Political Science

http://polisci.barnard.edu/

205 Lefrak 
212-854-8422
Department Administrator: Madeleine Lloyd-Davies

The Department of Political Science

Political Science explores questions about power: what it is, where it comes from, who exercises it, how it is used and legitimized. Concretely, political scientists study the processes, policies and institutions of different political systems as well as critical issues such as health care policy, civil rights, the origins of wars, the nature of democracy, the causes of authoritarianism, the meaning of justice, and the genesis of terrorism.

Mission

In accordance with the mission of Barnard College, the political science department aims to create a community of teachers and students committed to intellectual discovery, rigorous analysis, and independent thought. The department's courses emphasize reflection, discussion, deliberation and intensive interactions between faculty members and students. The Barnard political science department strives to help students think clearly and methodically about the questions and issues that make up political science, equip them with the intellectual and presentational skills necessary to understand and address practical political issues as well as prepare them for a wide range of careers in federal, state and local governments; law; business; international organizations; nonprofit associations and organizations; campaign management and polling; journalism; pre-collegiate education; electoral politics; research and university and college teaching.
The department recognizes four subfields of the discipline:

Political Theory: the study of the conceptual foundations of political systems and behavior.

  • Student learning outcome: after completing one or more courses in Political Theory students should have a familiarity with some of the key concepts, theories and debates that have defined thinking about politics over time.

American Government and Politics: the study of all aspects of the American political system, including its development, institutions, procedures, and actors.

  • Student learning outcome: after completing one or more courses in American Government and Politics students should understand the basic structure of the American political system and how some of its institutions, procedures, and actors function.

Comparative Politics: the study of the political systems of other countries and regions, including the use of comparisons across cases in order to gain a broader and deeper understanding of events, institutions, and processes.

  • Student learning outcome: after completing one or more courses in Comparative Politics students should have a familiarity with the political systems of other countries and regions, and be able to use comparisons across cases in order to gain a broader and deeper understanding of political events, institutions, and processes.

International Relations: the study of relations between countries and the dynamics and development of the international system.

  • Student learning outcome: after completing one or more courses in International Relations students should understand the key approaches to the study of the relations between countries and a familiarity with the basic dynamics and development of the international system.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the Barnard Political Science major, students should be able to:

  • Analyze, speak and write about the subject matter and major theories of at least three of the four subfields of political science;
  • Apply social scientific reasoning and theories to the analysis of a wide range of political issues and problems;
  • Generate and test hypotheses about political processes, relationships and institutions or engage in conceptual analysis and interpretation of political ideas, arguments, and phenomena;
  • Complete independent research projects in political science, particularly via the capstone senior project.

Five-Year Bachelors/Master of Arts Programs

Students interested in public careers should consider the five-year joint-degree programs at Columbia University's School of International & Public Affairs (SIPA).

  • The SIPA programs include the Graduate Program in Public Policy & Administration (MPA) and the Master of International Affairs Program (MIA). For information, please contact the Department Representative.

Chair: Xiaobo Lü  (Professor)
Professors: Alexander A. Cooley, Sheri E. Berman,  Kimberly J. Marten, Kimberley S. Johnson, Richard M. Pious (Adjunct), Paula A. Franzese (Visiting)
Associate Professors: Séverine Autesserre,  Ayten Gündoğdu (Department Representative)
Assistant Professors: Lisel Hintz (Term), Katherine Krimmel, Michael G. Miller, Eduardo Moncada, Michelle Smith, Claire Ullman (Adjunct)

Other Officers of the University Offering Courses in Political Science: Columbia Political Science Faculty

Requirements for the Major--students who were first-years in Fall 2015 or earlier

A total of nine courses are necessary to complete the Political Science major:

  • Three introductory lecture courses at the 1000-level or 3000-level from different subfields,
  • Three elective courses,
  • Three colloquia

Please use the Major Audit to plan your program and track your courses for the major.

The department recognizes four subfields of the discipline:

  • American Government and Politics: the study of all aspects of the American political system, including its development, institutions, procedures, and actors.
  • Comparative Politics: the study of the political systems of other countries and regions, including the use of comparisons across cases in order to gain a broader and deeper understanding of events, institutions, and processes.
  • International Relations: the study of relations between countries and the dynamics and development of the international system.
  • Political Theory: the study of the conceptual foundations of political systems and behavior.

The three colloquia must be taken with faculty at Barnard College. Many of the lecture courses may be taken with faculty at Columbia College, if these courses are cross-listed. Various study-abroad options and summer courses also may meet your specialized interests, but these require

  1. prior consultation with your major adviser, as well as
  2. prior approval by the Departmental Representative and
  3. subsequent approval by the Department Chair once you apply to transfer the credit to Barnard (use the Course Approval Request Form for steps 2 and 3).

Students interested in the Sciences Po–Barnard five-year joint-degree program are encouraged to meet with the Dean for Study-Abroad, also regarding the political science aspects of this BA/MA program. The requirements are at the end of this page.

Please use the Major Audit to plan your program and track your courses for the major.

Introductory-level Lecture Course Requirement (three lecture courses)

The political science department requires all students to take at least one introductory 1000- or 3000-level lecture course in three of the four subfields of political science (listed above).  These courses are designed to provide an introduction to the main subject matter and major theories of each subfield.

These courses also serve to familiarize students with the analytic approaches that political scientists use. After taking lecture courses in the relevant subfields, students are eligible to take the two required colloquium courses.

Advanced Placement Credit

A student granted Advanced Placement (AP) credit by the College in either American Politics or Comparative Politics with an exam score of 5 will have fulfilled the prerequisite for courses that require the prior completion of POLS UN1201 Introduction To American Government and Politics or POLS UN1501 Introduction to Comparative Politics, respectively. If the student wants to take the introductory American Politics or Comparative Politics course, she may do so, but she will forfeit her corresponding AP credit.

AP credit does not count toward the number of courses required for the major or minor, i.e. the student still needs to complete the nine courses for the major or the five for the minor.

Electives Requirement (three additional courses)

All political science courses emphasize social scientific reasoning and theory application. In addition, political science majors chose three electives (normally at the 3000- or 4000-level). These courses are designed to deepen and expand students’ knowledge base and encourage them to apply social scientific reasoning and theories to the analysis of a broad range of political issues and problems.

What fulfills the Three-Course Electives requirement

  1. All courses offered at Barnard or Columbia in political science listed in the Barnard Course Catalogue, including introductory lecture courses and colloquia, satisfy elective course requirements. Courses listed in Columbia catalogues which are not listed in the Barnard catalogue require approval by Barnard Department Representative, before counting toward the major or concentration (use the Course Approval Request Form).
  2. The Independent Study Option POLS BC3799 Independent Study. Students who wish to do an independent study project (ISP) should first speak to a political science faculty member willing to sponsor it. Credit is given for an academic research paper written in conjunction with an internship, but no academic credit is given for an internship or job experience per sé. The student must then apply to the Committee on Programs and Academic Standing (CPAS), which must approve all Independent Study requests. Once the request is granted, the Registrar creates a section and assigns a call number, and the student is notified of the call number so she can enter the course on her program. (Each instructor has a separate section and call number. Each instructor is limited to sponsoring one independent study per semester.) Students will consult with the sponsoring instructor as to workload and points of credit for the independent study course.  Independent study counts as a course for the purpose of the nine-course requirement, provided the project is approved for 3 or 4 points. A project taken for 1 or 2 points does not count as a course toward the major, the minor, or the concentration requirement.
  3. With pre-approval, first from the individual Major Advisor and then from the Department Representative, a student may substitute a course in another department for one of the three elective courses. This course cannot be an introductory course and it must have significant political science content (use the Course Approval Request Form). Approval after the fact will not be granted.
  4. Six of the nine courses for the major must be taken from courses listed in the political science section of the Barnard Course Catalogue. Within the three-course limit of courses taken elsewhere, the following caps traditionally apply: three transfer courses; two Reid Hall courses; two study-abroad courses; one summer session course. On rare occasions the Department Representative may grant an exception (use the Course Approval Request Form).

What does not fulfill the Three-Course Electives requirements

The Independent Study Option POLS BC3799 Independent Study does not satisfy the course requirement if the project is for 1 or 2 points.

College-granted AP credit for American Politics or Comparative Politics does not count as major course credit. (See Advanced Placement Credit, above.)

Courses taken at other colleges, in summer sessions, or abroad, which are not equivalent in rigor and workload to Barnard courses, as determined by the Department Representative, in consultation with other faculty of the department, will not count toward the major or minor requirements.

Colloquium Requirement (three one-semester courses)

Although all political science courses teach students to generate and test hypotheses about political processes, relationships and institutions and/or engage in conceptual analysis and interpretation of political ideas, arguments and phenomena, students are encouraged to do this at a higher level in their three required colloquia. These colloquia feature intensive, small group discussions and a major research paper, and provide students with an opportunity to work more independently than they probably have in previous courses.

The colloquium format involves weekly discussion of readings, and development of research skills through completion of a 25- to 30-page research paper, constituting the major piece of written work for the course. Admission is limited to sixteen students who are assigned by the department, not by individual instructors. Students must have completed one lecture course in the relevant subfield before enrolling in the colloquium (or must receive special permission from the instructor for that requirement to be waived). It is recommended but not required that the three required colloquia be taken with different Barnard instructors and selected from the asterisked colloquium offerings listed in the Barnard course catalogue. Columbia seminars do not fulfill this requirement.

If you plan on spending part or all of junior year abroad

Plan to take a colloquium during the second semester of your sophomore year. This means applying for the colloquium during the first semester of your sophomore year. Indicate on your colloquium application that you plan to be abroad one or both semesters during junior year.

If you plan to be away for the entire junior year, you must plan on taking a colloquium in your sophomore year. Please be sure to e-mail both your academic major advisor and the department administrator by the middle of March of your year abroad, in order to apply for a colloquium if you need to take one in the fall of your senior year.

Senior Projects and the Third Colloquium

Students must designate one of the three colloquia to fulfill the Senior Project. Students must indicate their intention to take a colloquium for the Senior Project colloquium on their application and work completed in this colloquium will be considered for Senior Project Distinction. The designated Senior Project colloquium cannot be changed after the Add/Drop deadline of the semester in which the colloquium is being offered.

All students will display a summary poster of their designated Senior Research Paper written for the third colloquium at the Political Science Majors Senior Event at the end of the Spring semester. Early graduates will be required to submit their poster to the Department prior to graduating. Posters can be displayed in absentia for those students who graduate early.

Requirements for the Combined Major

A student doing a combined major in Human Rights and Political Science must complete the full nine-course requirements for the Political Science major in addition to Human Rights courses. Both departments must agree on the potential departmental honors nomination.

A student doing a combined major in Jewish Studies and Political Science must complete the full nine-course requirements for the Political Science major in addition to Jewish Studies courses. Both departments must agree on the senior requirement grade and the potential departmental honors nomination.

A student doing a combined major in Women's Studies and Political Science must complete the full nine-course requirements for the Political Science major in addition to Women's Studies courses. She must consult both thesis advisors (=sponsors) on a regular basis throughout the colloquium and the completed thesis must integrate the two fields of inquiry. Both departments must agree on the senior requirement grade and the potential departmental honors nomination.

Any other combined major (for example, Art History-Political Science), or a special major, requires a petition to the Committee on Programs and Academic Standing (CPAS) and the approval of the Chairs of the sponsoring departments. (For Political Science, obtain the approval of the Department Representative.) Obtain forms and instructions from the Class Dean in the Dean of Studies Office. The student will be required to take a minimum of seven political science courses of at least three points each, including two lecture courses and three colloquia, to be selected in consultation with the Departmental Representative. The student is expected to take a third colloquium. She must consult both essay advisors (=sponsors) on a regular basis throughout the colloquium, assuring integration of the two fields of inquiry. Both departments must agree on the senior requirement grade and the potential departmental honors nomination.

Requirements for the Double Major with One Integrating Senior Essay

The student is required to complete the coursework for each major with no overlapping courses, but will undertake only one integrating senior requirement project with two thesis advisors (=sponsors), one from each of the two departments. The student must consult both advisors on a regular basis throughout the colloquium and the completed thesis must integrate the two fields of inquiry. Both departments must agree on the senior requirement grade and the potential departmental honors nomination.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE SCIENCES PO – BARNARD BA/MA EXCHANGE PROGRAM

In order to complete the Sciences Po – Barnard five-year Bachelor/Master of Arts requirements, the Barnard political science major should:

  • Complete all her major requirements at Barnard, including two of three required colloquia;

  • Fulfill her senior thesis requirement by choosing one of the following two options:

Option 1:  Complete a third colloquium while at Barnard.

Option 2: When at Sciences Po, the student takes a personal one-semester tutorial with a Sciences Po professor assigned according to the student’s interest. The tutorial must focus on advice on bibliographical search, research strategy, methodological issues, and writing on a given topic, in order to help the student write a research paper equivalent to a Barnard senior project in political science. The research paper should meet the following criteria:

  • It should be a minimum of 30-40 pages double-spaced;

  • It should be a coherent piece of analytical writing;

  • It should embody the answer to some question about the operation of certain aspects of political or governmental institutions or processes, broadly conceived;

  • It should be based on original research conducted by the student;

  • It should be theoretically informed. It should be a social science paper, and not a policy one;

  • The student should use, at least, secondary sources.

Please use the Major Audit to track your Barnard courses for the major.

Requirements for the Minor

A total of five courses are necessary to complete a minor. Four of these courses must be taken from courses listed in the Political Science section of the Barnard Course Catalogue. Only one political science course taken in a summer session, study-abroad program, Reid Hall Program, or another undergraduate college may be used to satisfy the five-course requirement for the minor, with the approval of the Department Representative.

Faculty and Staff members designated to answer questions:

Xiaobo Lu, Professor & Department Representative, 207 Lefrak (x4-4440 or 4-7912),  xlu@barnard.edu

Madeleine Lloyd-Davies, Department Administrator, 205 Lefrak (x 4-8422), mlloydda@barnard.edu

Introductory Courses

Three introductory-level lecture courses, each from a different subfield, are required of all Barnard majors and concentrators. These courses are designed to provide an introduction to the main subject matter and major theories of each subfield. Any lecture course at the 1000-level that is listed in this section fulfills this requirement. In addition, selected lecture courses at the 3000-level may be substituted for a 1000-level course in the same subfield. A list of appropriate Barnard and Columbia 3000-level political science lecture courses is on-line.

The subfields of all Barnard courses are listed. These are:

  • Political Theory: the study of the conceptual foundations of political systems and behavior.
  • American Government and Politics: the study of all aspects of the American political system, including its development, institutions, procedures, and actors.
  • Comparative Politics: the study of the political systems of other countries and regions, including the use of comparisons across cases in order to gain a broader and deeper understanding of events, institutions, and processes.
  • International Relations: the study of relations between countries and the dynamics and development of the international system.

Advanced Placement Credit

A student granted Advanced Placement (AP) credit by the College in either American Politics or Comparative Politics with an exam score of 5 will have fulfilled the prerequisite for courses that require the prior completion of POLS BC 1201 or V 1501, respectively. If the student wants to take the introductory American Politics or Comparative Politics course, she may do so, but she will forfeit her corresponding AP credit.
AP credit does not count toward the number of courses required for the major or minor, i.e. the student still needs to complete the nine courses for the major or the five for the minor.

Introductory Courses

POLS UN1101 Political Theory I. 4 points.

What is the relationship between law and justice? Are capacities of political judgment shared by the many or reserved for the few? What does human equality consist of and what are its implications? Can individual freedom be reconciled with the demands of political community? What are the origins and effects of persistent gender inequalities? These are some of the crucial questions that we will address in this introductory course in political theory. The course is divided into five thematic sections, each addressing an enduring political problem or issue and centered on a key text in the history of political thought: 1. Laws, Obligations, and the Question of Disobedience; Sophocles, Antigone; 2. Democratic Citizenship and the Capacities of Political Judgment; Plato, Republic; 3. Origins and Effects of (In)equality; John Locke, Second Treatise of Civil Government; 4. Paradoxes of Freedom; Jean Jacques Rousseau, On the Social Contract; 5. The Woman Question; John Stuart Mill, The Subjection of Women.

Fall 2017: POLS UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 1101 001/17587 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
301 Pupin Laboratories
Nadia Urbinati 4 103/152

POLS UN1201 Introduction To American Government and Politics. 4 points.

Lecture and discussion. Dynamics of political institutions and processes, chiefly of the national government. Emphasis on the actual exercise of political power by interest groups, elites, political parties, and public opinion.

Fall 2017: POLS UN1201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 1201 001/16294 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
417 International Affairs Bldg
Justin Phillips 4 360/400

POLS UN1501 Introduction to Comparative Politics. 4 points.

This course provides a broad overview of the comparative politics subfield by focusing on important substantive questions about the world today. The course is organized around four questions. First, why can only some people depend upon the state to enforce order? Second, how can we account for the differences between autocracies and democracies? Third, what different institutional forms does democratic government take? Finally, are some institutions more likely than others to produce desirable social outcomes such as accountability, redistribution, and political stability?

Spring 2018: POLS UN1501
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 1501 001/27000 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
Room TBA
4 140/140

POLS UN1601 Introduction to International Politics. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Lecture and discussion. The basic setting and dynamics of global politics, with emphasis on contemporary problems and processes.

Spring 2018: POLS UN1601
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 1601 001/15008 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
417 International Affairs Bldg
Robert Jervis 4 308/350
POLS 1601 002/05524 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Katelyn Jones 4 101/100

Lecture Courses

POLS BC3025 American Political Parties. 3 points.

Political parties have evoked widespread scorn in the U.S. since the founding era; and yet, they arose almost immediately and have endured for over two centuries. In this course, we will examine why parties formed despite the Founders’ disdain for them. (In 1789, Thomas Jefferson wrote, “If I could not go to heaven but with a party, I would not go at all.” In 1800, he won the presidency as a candidate of a major party.) We will dig into scholarly debates about what exactly parties are, what purpose they serve, and how and why they have changed over time as organizations, in the electorate, and in government.


Topics will include the presidential nomination process from the founding through the much-discussed 2016 primary election season, the life cycle of third parties, and the relationship between political parties and interest groups. Students will learn what is and is not unique about the current historical moment, and how history might shape our expectations of parties moving forward.


Throughout the course, we will pay particularly close attention to the roots of contemporary party polarization, and the implications of this phenomenon for representation and governance. In 1950, the American Political Science Association released a report criticizing the two major parties for excessive similarity; today, party polarization evokes widespread concern. Is there an ideal level of party difference? How much is too much? We will address these difficult questions, among others, in this broad survey of American political parties. 

POLS BC3030 Drawing Conclusions – Political Cartoons, Comix and the Uncensored Artistic Mind. 3 points.

This course examines the past, present and future of political cartooning, satire and protest art. The work presented will be chosen for its unique ability to demonstrate the inflammatory effect of humor, uncensored commentary and critical thinking on a society so often perplexed by artistic free expression and radicalized creative candor. 

POLS BC3200 American Political Development, 1789-1980. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: V 1201 or equivalent intro course in American Politics.

American Political Development (APD) is an emerging subfield within American Politics that focuses on the ways that political culture, ideology, governing structures (executives, legislatures, judiciaries, and subnational governments) and structures of political linkage (political parties and organized interests) shape the development of political conflict and public policy. Rejecting the fragmentation of the field of American Politics into narrow specialties, it links government, politics, policy, culture, and economics in a broad-gauged search for understanding.  (Cross-listed by the American Studies Program.)

POLS BC3254 First Amendment Values. 3 points.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or an equivalent. Not an introductory course. Not open to students who have taken the colloquium POLS BC3302. Enrollment limited to 25 students; L-course sign-up.

Examines the first amendment rights of speech, press, religion and assembly. In-depth analysis of landmark Supreme Court rulings provides the basis for exploring theoretical antecedents as well as contemporary applications of such doctrines as freedom of association, libel, symbolic speech, obscenity, hate speech, political speech, commercial speech, freedom of the press and religion. (Cross-listed by the American Studies Program.)

Spring 2018: POLS BC3254
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3254 001/01940 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Ll103 Diana Center
Paula Franzese 3 40/40

POLS BC3402 The Comparative Politics of Gender Inequality. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I).

Prerequisites: Not an introductory-level course. Not open to students who have taken the colloquium POLS BC 3507. Enrollment limited to 20 students; L-course sign-up through eBear. Barnard syllabus.

Uses major analytical perspectives in comparative politics to understand the persistence of gender inequality in advanced industrial states. Topics include: political representation and participation; political economy and capitalism; the historical development of welfare states; electoral systems, electoral quotas; the role of supranational and international organizations; and social policy.

Fall 2017: POLS BC3402
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3402 001/04616 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
502 Diana Center
Claire Ullman 3 16/20

POLS BC3403 Psychology and Decision-Making in Foreigh Policy. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Why do leaders make the decisions they do? International Relations scholars are increasingly recognizing the importance of psychological approaches to understanding world affairs, particularly the crafting and implementation of foreign policy.  We examine humans’ cognitive biases and other dynamics that produce often surprising, suboptimal outcomes in international politics.  

POLS BC3521 Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. 3 points.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or the equivalent. Not an introductory-level course. Not open to students who have taken the colloquium POLS BC3326. Enrollment limited to 25 students; L-course sign-up through eBear. Barnard syllabus.

Explores seminal caselaw to inform contemporary civil rights and civil liberties jurisprudence and policy.  Specifically, the readings examine historical and contemporary first amendment values, including freedom of speech and the press, economic liberties, takings law, discrimination based on race, gender, class and sexual preference, affirmative action, the right to privacy, reproductive freedom, the right to die, criminal procedure and adjudication, the rights of the criminally accused post-9/11 and the death penalty. (Cross-listed by the American Studies and Human Rights Programs.)

Fall 2017: POLS BC3521
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3521 001/04891 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
323 Milbank Hall
Paula Franzese 3 53/60

POLS BC3601 International Law and the United Nations in Practice. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS UN1601 or HRTS UN3001 An equivalent course to POLS UN1601 or HRTS UN3001 may be used as a pre-requisite, with departmental permission.

Examines the development of international law and the United Nations, their evolution in the Twentieth Century, and their role in world affairs today. Concepts and principles are illustrated through their application to contemporary human rights and humanitarian challenges, and with respect to other threats to international peace and security.  The course consists primarily of presentation and discussion, drawing heavily on the practical application of theory to actual experiences and situations. For the Barnard Political Science major, this seminar counts as elective credit only. (Cross-listed by the Human Rights Program.)

Spring 2018: POLS BC3601
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3601 001/08331 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
501 Diana Center
Martin Flaherty 4 20/20

POLS GU4875 Russia and the West. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).
Enrollment limited to 40.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Exploration of Russia's ambiguous relationship with the Western world. Cultural, philosophical, and historical explanations will be examined alongside theories of domestic political economy and international relations, to gain an understanding of current events. Select cases from the Tsarist, Soviet, and recent periods will be compared and contrasted, to see if patterns emerge. This course counts as an introductory-level course in international relations.

Spring 2018: POLS GU4875
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4875 001/00352 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
409 Barnard Hall
Kimberly Marten 4 30/30

POLS UN3103 Great Political Thinkers in the Black Intellectual Tradition. 3 points.

Prerequisites: None.

In this course, we examine how the black intellectual tradition's best political thinkers grappled with a concrete and particular instance of a universal problematic of domination and submission, inclusion and exclusion, power and powerlessness, and the question of how subaltern groups can find liberation from their subalternity. Though many of the thinkers under consideration are significant as political actors, we understand their writings to provide a complex and contested theoretical backdrop for political action. We explore how black thinkers 1) criticize and American democracy corrupted by slavery 2) articulate the ideological functions of 'race,' 3) redefine race consciousness in terms of linked fate.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3103
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3103 001/00340 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
207 Milbank Hall
Michelle Smith 3 21/30

POLS UN3213 American Urban Politics. 3 points.

This course examines the pattern of political development in urban America, as the country's population has grown in urbanized locations. It explores the process by which cities and suburbs are governed, how immigrants and migrants are incorporated, and how people of different races and ethnicities interact in urbanized settings as well as the institutional relations of cities and suburbs with other jurisdictions of government. The course focuses both on the historical as well the theoretical understandings of politics in urban areas.

Spring 2018: POLS UN3213
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3213 001/14027 M W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
602 Hamilton Hall
Carlos Vargas-Ramos 3 70/70

POLS UN3560 Politics of Urban Development in Latin America. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

What shapes the ways cities develop politically and socioeconomically? Why do some cities become seeming "models" of urban governance whereas others struggle with perpetual corruption, inequality, and crime and violence? How do formal and informal political and social institutions interact to shape patterns of urban development? How do relations between cities and other levels of the state, including regional and national governments, impact local democracy and developemnt? Are impoverished urban peripheries fertile grounds for political revolution? These are some of the questions that we will tackle in this course through a focus on urban politics and development in Latin America.  Perceptions among both scholars and policymakers regarding Latin America's urbanization are polarized. Some see the region's development including innovative forms of governance, like participatory budgeting, social urbanism through participatory planning, and communiy policing. Others view the swift and unprecedented pace of clientelism, and violence. Our task this semester is to mediate between these two perspectives as we explore and analyze urban politics and development in the region.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3560
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3560 001/04581 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
409 Barnard Hall
Eduardo Moncada 3 25/30

POLS UN3565 Drugs and Politics in the Americas. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

One of the major challenges for democracy in much of the developing world is the complex links between illegal drug markets and politics. These linkages span multiple levels, from the microdynamics of everyday politics in territories controlled by drug gangs to interdependence between drug trafficking and civil conflict to the contentious politics of global drug regimes. This course will examine these dynamics theoretically and empirically with a focus on the Western Hemisphere (North, Central, and Sough America as well as the Caribbean).

Spring 2018: POLS UN3565
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3565 001/00575 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
203 Diana Center
Eduardo Moncada 3 45/45

POLS UN3604 War, Peace, and International Interventions in Africa. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 110.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: at least sophomore standing, except in consultation with the instructor.

This course analyzes the causes of violence in civil wars. It examines the debates around emergency aid, peacekeeping and peacebuilding. In addition, it focuses on recent conflict situations in Africa -- especially Congo, Sudan, and Rwanda -- as a background against which to understand the distinct dynamics of violence, peace, and international interventions in civil conflicts. (Cross-listed by the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race.)

POLS V3222 Political Science Research Methods. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., Lab Required

Prerequisites: At least sophomore standing recommended. No prior experience with statistics is assumed.
Corequisites: POLS V 3223 Computer Lab: TBD (50 minutes per week). Enrollment limited to 40 students: "L" sign-up through eBear. Not an introductory-level course. Barnard syllabus.

The course introduces students to the systematic study of political phenomena. Students will learn how to develop research questions and executable research designs. Then, taking an applied approach, students learn basic statistical and case study techniques for evaluating evidence and making empirical claims. No prior experience with statistics is assumed.

POLS V3240 Race, Law, and American Politics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: POLS V 1201 or equivalent

This class focuses on the broader implications of race as it relates to constitutional law, resistance movements and political economy. This class examines the dynamic relationship between race, law and American politics as a lens by which to interrogate core concepts in legal, social and political decision-making. Enrollment limited to 40 students.

POLS V3313 American Urban Politics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Patterns of government and politics in America's large cities and suburbs: the urban socioeconomic environment; the influence of party leaders, local officials, social and economic notables, and racial, ethnic, and other interest groups; mass media, the general public, and the state and federal governments; and the impact of urban governments on ghetto and other urban conditions. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 3213.

POLS V3615 Globalization and International Politics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Explores how globalization affects the structures and functions of the international economy, state sovereignty, international security, and international civil society. Emphasis on problems of international governance, legitimacy and accountability, and the evolving organizational processes that characterize contemporary international politics.

POLS V3620 Introduction to Contemporary Chinese Politics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Introduction to some basic aspects and major events in Chinese political life under the communists since 1949, focusing on the post-Mao reform period since 1978. Examination of economic and political development in China in a broader context of global transition from authoritarianism and state socialism.

POLS W4205 Politics, Crime and Punishment. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 Intro to American Politics or the equivalent.

This course investigates the politics of crime and the criminal justice system. We investigate the origins of the politics of law and order from the mid-twentieth century to today, against a broader backdrop of partisan competition, urban de-industrialization, and socio-cultural tensions. Particular attention is paid to the role of politicians and political institutions such as the Congress, the Judiciary and federal, state and local bureaucracies such as local police in conceptualizing the need for a "war on crime;" and developing the political and institutional mechanisms for carrying out this war. The course reviews the current political, institutional and societal developments arising from the war on crime and current debates amongst politicians and policymakers. Issues such as sentencing disparities; racial differences in death penalty cases; New York City's "stop and frisk" policy; and, felon disenfranchisement, are among some of the topics that will be covered in this course. Students will analyze a mix of social science research, legal cases, and policy analyses, as a means of understanding the political development of the American criminal justice. Readings and in-class discussions will be supplemented by guest speakers drawn from organizations involved in the crime/criminal justice system.

POLS W4316 The American Presidency. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or any course that qualifies for the the introductory-level American Politics course. Barnard syllabus. \n \n "L" sign-up through eBear.

Growth of presidential power, creation and use of the institutionalized presidency, presidential-congressional and presidential-bureaucratic relationships, and the presidency and the national security apparatus. (Cross-listed by the American Studies Program.)

POLS W4321 The Constitutional Law of Presidential-Congressional Relations. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines the constitutional issues involved in presidential-congressional relations, including assertions of presidential emergency powers, control of the administrative agencies, congressional investigations and the independent counsel, and the constitutional law of presidential diplomatic and war powers.

POLS W4435 Political Corruption and Governance. 3 points.

Prerequisites: POLS V1501 or its equivalent. Additional courses in comparative politics are recommended. Open to undergraduate students with at least sophomore standing and graduate students.

Survey of the social science discourse on political corruption in the contemporary world and its relationship to political and economic development. Exploration of questions concerning political corruption, its causes, consequences, patterns, and effective mechanisms to reduce, contain, and eliminate corruption. Barnard syllabus.

POLS W4820 International Relations of a Post-Western World. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS 1601 or an equivalent introductory course in international politics; an introductory course in Economics or international finance is recommended for background, but not required.

Examines emerging challenges to the Western-built order of international politics, including emerging powers and the Bretton Woods economic institutions, the reslience of the US-led security system, and the contestation of Western values issues such as human rights and democracy promotion.  Focus on Eurasia, Middle East, Africa and Southeast Asia.

Colloquia

POLS BC3055 * Colloquium on Political Violence and Terrorism. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS V1501 or POLS V1601 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

What causes political violence and terrorism? How should we define "terrorism"--is it true, as the old saw goes, that one man’s terrorist is another man’s freedom fighter? What is the role of religious belief, as opposed to more immediate political goals, in fomenting terrorist action? Are al Qaeda and those linked to it different from terrorists we’ve seen in various places around the world in the past, or does all terrorism and political violence stem from the same variety of goals and purposes? Can governments take effective action to prevent or counter terrorism, or are we all doomed to live in insecurity? What is the proper balance between protection against terrorism and protection of civil liberties? This course examines these questions through weekly assigned readings, analysis and discussion.

Spring 2018: POLS BC3055
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3055 001/05523 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Kimberly Marten 4 11/16

POLS BC3101 * Colloquium on Black Political Thought. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS W1013 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

Advanced political theory colloquium treats black political thought as concerned with the universal problem of domination. Examines how black thinkers relate democracy, slavery and race; redefine race consciousness as linked fate; articulate new social theories to suggest new "meanings" for race; redefine the political to address social and aesthetic concerns.

POLS BC3102 * Colloquium on Race and Modern Political Thought. 4 points.

Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Prerequisites: POLS 1013 or the equivalent.

Race and Modern Political Thought is a Political Theory colloquium that explores how the concept of race became available to modern thought as a legitimate conceptualization of human being and difference and to political thought as an idea useful to structuring political communities.  Is race best understood in ideological terms, i.e., as a viewpoint shared by philosophers and lay-persons alike about difference that usefully reflected the needs and aspirations of slaveholders and colonialists?  Or is race instead an artifact of modern forms of reasoning?  Or should we ignore questions of origin and simply take seriously the notion that the only practical—ethically correct or politically progressive—approach to theorizing race is to attend critically to the organization of racial power?   What kind of idea is race?

Fall 2017: POLS BC3102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3102 001/06291 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
302 Milbank Hall
Michelle Smith 4 21

POLS BC3118 * Colloquium on Problems in International Security. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS V1501 or POLS V1601 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

Examination of causes and consequences of major current problems in international security. Topics include state power dynamics and the rise of China, nuclear deterrence and proliferation, military intervention and R2P, ethnic nationalism and sectarianism, state failure and warlordism, transnational terrorism.

Fall 2017: POLS BC3118
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3118 001/04040 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
227 Milbank Hall
0. FACULTY 4 8

POLS BC3300 * Colloquium on Political Participation and Democracy. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS BC1001 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Examination of the role of citizen participation in the development of American democracy. Topics include movements of women, workers, racial minorities and students; community organizing; voting, parties, and electoral laws; and contemporary anti-corporate movements. Syllabus.

POLS BC3304 * Colloquium on Politics and Policy-Making in American Federalism. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

Examines increasingly complex relationships existing amongst all levels of American government and theoretical and practical challenges these relationships present for policy-makers and citizens. Themes include which levels of government ought to be doing what, the role of exit and voice, and what it means to produce coherent public policy.

POLS BC3306 *Colloquium on Politics of Judicial Interpretation. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS 1201 Intro to American politics or an equivalent American Politics course. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Focusing on the development of constiutional doctrine across time, we will consider the growth of Supreme Court authority over constitutional questions (and challenges to that authority), the Court's relation to the other federal branches, and the relationship between constitutional change and social movements

POLS BC3307 *Colloquium on Racial Violence. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS 1201 Intro to American Politics or an equivalent American Politics course. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students.

This colloquium examines two particular episodes of racial violence, each of which situates the political differently: lynchings and prisons. The goal is to not only explore how to bring the state back in but also examine the differences, similarities and points of intersections across disciplines.

POLS BC3327 * Colloquium on Content of American Politics. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS BC1001 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Readings, discussions, and research on contemporary issues in American politics. Specific topics vary each semester, but have included the politics of race, the consequences of federalism, and the politics of the 1960s and its impact on contemporary politics. Syllabus.

POLS BC3328 * Colloquium on Politics of Urban Development. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS W 1201 (Introduction to American Government and Politics), POLS V 3313 (American Urban Politics), or permission from the instructor. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Explores the development policies that American cities are pursuing and the political, economic, and social contexts in which they pursue them.  Emphasis will be placed on developing both a theoretical and practical understanding of the challenges cities face as they seek economic prosperity.

POLS BC3329 * Colloquium on Harlem in Theory. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Harlem in Theory is an advanced political theory colloquium.  Its focus is both thematic and methodological.  Joining a two-thousand year tradition of doing philosophy in and for the city, we theorize Harlem as urbs and civitas (place and socio-political association) and bring Harlem to bear on philosophy.  We explore the political theorist's craft by engaging different theoretical approaches and methodologies used by political, social and critical theorists.  Our readings include political philosophy, critical frameworks for interpretation and historical, social scientific and literary works about Harlem - supplemented by film, music and of course periodic trips to various Harlem venues. General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC).

Spring 2018: POLS BC3329
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3329 001/09992 W 9:00am - 10:50am
Room TBA
Michelle Smith 4 6/16

POLS BC3330 Women in American Politics. 4 points.

Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Prerequisites: V 1201 or equivalent

A well-functioning democracy should certainly reflect the intent of its citizens, but it is worthwhile to consider whether this goal is achievable when the legislative assembly does not take on the characteristics of the population. In Congress, membership is comprised of fewer than 20% of women. Women constitute a somewhat greater proportion of the various state assemblies, but still not at levels that approach their share of the population. In this class, we will discuss the electoral experiences of women who run for office. We will also consider whether the women who are elected to public office behave differently, and what, if any, implications such a difference might have for public policy. We will also study how gender intersects with race and socio-economics in American political life. This course will introduce students to the concepts, major themes, and debates in the study of gender in American politics. Students who complete the class will learn how to: 1. Identify the key concepts, trends, and debates in the empirical study of women in American politics. 2. Draw linkages between theoretical political science and practical politics in describing how gender affects political outcomes. 3. Critically engage media coverage of women in politics. 4. Assess the theoretical and/or empirical quality of academic arguments about women in politics. 5. Use empirical evidence to present an effective argument, both written and verbal. 6. Produce a high-quality, original research paper that contributes to our understanding of gender in American political life.

Fall 2017: POLS BC3330
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3330 001/02400 W 11:00am - 12:50pm
407 Barnard Hall
0. FACULTY 4 14

POLS BC3331 * Colloquium on American Political Decisionmaking. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

Readings on decisionmaking, policy analysis, and the political setting of the administrative process. Students will simulate an ad hoc Cabinet Committee assigned to prepare a presidential program to deal with aspects of the foreign aid program involving hunger and malnutrition. (Cross-listed by the American Studies Program and by the Athena Center for Leadership Studies.)

POLS BC3332 * Colloquium on Exploring Political Leadership in the U.S.. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

Exploration of the effect of political leadership on political outcomes in the United States, with special attention to how individual characteristics, like personality, political style, ideology, gender, race and class, interact with the political environment in shaping political outcomes. (Cross-listed by the American Studies Program and by the Athena Center for Leadership Studies.)

POLS BC3334 *Colloquium on American Elections and Campaigns. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS V 1201 or equivalent American Politics course. POLS V 3222 or equivalent Research Methods course is recommended. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students.

The purpose of this course is to examine how political science can inform the real-world campaign environment, improving our understanding of strategy and outcomes in American elections.

Fall 2017: POLS BC3334
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3334 001/08666 M 11:00am - 12:50pm
407 Barnard Hall
0. FACULTY 4 12

POLS BC3337 *Colloquium on Election Reform. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS 1201 or an equivalent intro-level course in American Politics.

The purpose of this course is to examine problems in American democracy, and to critically evaluate proposals for reform.  We will examine the manner in which political science has engaged "real-world" problems in election systems and administration, campaign finance, and fraud.

POLS BC3410 *Colloquium on Human Rights in a Diverse World. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS V1013 or W3001 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

Exploration of the nature of human rights and questions of their validity and relevance, protection and redefinition, in this world of cultural diversity and diversity of national interests. (Cross-listed by the Human Rights Program.)

POLS BC3411 *Colloquium on Building Peace. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS 1601 (Intro to International Politics) or equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students.

How can we build peace in the aftermath of extensive violence? How can international actors help in this process? This colloquium focuses on international peacemaking, peacekeeping, and peacebuilding efforts in recent conflicts. It covers general concepts, theories, and debates, as well as specific cases of peacebuilding successes and failures. Cross-listed with Human Rights.

POLS BC3417 *Colloquium on Sovereignty and its Challenges. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS 1601 or equivalent Introduction to International Relations course. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students.

States are often assumed to maintain control over their sovereign affairs, yet in our contemporary era a variety of external actors regularly violate state sovereignty, pressure governments or challenge their domestic policy autonomy.  This course explores how the traditional political, economic and security functions of states are being undermined and reconfigured.

Fall 2017: POLS BC3417
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3417 001/01122 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
202 Milbank Hall
0. FACULTY 4 9

POLS BC3425 * Colloquium on the Politics of Development in East Asia. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS V1501, V1601 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Designed to inform students about the politics of development in one of the world’s most rapidly growing regions—East Asia (Japan, China, Korea, and Taiwan), focusing on the role of the state in economic development. Syllabus.

POLS BC3500 *Colloquium on Political Economy of Corruption and Its Control. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS V1501 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

Comparative political economy course which addresses some important questions concerning corruption and its control: the concept, causes, patterns, consequences, and control of corruption. Introduces students to and engages them in several key social science debates on the causes and effects of political corruption.

Fall 2017: POLS BC3500
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3500 001/03576 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
102 Sulzberger Annex
Xiaobo Lu 4 10

POLS BC3501 Urban Violence In Comparative Perspective. 4 points.

Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Prerequisites: V 1501 or equivalent

One of the key contemporary challenges for democracy and development across both the developing and developed worlds is urban violence. From urban gangs to paramilitaries to vigilantes to citizen defense committees, the city is increasing a key setting for a range of armed actors that engage in equally diverse forms of criminality and the exercise of coercive force. Major cities throughout the world thus lead two lives: as control and command centers in a globalized (and urbanized) economy, and as the stages where the monopoly over the legitimate use of violence that Max Weber identified as a defining attribute of the state is contested on a daily basis. This course has two overarching objectives. The first objective is to examine and critically assess existing theories of the drivers, functions, and consequences of urban crime and violence.  The second objective is to situate existing research within a broader range of classic and emerging political science research on state building, institutions, democracy,  development, and conflict. The methodological emphasis of the course is comparative analysis, and therefore empirical material will largely draw on analyses of crime and violence in Latin America and Africa, and the United States. This course will introduce students to the key theories, debates, and empirical studies of urban crime and violence. Students who successfully complete the class will: 1.      Acquire a broad knowledge of the theories and concepts used to analyze urban crime and violence. 2.      Develop a theoretically informed and empirically grounded understanding of both historical and contemporary trends in crime and violence in major cities across Latin America, Africa, and the United States. 3.      Draw linkages between news coverage of urban crime and violence and political science theories on a range of broader issues regarding state building, institutions, democracy, and development. 4.      Use existing theories to analyze, assess, and present empirical data, both written and verbal.   5.      Produce a major, original research paper that advances existing knowledge of the origins, dynamics, and/or consequences of urban crime and violence.

Fall 2017: POLS BC3501
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3501 001/06187 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
102 Sulzberger Annex
Eduardo Moncada 4 16

POLS BC3504 * Colloquium on Social Movements across Time and Space. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS V1501 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

Examines the origins, trajectories, and effects of social movements, from 18th century Britain to 19th century Iran to late 20th century Argentina, China, and the United States. Focuses on social movements’ relation to political parties, the state, and transnational forces and asks whether social movements promote or undermine democratization.

POLS BC3505 * Colloquium on Making Democracy Work. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS V1501 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

Examination of democratic consolidation and promotion. What makes democracy work and what, if anything, can outside actors do to help this process along? Topics include the theoretical literature on democratic consolidation, historical cases of intervention, debates about America’s role in promoting democracy, and examination of some of the research on democracy promotion. (Cross-listed by the Europen Studies and Human Rights Programs.)

Spring 2018: POLS BC3505
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3505 001/00522 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Sheri Berman 4 13/16

POLS BC3507 *Colloquium on Gender, Politics, and Markets. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS V1501 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

Considers why men more than women control political and economic resources in advanced industrial states of the world.  Examines how labor markets, welfare states, and political institutions have a different impact on women than men.  Evaluates attempts at increasing gender equality in political representation, labor market participation, and household work.  *Please note, students who have already taken BC 3402 The Compative Politics of Gender Inequality may not register for this colloquium.* (Cross-listed by the Womens Studies Program.)

POLS BC3540 *Colloquium on Constructing States, Nations, and Democracy. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS V1501 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students.

The course will examine the development of, and relationship among, the three constituent features of the modern political world: states, nations and democracy. The course will analyze both historical and contemporary cases, tracing how causal processes unfold over time and space and what past conditions and experiences lie behind today's political dynamics and problems.

Fall 2017: POLS BC3540
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3540 001/04660 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
405 Barnard Hall
Sheri Berman 4 18/16

POLS BC3611 Colloquium on Unconventional Approaches to International Relations. 4 points.

Prerequisites: (POLS UN 1601)

This class will examine modern issues in international relations (e.g., drones, global financial crises, cyber warfare, international terrorism) by drawing from unconventional theories of international relations (including feminist, critical, postcolonial, and geopolitical approaches). To begin, we will briefly review “old,” or conventional, approaches to international relations that you likely learned about in your Intro to IR class—realism, liberalism, constructivism, etc. We will also consider how these approaches do and/or do not help us make sense of the contemporary, global political landscape. From there, we will move on to explore contemporary challenges and problems in IR. As we analyze these new issues, we will review unconventional approaches to international relations and use new, or unconventional, IR lenses to shed light on these problems.

Spring 2018: POLS BC3611
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3611 001/05144 W 9:00am - 10:50am
212d Lewisohn Hall
Katelyn Jones 4 12/16

POLS BC3810 *Colloquium on Aid, Politics & Violence in Africa. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS V1601 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

Explores the concepts, theoretical traditions and debates around development and humanitarian aid, focusing on the relationships between aid, politics, and violence. It looks at the political and military impacts of aid, the linkage between humanitarian aid and conflict resolution, and aid's contribution to perpetuating subtle forms of domination. (Cross-listed by the Africana Studies and the Human Rights Programs.)

POLS BC3812 * Colloquium on State Failure, Warlords, and Pirates. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS V1501 or POLS V1601 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

What are sovereign states, why do they fail, does their failure matter, and can the international community help? This course examines these questions using social science theories and historical case studies. It focuses on the political economy and security consequences of two current forms of state failure: warlordism and piracy.

POLS BC3800 * Colloquium on International Political Economy. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS V1601 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Not open to students who have taken POLS V3633. Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Survey of the major theories and issues that inform the study of international political economy. Topics include: hegemony and stability, international cooperation, economy and security, international trade, money and finance, North-South relations, regional integration, and globalization. Syllabus.

POLS BC3801 Politics of Economic Development In the World. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).
Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Prerequisites: V 1501 or equivalent

Description: The semester-long course aims to study political and social factors behind economic development and exam empirical cases of the success and failure in economic growth in order to understand the key features of the development processes. In the last two centuries, some countries successfully achieved economic growth and development, while other failed to do so. Even in the post-WWII period, the world has witnessed the rise and decline of economies around the world. Why do nations succeed or fail in economic development? How do political institutions affect economic outcomes? What are the ways in which state and market interact and influence each other? Can democracy be considered a cause of development, an outgrowth of development, or neither and to which extent? How do external factors such as foreign aid encourage or discourage development? We will try to examine these questions by taking a historical-institutional and comparative approach and take a critical look at the role of political and other institutions by applying theoretical guidelines and empirical cases. We will explore competing explanations for the successes and failures of economic development in the world. Objective:1. Understand some important concepts and theories within the fields of comparative politics and political economy. To explore the interconnections between politics, economy, and society in the context of development policy and practice.2. Develop basic analytic skills to explore various factors that shape political, economic, and social development and underdevelopment in the world;3. Understand some country specific political economy processes and how these processes prove or disprove certain theories and policies.

Spring 2018: POLS BC3801
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3801 001/04651 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
502 Diana Center
Xiaobo Lu 4 14/16

Cross-Listed Courses

POLS UN1201 Introduction To American Government and Politics. 4 points.

Lecture and discussion. Dynamics of political institutions and processes, chiefly of the national government. Emphasis on the actual exercise of political power by interest groups, elites, political parties, and public opinion.

Fall 2017: POLS UN1201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 1201 001/16294 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
417 International Affairs Bldg
Justin Phillips 4 360/400

POLS UN1501 Introduction to Comparative Politics. 4 points.

This course provides a broad overview of the comparative politics subfield by focusing on important substantive questions about the world today. The course is organized around four questions. First, why can only some people depend upon the state to enforce order? Second, how can we account for the differences between autocracies and democracies? Third, what different institutional forms does democratic government take? Finally, are some institutions more likely than others to produce desirable social outcomes such as accountability, redistribution, and political stability?

Spring 2018: POLS UN1501
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 1501 001/27000 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
Room TBA
4 140/140

POLS UN1601 Introduction to International Politics. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Lecture and discussion. The basic setting and dynamics of global politics, with emphasis on contemporary problems and processes.

Spring 2018: POLS UN1601
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 1601 001/15008 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
417 International Affairs Bldg
Robert Jervis 4 308/350
POLS 1601 002/05524 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Katelyn Jones 4 101/100

POLS UN3100 Justice. 3 points.

An inquiry into the nature and implications of justice, including examinations of selected cases and issues such as Roe v. Wade, the O.J. Simpson case, the Pinochet case, affirmative action, recent tobacco litigation, and the international distribution of income and wealth.

POLS W3120 Democratic Theory. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

    Focuses on the theory and practice of democracy, from the examination of its classic and modern foundations to the analysis of its transformations in advanced industrial societies facing class, gender, race, and regional differences.

POLS W3125 Citizenship and Exclusion. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Citizenship has always been a battleground in struggles for inclusion and exclusion. This course aims to familiarize students with contemporary theories of citizenship from the lens of boundaries. What kind of 'good' is citizenship, and why is it denied to some? How do politically, socially or culturally marginalized groups use the discourse of citizenship to claim equal participation and recognition? How is access to citizenship status and rights regulated in contemporary democracies?

POLS W3165 Secularism and its Critics. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In recent years, the role of religion in the social and political life has increasingly become a subject of debate and controversy. As an important dimension of this debate, the idea of secularism and the main assumptions behind the secularization thesis have been questioned. Sharing the fate of many other dualities of modernity, the distinction between the secular and the sacred has also been challenged. The aim of this course is to study the main arguments behind secularism and secularization thesis and those behind its contemporary critics. In the first part of the course, we will explore the meaning of the secular and the main arguments behind secularism and the secularization thesis. The aim is to understand the role of the distinction between the secular and the sacred in the emergence of the idea of modern self, modern society and modern state. These debates would set the background for the analysis of contemporary debates on and critics of secularism, which will be the subject of the second part of the course. Readings include Kant, Marx, Weber, Blumenberg, Gauchet, Chadwick, Casanova, Keddie, Asad, Connolly, Taylor and Habermas.

POLS UN3170 Nationalism, Republicanism and Cosmopolitanism. 3 points.

Do we have obligations to our co-nationals that we do not owe to others? Might our loyalties or obligations to our fellow citizens be based on a commitment to shared political principles and common public life rather than national identity? Do we have basic duties that are owed equally to human beings everywhere, regardless of national or political affiliation? Do our commitments to co-nationals or compatriots conflict with those duties we might owe to others, and if so, to what extent? Is cosmopolitanism based on rationality and patriotism based on passion? This course will explore these questions from the perspectives of nationalism, republicanism and cosmopolitanism. We will consider historical works from Herder, Rousseau, Kant, Fichte, Mill, Mazzini and Renan; and more contemporary contributions from Berlin, Miller, Canovan, MacIntyre, Viroli, Sandel, Pettit, Habermas, Nussbaum, Appiah, and Pogge, among others.

POLS UN3190 Republicanism: Past and Present, or Plato to Pettit. 3 points.

The course is divided into two main parts. The first half examines features of classical republicanism and its developments from Greece and Rome up to the late eighteenth century. We will analyze the relationship between ethics and politics, the significance of the mixed constitution, the problem of political instability, the role of character in political action, and the relationship between virtuous citizens, good arms and good laws. The second half will be more issue-based, as we will examine the resurgence of republicanism in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, in part as a critique of liberal democracy. We will explore the efforts to define "republican" freedom, the relationship between equality and freedom (and the challenges posed by the market and inequality in resources), the relationship between republicanism and democracy, and the role and nature of civic virtue. The class will end with consideration of recent efforts on the part of some political theorists to redefine patriotism or loyalty to one's particular state in the modern world and to think about what republicanism might require on a global scale.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3190
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3190 001/29931 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
602 Northwest Corner
Jessica Kimpell 3 30/30

POLS W3208 State Politics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is intended to provide students with a detailed understanding of politics in the American states.  The topics covered are divided into four broad sections.  The first explores the role of the states in America's federal system of government.  Attention is given to the basic features of intergovernmental relations as well as the historic evolution of American federalism.  The second part of the course focuses on state-level political institutions.  The organization and processes associated with the legislative, executive, and judicial branches are discussed in depth.  The third part examines state elections, political parties, and interest groups.  Finally, the fourth section looks closely at various policy areas.  Budgeting, welfare, education, gay marriage, and environmental policy are each considered.

POLS UN3210 Judicial Politics. 3 points.

Law and courts as political institutions. Considers the role of the judiciary within the American system of government, power relations within the judicial hierarchy, politics of decision making on the Supreme Court, the politics of Supreme Court nominations, the role of interest groups and public opinion in shaping judicial doctrine, the social impact and legitimacy of courts, and the political history of the legal system.

POLS UN3220 Logic of Collective Choice. 3 points.

Much of politics is about combining individual preferences or actions into collective choices. We will make use of two theoretical approaches. Our primary approach will be social choice theory, which studies how we aggregate what individuals want into what the collective “wants.” The second approach, game theory, covers how we aggregate what individuals want into what the group gets, given that social, economic, and political outcomes usually depend on the interaction of individual choices. The aggregation of preferences or choices is usually governed by some set of institutional rules, formal or informal. Our main themes include the rationality of individual and group preferences, the underpinnings and implications of using majority rule, tradeoffs between aggregation methods, the fairness of group choice, the effects of institutional constraints on choice (e.g., agenda control), and the implications for democratic choice. Most of the course material is highly abstract, but these abstract issues turn up in many real-world problems, from bargaining between the branches of government to campus elections to judicial decisions on multi-member courts to the allocation of relief funds among victims of natural disasters to the scoring of Olympic events. The collective choice problem is one faced by society as a whole and by the smallest group alike.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3220
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3220 001/64661 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Ren Kraft Center
Jeffrey Lax 3 51/100

POLS W3230 Politics of American Policy Making. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This is a course on US federal level domestic policymaking. It is a study of the theoretical foundations of public policy research, of alternative models of public policy formation, their methodologies, and the relationship between the theory and practice of the policy sciences. We look at the institutional framework, procedures and interests that shape American public policy and examine American political institutional behavior (Congress, the bureaucracy, federalism…) and their role in producing public policy. The course considers policymaking, implementation, and policy analysis in the US political framework and focuses on substantive policy areas in a case study format. Attention will be paid to the budget process and specific policy areas including economic policy, employment policy, healthcare policy, antipoverty policy and environmental policy.

POLS W3245 Race and Ethnicity In American Politics. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course focuses on the historical and contemporary roles of various racial and ethnic groups; and the initiation, demands, leadership and organizational styles, orientation, benefits, and impact on the structures and outputs of governance in the United States.

POLS W3280 20th Century American Politics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In what sense was the New Deal/Fair Deal era led by Presidents Franklin Roosevelt and Harry Truman a ‘watershed’ and a ‘defining time’?  What policy choices were made, and which were not?  What has been their enduring impact?  Probing these issues at the crossroads of political science and history, the class aims both to explore key themes in American politics and to examine how approaches scholars use in each of the major subfields of political science—Comparative Politics, International Relations, Political Theory, and American Politics—can clarify important historical subjects.

POLS UN3285 Freedom of Speech and Press. 3 points.

Examines the constitutional right of freedom of speech and press in the United States. Examines, in depth, various areas of law, including extremist or seditious speech, obscenity, libel, fighting words, the public forum doctrine, and public access to the mass media. Follows the law school course model, with readings focused on actual judicial decisions.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3285
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3285 001/60905 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
501 Schermerhorn Hall
Lee Bollinger 3 153/189

POLS UN3290 Voting and American Politics. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Elections and public opinion; history of U.S. electoral politics; the problem of voter participation; partisanship and voting; accounting for voting decisions; explaining and forecasting election outcomes; elections and divided government; money and elections; electoral politics and representative democracy.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3290
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3290 001/64475 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
207 Mathematics Building
Robert Erikson 3 114/130

POLS W3322 The American Congress. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or the equivalent, or the instructor's permission.

Inquiry into the dynamics, organization, and policy-making processes of the American Congress. Particular emphasis on the relationship of legislators to constituents, lobbyists, bureaucrats, the president, and with one another. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 3222.

POLS W3503 Political Economy of African Development. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: there are no prerequisites, but introductory or intermediate macroeconomics is recommended.

This course is concerned with a few key questions: Why has Africa remained poor, volatile, and violent? Will Africa see future growth in incomes, stability, and freedom? What role has the West played in past failures, and what role (if any) should it play in the future? The course will cover the history, politics and economics of development in Africa, and dabbles in geography, sociology and anthropology as well. We start in prehistory and work our way up to the present day, with a focus on the 20th and 21st centuries. We interrogate the effects of Western intervention in Africa, from slavery and colonialism to modern-day foreign policy, aid, trade, peacekeeping, and democratization. We cover material ranging from qualitative case studies to formal theories of growth to statistical analyses to post-modern critiques. No prior exposure to any of these fields is required-the material is designed to be accessible to all, and technical material is presented in a relatively non-technical fashion.

POLS W3506 Comparative Party Politics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this course, we will study political parties and party systems in an attempt to understand why they exist and to what degree they promote or harm representative democracy.  Questions to be explored include the following: Why do some countries have only a few parties in their parliament/congress while other countries have many?  Why does the United States have only two major parties while countries with similar electoral systems—Great Britain, India, Canada—have more?  Why do major parties generally survive over decades and even centuries while new parties often collapse rapidly?  Why do professional politicians lead most political parties, and does this undermine democratic principles?

POLS W3585 Political Economy of Development. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Why are some countries rich and other countries poor?   This course examines the politics of economic reform and development.  More specifically, it explores debates about whether globalization, democracy, corruption, natural resources, state policies, social capital and foreign aid improve the quality of people’s lives in countries outside of the developed world.  The course includes extensive discussions about how to design research to help answer these questions. In addition, it applies these theories to a range of countries in four regions of the world.  By combining an emphasis on research design with applications of theoretical arguments to specific countries, the course aims to improve student’s analytic skills as well as make them familiar with the politics of economic reform in a broad range of countries.     There are no easy answers to these questions and we will have to work hard to determine which arguments are most convincing.    You will develop skills to evaluate theories of economic development and assess evidence with the goal of confirming or disconfirming arguments.   The most important requirements for the course are a willingness to keep an open mind, ask difficult questions, and search for answers.

POLS UN3630 Politics of International Economic Relations. 3 points.

This upper-level undergraduate course examines the intersection of politics and economics at primarily the international level. The course involves the careful reading and evaluation of the dominant theoretical and methodological approaches as currently used in the IPE field, as well as examination of prominent debates within the major IPE subject areas of trade, finance, development and globalization.  This class does not have an economics or a specific political science prerequisite, but assumes a general understanding of historical and contemporary political and economic events. As a 3000-level course, this class would not be an appropriate choice for students who have not already taken introductory courses in political science, including international relations and comparative politics.

Spring 2018: POLS UN3630
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3630 001/26860 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
702 Hamilton Hall
Jennifer Dwyer 3 70/70

POLS W3631 American Foreign Policy. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Introduction to American foreign policy since 1945 with an emphasis on post-cold war topics. Will cover major schools of American thought, the policy making process, and key policies and issues.

POLS W3659 International Cooperation and Institutions. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Why do governments and leaders cooperate? What is the role of international institutions in world politics? This course is an introduction to the systematic study of international cooperation and institutions. The course emphasizes recent empirical and theoretical research across issue areas.

POLS W3673 Power and Progress in International Relations. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS V1601 Introduction to International Politics (taken before or concurrently with this course) or the instructor's permission.

To understand the current geopolitical competition between liberal democratic states and other global forces, we will try to integrate the insights from the realist logic of struggle for domination and security-the logic of power-with the logic of political development and modernization -the logic of progress. Historical and contemporary themes will include the origins of the modern states system, the rise of nationalism and democratization, the management of the global market economy, decolonization, human rights activism, changing norms for the use of force, and multiple paths to modernity.

POLS UN3690 International Law. 4 points.

What is public international law, and what does it influence the behavior of states, corporations, and individuals in the international system? This introductory course engages these questions as well as the politics of applying and enforcing public international law in various contexts and issue areas. An understanding of basic international legal principles, institutions, and processes is developed through exploration of foundational cases, and by means of (required) participation in a multi-week group simulation of an international legal dispute.

Spring 2018: POLS UN3690
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3690 001/64731 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
407 International Affairs Bldg
Tonya Putnam 4 60/60

POLS UN3704 Data Analysis and Statistics for Political Science Research. 3 points.

This course examines the basic methods data analysis and statistics that political scientists use in quantitative research that attempts to make causal inferences about how the political world works. The same methods apply to other kinds of problems about cause and effect relationships more generally.  The course will provide students with extensive experience in analyzing data and in writing (and thus reading) research papers about testable theories and hypotheses.  It will cover basic data analysis and statistical methods, from univariate and bivariate descriptive and inferential statistics through multivariate regression analysis. Computer applications will be emphasized.   The course will focus largely on observational data used in cross-sectional statistical analysis, but it will consider issues of research design more broadly as well.  It will assume that students have no mathematical background beyond high school algebra and no experience using computers for data analysis.

Spring 2018: POLS UN3704
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3704 001/65498 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Robert Shapiro 3 100/100

POLS W3708 Empirical Research Methods. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: this course is intended for political science majors, and some exposure to political science is assumed. Familiarity with statistical software is helpful but not required. Students will be working with data in class throughout the term.

This course provides an introduction to selected research methods that are widely used in political science. The aim of the course is to familiarize students with the conceptual and methodological challenges that arise when researchers attempt to measure political phenomena, assess change over time, or demonstrate a causal relationship between policies and social outcomes. In order to reinforce core ideas and link them to ongoing political debates, students will conduct a series of small research projects that will involve statistical software, sampling, questionnaire development, and experimental design.

POLS UN3720 Scope and Methods. 4 points.

This class introduces students to a variety of statistical methods used to investigate political phenomena. We will address the principles behind these methods, their application, and their limitations. The course aims to provide anyone interested in political science with a proficient understanding of the intuitions behind several of the methods most commonly used to analyze political data and identify causal paths. By the end of the course, students will have acquired important analytical and practical skills and will be able to evaluate the quality and reliability of scholarly and journalistic work done using quantitative methods. Students will also learn basic statistical software skills (R).

Fall 2017: POLS UN3720
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3720 001/14011 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
413 Kent Hall
Chiara Superti 4 68/70
Spring 2018: POLS UN3720
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3720 001/25108 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
517 Hamilton Hall
Daniel Corstange 4 70/70

POLS UN3911 Seminar in Political Theory. 4 points.

Priority given to senior majors, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Pre-registration is not permitted.

Seminar in Political Theory. Students who would like to register should join the electronic wait list.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3911
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3911 001/61251 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Jon Elster 4 14/18
POLS 3911 002/21825 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
402 International Affairs Bldg
Luke MacInnis 4 10/18

POLS UN3912 Seminar in Political Theory. 4 points.

Priority given to senior majors, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Pre-registration is not permitted.

Seminar in Political Theory. Students who would like to register should join the electronic wait list.

Spring 2018: POLS UN3912
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3912 001/16983 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
610 Lewisohn Hall
Jon Elster 4 1/18
POLS 3912 002/28668 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
610 Lewisohn Hall
Maria Kowalski 4 14/18

POLS UN3921 Seminar in American Politics. 4 points.

Priority given to senior majors, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Pre-registration is not permitted.

Seminar in American Politics. Students who would like to register should join the electronic wait list.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3921
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3921 003/13606 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Martha Zebrowski 4 8/18
POLS 3921 004/65591 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
311 Fayerweather
Brigitte Nacos 4 15/22
POLS 3921 005/77679 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
317 Hamilton Hall
Robert Amdur 4 20/20
POLS 3921 007/22344 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Judith Russell 4 17/21
POLS 3921 011/28382 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Michael Ting 4 8/18
POLS 3921 013/17750 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
313 Hamilton Hall
Vanessa Perez 4 19/18
POLS 3921 014/23050 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
507 Hamilton Hall
Carlos Vargas-Ramos 4 12/18
POLS 3921 015/73346 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
522b Kent Hall
Gerrard Bushell 4 5/18
POLS 3921 016/79785 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
1201 International Affairs Bldg
Lincoln Mitchell 4 3/18

POLS UN3922 Seminar in American Politics. 4 points.

Priority given to senior majors, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission. Pre-registration is not permitted.

Seminar in American Politics. Students who would like to register should join the electronic wait list.

Spring 2018: POLS UN3922
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3922 001/71800 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
610 Lewisohn Hall
Shigeo Hirano 4 0/18
POLS 3922 002/12164 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Robert Erikson 4 0/18
POLS 3922 003/23542 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Fredrick Harris 4 3/18
POLS 3922 004/13569 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
John Sivolella 4 0/18
POLS 3922 005/17174 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Brigitte Nacos 4 0/18
POLS 3922 006/63521 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Martha Zebrowski 4 0/18
POLS 3922 007/18462 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
317 Hamilton Hall
Robert Amdur 4 0/18
POLS 3922 008/70909 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Judith Russell 4 3/18

POLS UN3930 Constitutional Law Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This seminar explores major features of U.S. constitutional law through close examination of selected decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court. Through student discussion and some lecturing, the seminar addresses issues arising from the Constitution's allocation of power among the three branches of government; the allocation of powers between the National and State governments, including, in particular, the scope of Congress' regulatory powers; and the protection of the individual from arbitrary and discriminatory government conduct, including the protections of the Fifth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments against unequal treatment based on race, gender and sexual orientation, the evolution of the concept of liberty from its protection of economic interests before the New Deal to its current role in protecting individual autonomy and privacy, and some aspects of the First Amendment's protection of freedom of speech and press. More generally the seminar aims to enhance understanding of some main aspects of our constitutional tradition and the judicial process by which it is elaborated.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3930
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3930 001/73831 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Sidney Rosdeitcher 4 17/18

POLS UN3951 Seminar in Comparative Politics. 4 points.

Priority given to senior majors, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

Prerequisites: POLS V1501 or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission. Pre-registration is not permitted. Please see here for detailed seminar registration guidelines: http://polisci.columbia.edu/undergraduate-programs/seminar-registration-guidelines.

Seminar in Comparative Politics. For most seminars, interested students must attend the first class meeting, after which the instructor will decide whom to admit.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3951
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3951 001/18670 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Hande Mutlu-Eren 4 7/18
POLS 3951 002/75387 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
501 International Affairs Bldg
Rumela Sen 4 5/18

POLS UN3952 Seminar in Comparative Politics. 4 points.

Seminar in Comparative Politics. Interested students must attend the first class meeting after which the instructor will decide whom to admit.

Spring 2018: POLS UN3952
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3952 001/60921 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
610 Lewisohn Hall
Chiara Superti 4 8/18
POLS 3952 003/64695 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Isabela Mares 4 16/18

POLS UN3961 International Politics Seminar. 4 points.

Priority given to senior majors, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

Prerequisites: POLS UN1601 or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission.
International Politics Seminar. Students who would like to register should join the electronic wait list.,Topics for Fall 2017:,Section 001: NATIONAL SECURITY POLICY; Instructor: Richard K Betts,Section 002: CONTEMPORARY DIPLOMACY; Instructor: Rebecca S Murphy,Section 003: INTERNATIONAL LAW; Instructor: Jean Krasno,Section 005: INEQUALITY WITHIN AND BTWN NATIONS:Instructor: David E Spiro,Section 006: THE COLD WAR; Instructor: Robert L Jervis,Section 007: POLITICAL VIOLENCE; Instructor: Linda M Kirschke,Section 008: NORTH KOREA AND WMD; Instructor: Joel Stephen Wit

Fall 2017: POLS UN3961
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3961 001/18554 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
1302 International Affairs Bldg
Richard Betts 4 15/18
POLS 3961 002/26410 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Rebecca Murphy 4 19/21
POLS 3961 003/67627 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Jean Krasno 4 19/19
POLS 3961 005/89284 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
David Spiro 4 14/18
POLS 3961 006/25267 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
1302 International Affairs Bldg
Robert Jervis 4 15/22
POLS 3961 007/23329 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
270b International Affairs Bldg
Linda Kirschke 4 6/18
POLS 3961 008/66270 F 12:10pm - 2:00pm
201b Philosophy Hall
Joel Stephen Wit 4 9/18

POLS UN3962 Seminar in International Politics. 4 points.

Priority given to senior majors, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

Prerequisites: POLS V1601 or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission.

Seminar in International Relations. Students who would like to register should join the electronic wait list.

Spring 2018: POLS UN3962
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3962 001/69636 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
1302 International Affairs Bldg
Virginia Page Fortna 4 0/18
POLS 3962 002/73948 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
1302 International Affairs Bldg
Allison Carnegie 4 18/18
POLS 3962 003/75900 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
610 Lewisohn Hall
Shahrough Akhavi 4 0/18
POLS 3962 004/21138 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
1302 International Affairs Bldg
Jack Snyder 4 0/18
POLS 3962 005/13277 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
405a International Affairs Bldg
Dawn Brancati 4 0/18
POLS 3962 006/68314 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
606 Lewisohn Hall
Stephanie Schwartz 4 0/18
POLS 3962 007/10033 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
610 Lewisohn Hall
Zachariah Mampilly 4 0/18

POLS W4205 Politics, Crime and Punishment. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 Intro to American Politics or the equivalent.

This course investigates the politics of crime and the criminal justice system. We investigate the origins of the politics of law and order from the mid-twentieth century to today, against a broader backdrop of partisan competition, urban de-industrialization, and socio-cultural tensions. Particular attention is paid to the role of politicians and political institutions such as the Congress, the Judiciary and federal, state and local bureaucracies such as local police in conceptualizing the need for a "war on crime;" and developing the political and institutional mechanisms for carrying out this war. The course reviews the current political, institutional and societal developments arising from the war on crime and current debates amongst politicians and policymakers. Issues such as sentencing disparities; racial differences in death penalty cases; New York City's "stop and frisk" policy; and, felon disenfranchisement, are among some of the topics that will be covered in this course. Students will analyze a mix of social science research, legal cases, and policy analyses, as a means of understanding the political development of the American criminal justice. Readings and in-class discussions will be supplemented by guest speakers drawn from organizations involved in the crime/criminal justice system.

POLS GU4461 Latin American Politics. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., Discussion Section Required

This is a lecture class that seeks to introduce students to social scientific analysis while discuss the shifting dynamics of political representation in Latin America. In analyzing political representation in the region, it focuses on demands for political inclusion by different actors and how they were resisted or accepted by established elites in a process that moved from regime change to electoral rotation in power. The course covers these political dynamics and their institutional consequences since the onset of the twentieth century, starting with the Mexican Revolution, until the contemporary period where democracy is the predominant form of government and elections a crucial tool for social and political change. While analyzing the politics of Latin America, we will cover important political science concepts associated with democratic representation, social inclusion and the rule of the law, such as social movement mobilization, political regime change, presidentialism, political party systems, political identities, state capacity, and institutional weakness.

Fall 2017: POLS GU4461
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4461 001/72524 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
602 Hamilton Hall
Maria Victoria Murillo 4 66/70

POLS G4471 Chinese Politics. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An introduction to the politics of the People's Republic of China since 1978 that examines why and how a Leninist system attempts to reform and the consequences. Topics covered include one party rule, market transition, property rights, and grassroots democracy among many others.

POLS G4491 Post-Soviet States and Markets. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Recommended preparation: some familiarity with Communist or post-Communist states.

Considers the collapse of Communism in the Soviet Union and the challenge of building new political and economic systems in the post-Communist space. Evaluates contending theories of markets, transitions, constitutions, federalism, and democratic institutions. Primary focus on the post-Soviet states, with some reference to Eastern Europe and China.

POLS G4610 Recent Continental Political Thought. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will compare and contrast the theories of the political, the state,freedom, democracy, sovereignty and law, in the works of the following key 20th and 21st century continental theorists: Arendt, Castoriadis, Foucault, Habermas, Kelsen, Lefort, Schmitt, and Weber. It will be taught in seminar format. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 4110.

POLS GU4871 Chinese Foreign Policy. 4 points.

The course describes the major elements of Chinese foreign policy today, in the context of their development since 1949. We seek to understand the security-based rationale of policy as well as other factors - organizational, cultural, perceptual, and so on - that influence Chinese foreign policy. We analyze decision-making processes that affect Chinese foreign policy, China's relations with various countries and regions, Chinese policy toward key functional issues in international affairs, how the rise of China is affecting global power relations, and how other actors are responding. The course pays attention to the application of international relations theories to the problems we study, and also takes an interest in policy issues facing decision-makers in China as well as those facing decision-makers in other countries who deal with China.

Spring 2018: POLS GU4871
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4871 001/69757 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Andrew Nathan 4 133/170

POLS GU4895 War, Peace, and Strategy. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Survey of the causes of war and peace, functions of military strategy, interaction of political ends and military means. Emphasis on 20th-century conflicts; nuclear deterrence; economic, technological, and moral aspects of strategy; crisis management; and institutional norms and mechanisms for promoting stability.

Fall 2017: POLS GU4895
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4895 001/74922 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
417 International Affairs Bldg
Richard Betts 4 59/100

POLS W4496 Contemporary African Politics. 3 points.

This course aims to teach students what, if any, answers social scientists have to the questions that concern anyone with an interest in African politics: 1) Why have democratic governments flourished in some countries and not others? 2) What institutions may enable Africans to hold their leaders accountable? 3) How do people participate in politics? 4) In what ways do aspiring African political leaders build public support? 5) To what extent does persistent poverty on the continent have political causes? and 6) Why is violence used to resolve some political disputes and not others?

URBS V3315 Metropolitics of Race and Place. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Students must attend first class.

Course explores how the central cities and suburbs that make up American metropolitan areas are increasingly shaped by race/ethnicity. Class discussion and readings will trace the role of social scientists, foundations, urban planners, government actors, and private economic interests in this transformation of metropolitan American. The current consequences of the conflation of race/ethnicity and space on the regional landscape, such as gentrification, suburban sprawl, the mortgage foreclosure crisis, etc. will be the focus of student research and class projects.

HRTS BC3061 Human Rights & the UN in Practice. 4 points.