical change, variation, and differences in geopolitical location within each tradition, as well as among them at given historical moments.

Sociology (Barnard)

SOCI V3247 The Immigrant Experience, Old and New. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The immigrant experience in the United States. Topics include ideologies of the melting pot; social, cultural, and economic life of earlier immigrants; the distinctiveness of the African-American experience; recent surge of "new" immigrants (Asians, Latinos, West Indians); and changing American views of immigration.

SOCI V3324 Poverty, Inequality, and Policy: A Sociological Perspective. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Introductory course in Sociology is suggested.

Examination of poverty, the "underclass," and inequality in the United States. Part 1: The moral premises, social theories, and political interests shaping current debates about the poor. Part 2: A more concrete analysis of the lives of the poor and the causes of family breakdown, the drug economy, welfare, employment, and homelessness.

SOCI BC3907 Communities and Social Change. 4 points.

Examines how changes in the economy, racial composition, and class relations affect community life-how it is created, changed and sometimes lost-with a specific focus on the local urban context. Student research projects will address how contemporary forces such as neoliberalization, gentrification and tourism impact a community's social fabric.

SOCI BC3909 Ethnic Conflict and Unrest. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing. SOCI BC1003 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Post-1965 immigration in the U.S. has prompted conflicts between new immigrant groups and established racial and ethnic groups. This seminar explores ethnic conflict and unrest that takes place in the streets, workplace, and everyday social life. Focus is on sociological theories that explain the tensions associated with the arrival of new immigrants.

SOCI BC3913 Inequalities: Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in U.S. Law and Society. 4 points.

This class will examine the historical roots and ongoing persistence of social, economic, and political inequality and the continuing role that it plays in U.S. society by examining how such issues have been addressed both in social science and in law.

Spring 2017: SOCI BC3913
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3913 001/05930 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
502 Diana Center
John Salyer 4 29

Spanish and Latin American Cultures (Barnard)

SPAN BC3470 Latin(o) American Art in New York City: Critical Interventions, Institutions, and Creative Lives. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

Considers the trajectory and intervention of Latin(o) American art in New York City's artistic landscape. We will map the relation between Latin(o) American art and key art institutions, study critical receptions, and look at some of the lives and works of Latin(o) American artists in NYC. 

SPAN BC3990 Senior Seminar: Emotions in Modern Spanish Culture. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Prerequisites: Course intended to be taken by all Spanish majors during the fall of their senior year. Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350).

The Spanish transition from the Ancien Régime to modernity (constitutional government and citizenship, a new class system, changing conceptions of gender and race) involved both the appearance of historically new emotions (beginning with patriotic and romantic love) and the establishment of emotional regimes that regulated allowable and forbidden feelings and practices. We will explore this process through a combination of readings in affect theory and examples of nineteenth-century print culture (literature, journalism, political speech, etc.). Seniors will write papers about related problematics in the context of the cultural production of Spain, from the nineteenth century to the present.

Fall 2017: SPAN BC3990
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 3990 001/08091 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
306 Milbank Hall
Wadda Rios-Font 3 12/15

Women's Studies (Barnard)

WMST BC2140 Critical Approaches in Social and Cultural Theory. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Introduction to key concepts from social theory as they are appropriated in critical studies of gender, race, sexuality, class and nation. We will explore how these concepts are taken up from different perspectives to address particular social problems, and the effects of these appropriations in the world.

Spring 2017: WMST BC2140
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WMST 2140 001/09334 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
323 Milbank Hall
Alexander Pittman 3 57/100
Fall 2017: WMST BC2140
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WMST 2140 001/02265 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
323 Milbank Hall
Alexander Pittman 3 49

WMST BC3121 Black Women in America. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Students must attend first day of class and admission will be decided then. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Examines roles of black women in the U.S. as thinkers, activists and creators during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Focusing on the intellectual work, social activism and cultural expression of African American women, we examine how they understood their lives, resisted oppression and struggled to change society. We will also discuss theoretical frameworks (such as "double jeopardy," or "intersectionality") developed for the study of black women. The seminar will encourage students to pay particular attention to the diversity of black women and critical issues facing Black women today. This course is the same as AFRS BC3121 Black Women in America.

WMST BC3132 Gendered Controversies: Women's Bodies and Global Conflicts. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I).

Investigates the significance of contemporary and historical issues of social, political, and cultural conflicts centered on women's bodies. How do such conflicts constitute women, and what do they tell us about societies, cultures, and politics? - D. Ko

Spring 2017: WMST BC3132
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WMST 3132 001/05173 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
405 Barnard Hall
Janet Jakobsen 4 27

WMST BC3134 Unheard Voices: African Women's Literature. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 14 students.

How does one talk of women in Africa without thinking of Africa as a ‘mythic unity’? We will consider the political, racial, social and other contexts in which African women write and are written about in the context of their located lives in Africa and in the African Diaspora. This course is the same as AFRS BC3134 Unheard Voices: African Women's Literature.

WMST BC3510 Interpreting Bodies: Engendering the Black Body. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Students must attend first day of class and admission will be decided then. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

This course examines how the body functions as an analytic model and a process of embodiment by focusing on the black female body in particular. Looking at feminist theorizing of the black body, it explores how the black female body has been marked in particular ways and with profound effects.

WMST BC3518 Studies in U.S. Imperialism. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I).

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Historical, comparative study of the cultural effects and social experiences of U.S. Imperialism, with attention to race, gender and sexuality in practices of political, economic, and cultural domination and struggle. Material includes studies of US Imperialism in the Philippines, Puerto Rico, Hawaii, Guam, and Cuba and US foreign involvements in the developing world since World War II.

WMST UN3915 Gender and Power in Transnational Perspective. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.

Prerequisites: Instructor approval required

Considers formations of gender, sexuality, and power as they circulate transnationally, as well as transnational feminist movements that have emerged to address contemporary gendered inequalities. Topics include political economy, global care chains, sexuality, sex work and trafficking, feminist politics, and human rights.

,

If it is a small world after all, how do forces of globalization shape and redefine both men’s and women’s positions as as workers and political subjects? And, if power swirls everywhere, how are transnational power dynamics reinscribed in gendered bodies? How is the body represented in discussions of the political economy of globalization? These questions will frame this course by highlighting how gender and power coalesce to impact the lives of individuals in various spaces including workplaces, the home, religious institutions, refugee camps, the government, and civil society, and human rights organizations. We will use specific sociological and anthropological case studies, to look at how various regimes of power operate to constrain individuals as well as give them new spaces for agency.This course will enable us to think transnationally, historically, and dynamically, using gender as a lens through which to critique relations of power and the ways that power informs our everyday lives and identities. 

Fall 2017: WMST UN3915
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WMST 3915 001/02432 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
754 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Selina Makana 4 23/25

WMST W4303 Gender, Globalization, and Empire. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I).

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Study of the role of gender in economic structures and social processes comprising globalization and in political practices of contemporary U.S. empire. This seminar focuses on the ways in which transformations in global political and economic structures over the last few decades including recent political developments in the U.S. have been shaped by gender, race, sexuality, religion and social movements.

WMST W4305 Feminist Postcolonial Theory. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Critical Approaches and/or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Examines important concerns, concepts and methodological approaches of postcolonial theory, with a focus on feminist perspectives on and strategies for the decolonization of Eurocentric knowledge-formations and practices of Western colonialism. Topics for discussion and study include orientalism, colonialism, nationalism and gender, the politics of cultural representations, subjectivity and subalternity, history, religion, and contemporary global relations of domination.

WMST W4308 Sexuality and Science. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines scientific research on human sexuality, from early sexology through contemporary studies of biology and sexual orientation, surveys of sexual behavior, and the development and testing of Viagra. How does such research incorporate, reflect, and reshape cultural ideas about sexuality? How is it useful, and for whom?

WMST W4320 Queer Theories and Histories. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course will cover a range of (mostly U.S. and mostly 20th-Century) materials that thematize gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender experience and identity. We will study fiction and autobiographical texts, historical, psychoanalytic, and sociological materials, queer theory, and films, focusing on modes of representing sexuality and on the intersections between sexuality and race, ethnicity, class, gender, and nationality. We will also investigate connections between the history of LGBT activism and current events. Authors will include Foucault, Freud, Butler, Sedgwick, Anzaldua, Moraga, Smith. Students will present, and then write up, research projects of their own choosing.