Slavic

http://slavic.barnard.edu/

226 Milbank Hall
212-854-5417
212-854-8266 (fax)
Department Assistant: Mary Missirian 

Mission

The primary mission of the Slavic Department at Barnard is to prepare students linguistically, culturally, and academically to participate in the global community, specifically by engaging with the Slavic-speaking world.  To this end, the Department, in cooperation with its Columbia counterpart, offers instruction in five Slavic languages and literatures, with particular emphasis on Russian. The department insists upon a strong foundation in language study, because this best prepares students for future involvement with the countries of Eastern Europe and Eurasia, as well as for graduate study in the literature, anthropology, sociology, history, economics, or politics of the region, and for careers in government, business, journalism, or international law.

The department offers major tracks in Russian Language and Literature, Slavic and East European Literature and Culture, Russian Regional Studies, and Slavic and East European Regional Studies.  A minor program in Russian Literature and Culture is also available.  These programs are supported by an extensive array of courses designed to help the student obtain reasonable fluency in the spoken and written language and a reading ability adequate for interpreting texts of some difficulty in a variety of disciplines. While offering a range of courses designed to give the student a strong general background in Russian and Slavic literature, film, culture, and intellectual history, the department encourages students to supplement their knowledge by taking courses devoted to Russia, the former Soviet Union, and Eastern Europe offered in other disciplines as well. The department co-sponsors and facilitates student participation in region-related extra-curricular activities held at the Harriman Institute and the Columbia Slavic Department and also fosters student engagement with the rich cultural resources available in New York City.

Student Learning Outcomes

In recognition of the National Standards for Foreign Language Learning published by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, the Slavic Department expects the following outcomes for students in each of its major tracks:

  • Communication.  Students should be able to communicate orally and in writing in the language of study, and understand and interpret written and spoken language on a variety of topics.
  • Cultures.  Students should demonstrate an understanding of the perspectives, products, and practices of the culture studied.
  • Connections.  Students should be able to acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints available to them through the foreign language and its cultures.
  • Comparisons.  Students should develop comparative insights into the nature of language and culture as a result of studying a language and culture other than their own.
  • Communities.  Students should be prepared to participate in multilingual communities at home and around the world.

In addition, the Department expects the following outcomes of all majors:

  • Students should demonstrate broad knowledge of at least one major aspect (e.g. literature, politics, or history) of the culture studied
  • Students should acquire and convey, in an appropriate academic form, deep knowledge of a particular topic or question relating to the culture studied

Entering students should see Professor Frank Miller (708 Hamilton, 854-3941) for a placement examination: a sufficiently high grade will automatically fulfill the language requirement; other students will be placed accordingly. Native speakers of Russian or any Slavic language should consult with the department chair. The Department is a member of "Dobro Slovo" (The National Slavic Honor Society) and is pleased to induct its qualifying students into the society.

Acting Chair: Helene Foley (Professor of Classics)
Term Assistant Professor: Holly Myers
Adjunct Lecturer: Vasily Lvov

Other officers of the University offering courses in Slavic:

Professors: Valentina Izmirlieva (on leave), Liza Knapp (DGS), Cathy Popkin (DUS), Irina Reyfman (Chair), Mark Lipovetsky (Leiderman)
Assistant Professors: Adam E. Leeds, Jessica E. Merrill (on leave)
Lecturers: Alla Smyslova (Russian Language Program Director), Aleksandar Boskovic, Christopher Caes, Christopher Harwood, Nataliya Kun, Mona M. Momescu, Yuri Shevchuk,  
 

Liza Knapp (Director, Graduate Studies)
Cathy Popkin (Director, Undergraduate Studies)  

Requirements for the Major

There are four majors available to students in the department. Prospective students are encouraged to consult with a member of the faculty as early as possible in order to determine the major track and selection of courses that will best serve her background and interests.

Russian Language and Literature

Select four years of Russian: *
RUSS UN1101
 - RUSS UN1102
First-year Russian I
and First-year Russian II
10
RUSS UN1201
 - RUSS UN2102
Second-year Russian I
and Second-year Russian II
10
RUSS UN3101
 - RUSS UN3102
Third-year Russian I
and Third-Year Russian II
8
RUSS UN3430
 - RUSS UN3431
Russian for Heritage Speakers I
and Russian for Heritage Speakers II
6
RUSS W4333Fourth-year Russian I4
RUSS GU4334Fourth-year Russian II4
Select six courses in Russian Literatures to include: **
RUSS UN3220Literature and Empire: The Reign of the Novel in Russia (19th Century) [In English]3
RUSS UN3221Literature & Revolution [In English]3
At least two courses with required reading in Russian
RUSS UN3595Senior Seminar3

Slavic and East European Literature and Culture

Completion of third-year course (or the equivalent in Czech, Polish, Serbo-Croatian, or Ukrainian language
Select six courses in literature, theatre, or film of the region, potentially including independent study courses
Select two courses in related fields (history, art history, music, etc.) to include at least one course in the history of the region
Select two semesters of senior seminar or the equivalent leading to the completion of a senior thesis

Note: A student in this major must design her program in close consultation with her adviser in order to insure intellectual, disciplinary, and regional coherence.

Russian Regional Studies

Select four years of Russian:
RUSS UN1101
 - RUSS UN1102
First-year Russian I
and First-year Russian II
10
RUSS UN1201
 - RUSS UN2102
Second-year Russian I
and Second-year Russian II
10
Select two courses in Russian or Soviet Literature (in translation or in Russian)
RUSS UN3101Third-year Russian I4
RUSS UN3102Third-Year Russian II4
RUSS W4333Fourth-year Russian I4
RUSS GU4334Fourth-year Russian II4
Select two courses in Russian History
Select one course on Russia or the Soviet Union in any discipline (history, art history, geography, sociology, economics, literature, political science, etc.)
Select one course in Soviet/post-Soviet politics
Two semesters of a senior research seminar or the equivalent in independent study with research to be conducted predominantly in Russian language sources

Note: In consultation with her adviser, a student may elect to take one or more courses devoted to a region other than Russia that is located on the territory of the former Soviet Union.

Slavic and East European Regional Studies Major-Czech, Polish, Serbo-Croatian, Ukrainian

Select three years of language study
Select two courses Literature in relevant region
Select two courses of history in relevant region
Select one course on relevant region in any discipline (history, art history, geography, sociology, economics, literature, political science, etc.)
One course on politics in relevant region
Two semester of a senior research seminar or the equivalent in independent study with research to be conducted predominantly in relevant region's language sources

Requirements for the Minor

Minor in Russian

The Minor in Russian allows students to study the language and culture of Russia at a smaller scale than a Major. A total of five courses (minimum 15 credits) beyond the second year of Russian are required. These courses should relate to the language and culture of Russia. Courses should be selected in consultation with a Slavic Department faculty member.

Minor in Czech, Polish, Serbo-Croatian or Ukrainian

A Minor in a Slavic language other than Russian allow students to pursue in-depth studies of this language and the region on a smaller scale than the one required for a Major. The Barnard Minor in Czech, Polish, Serbo-Croatian or Ukrainian consists of five courses (minimum 15 credits) beyond the second year of language study. It requires that three (3) of these courses be related to the country of the language (Poland, Czech Republic, etc) while the other two (2) should be related to the region and its cultural history more broadly.

Russian Language

RUSS UN1101 First-year Russian I. 5 points.

Grammar, reading, composition, and conversation.

Fall 2019: RUSS UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 1101 001/53927 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Claudia Kelley 5 6/12
RUSS 1101 002/53928 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
Room TBA
Madeline Tingle 5 3/12
RUSS 1101 003/53929 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
709 Hamilton Hall
Nataliya Kun 5 6/12
RUSS 1101 004/53930 M T W Th 6:10pm - 7:15pm
709 Hamilton Hall
Max Lawton 5 3/12

RUSS UN1102 First-year Russian II. 5 points.

Grammar, reading, composition, and conversation.

Spring 2019: RUSS UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 1102 001/20190 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
709 Hamilton Hall
Elaine Wilson 5 13/12
RUSS 1102 002/26862 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
709 Hamilton Hall
Milica Ilicic 5 10/12
RUSS 1102 003/24562 W 1:10pm - 2:15pm
432 Horace Mann Hall
Tomi Haxhi 5 11/12
RUSS 1102 003/24562 M T Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
436 Horace Mann Hall
Tomi Haxhi 5 11/12
RUSS 1102 004/71990 M T W Th 6:10pm - 7:15pm
709 Hamilton Hall
Stephen Bruce 5 8/12

RUSS UN2101 Second-Year Russian I . 5 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS UN1102 or the equivalent.

Drill practice in small groups. Reading, composition, and grammar review."Off-sequence" 

Fall 2019: RUSS UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 2101 001/53931 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
709 Hamilton Hall
Elaine Wilson 5 11/12
RUSS 2101 002/53932 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
709 Hamilton Hall
Stephen Bruce 5 14/12
RUSS 2101 003/53933 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
Room TBA
Tomi Haxhi 5 9/12

RUSS UN2102 Second-year Russian II. 5 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS UN2101 or the equivalent.

Drill practice in small groups. Reading, composition, and grammar review.

Spring 2019: RUSS UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 2102 001/22531 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
613 Hamilton Hall
Ben Hooyman 5 9/12
RUSS 2102 002/10641 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
522b Kent Hall
Benjamin Lussier 5 9/12
RUSS 2102 003/21711 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
316 Hamilton Hall
Vera Senina 5 8/12

RUSS UN3101 Third-year Russian I. 4 points.

Limited enrollment.

Prerequisites: RUSS UN2102 or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission.

Recommended for students who wish to improve their active command of Russian. Emphasis on conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of selected texts and videotapes. Lectures. Papers and oral reports required. Conducted entirely in Russian.

Fall 2019: RUSS UN3101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3101 001/53920 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
709 Hamilton Hall
Alla Smyslova 4 7/12
RUSS 3101 002/53921 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Vasily Lvov 4 2/12

RUSS UN3102 Third-Year Russian II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS UN2102 or the equivalent and the instructor's permission.

Enrollment limited. Recommended for students who wish to improve their active command of Russian. Emphasis on conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of selected texts and videotapes. Lectures. Papers and oral reports required. Conducted entirely in Russian.

Spring 2019: RUSS UN3102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3102 001/75423 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
315 Hamilton Hall
Alla Smyslova 4 8/12
RUSS 3102 002/64636 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
718 Hamilton Hall
Nataliya Kun 4 4/12

RUSS UN3105 Real World Russian. 3 points.

Prerequisites: (RUSS UN2102) (department placement test)

This content-based course has three focal points: 1) communicative skills 1) idiomatic language; 3) cross-cultural awareness.

The course is designed to help students further develop all of their language skills with particular focus on communicative and information processing skills, as well as natural student collaboration in the target language. The materials and assignments that will be used in class allow to explore a broad range of social, cultural, and behavioral contexts and familiarize students with idiomatic language, popular phrases and internet memes, developments of the colloquial language, and the use of slang in everyday life.

On each class students will be offered a variety of content-based activities and assignments, including, information gap filling, role-play and creative skits, internet search, making presentations, and problem-solving discussions. Listening comprehension assignments will help students expand their active and passive vocabulary and develop confidence using natural syntactic models and idiomatic structures.

Students will be exposed to cultural texts of different registers, which will help them enhance their stylistic competence. Students will learn appropriate ways to handle linguo-social situations, routines, and challenges similar to those they come across when traveling to Russia. They will explore various speech acts of daily communication, such as agreement/disagreement, getting and giving help, asking for a favor, expressing emotions, and so forth. Part of class time will be devoted to nonverbal communication, the language of gestures, emotional phonetics and intonation.

Spring 2019: RUSS UN3105
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3105 001/11496 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
709 Hamilton Hall
Nataliya Kun 3 6/15
Fall 2019: RUSS UN3105
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3105 001/53919 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Nataliya Kun 3 4/15

RUSS UN3430 Russian for Heritage Speakers I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS V3430 or the instructor's permission.

This course is designed to help students who speak Russian at home, but have no or limited reading and writing skills to develop literary skills in Russian. THIS COURSE, TAKEN WITH RUSS V3431, MEET A TWO YEAR FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT. Conducted in Russian.

Fall 2019: RUSS UN3430
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3430 001/53923 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Alla Smyslova 3 4/15

RUSS UN3431 Russian for Heritage Speakers II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS V3430 or the instructor's permission.

This course is designed to help students who speak Russian at home, but have no or limited reading and writing skills to develop literary skills in Russian. THIS COURSE, TAKEN WITH RUSS V3430, MEET A TWO YEAR FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT. Conducted in Russian.

Spring 2019: RUSS UN3431
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3431 001/63648 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Alla Smyslova 3 19/15

RUSS GU4342 Fourth-year Russian I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS UN3101 and RUSS UN3102 Third-Year Russian I and II, or placement test.

Systematic study of problems in Russian syntax; written exercises, translations into Russian, and compositions. Conducted entirely in Russian.

Fall 2019: RUSS GU4342
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 4342 001/09531 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Vasily Lvov 4 6/12

RUSS GU4334 Fourth-year Russian II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: three years of college Russian and the instructor's permission.

Discussion of different styles and levels of language, including word usage and idiomatic expression; written exercises, analysis of texts, and compositions. Conducted entirely in Russian.

RUSS GU4344 Chteniia po russkoi kul'ture: Advanced Russian Through History. 3 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS UN3101 and RUSS UN3102 Third-Year Russian I and II, or placement test.

A language course designed to meet the needs of those foreign learners of Russian as well as heritage speakers who want to develop further their reading, speaking, and writing skills and be introduced to the history of Russia.

Fall 2019: RUSS GU4344
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 4344 001/09532 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Vasily Lvov 3 13

RUSS GU4345 Chteniia po russkoi kul'ture: Advanced Russian Through History. 3 points.

Prerequisites: three years of Russian.

This is a language course designed to meet the needs of those foreign learners of Russian as well as heritage speakers who want to further develop their reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills and be introduced to the history of Russia.

RUSS GU4350 Moving to Advanced-Plus: Language, Culture, Society in Russian Today. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Six semesters of college Russian and the instructor's permission.

The course is designed to provide advanced and highly-motivated undergraduate and graduate students of various majors with an opportunity to develop professional vocabulary and discourse devices that will help them to discuss their professional fields in Russian with fluency and accuracy. The course targets all four language competencies: speaking, listening, reading and writing, as well as cultural understanding. Conducted in Russian.

RUSS GU4434 Practical Stylistics [in Russian]. 3 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS W4334 or the equivalent or the instructor's permission.

Prerequisite: four years of college Russian or instructor's permission. The course will focus on theoretical matters of language and style and on the practical aspect of improving students' writing skills. Theoretical aspects of Russian style and specific Russian stylistic conventions will be combined with the analysis of student papers and translation assignments, as well as exercises focusing on reviewing certain specific difficulties in mastering written Russian.

Russian Literature and Culture (in English)

RUSS UN3220 Literature and Empire: The Reign of the Novel in Russia (19th Century) [In English]. 3 points.

Explores the aesthetic and formal developments in Russian prose, especially the rise of the monumental 19th-century novel, as one manifestation of a complex array of national and cultural aspirations, humanistic and imperialist ones alike. Works by Pushkin, Lermonotov, Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov. Knowledge of Russian not required.

Fall 2019: RUSS UN3220
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3220 001/53898 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Cathy Popkin 3 53/60

RUSS UN3221 Literature & Revolution [In English]. 3 points.

The revolutionary period (1905-1938) in Russia was not only one of extreme social upheaval but also of exceptional creativity. Established ideas about individuality and collectivity, about how to depict reality, about language, gender, authority, and violence, were all thrown open to radical questioning. Out of this chaos came ideas about literature and film (just for example) which have shaped Western thought on these subjects to this day. In this course we will study a variety of media and genres (poetry, manifestos, film, painting, photomontage, the novel, theoretical essays) in an effort to gain a deep understanding of this complex and fascinating period in Russian cultural history.

Spring 2019: RUSS UN3221
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3221 001/66583 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
644 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Jessica Merrill 3 15/40

RUSS UN3595 Senior Seminar. 3 points.

A research and writing workshop designed to help students plan and execute a major research project, and communicate their ideas in a common scholarly language that crosses disciplinary boundaries.  Content is determined by students' thesis topics, and includes general sessions on how to formulate a proposal and how to generate a bibliography.  Students present the fruits of their research in class discussions, culminating in a full-length seminar presentation and the submission of the written thesis.

CLRS GU4011 Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and the English Novel [in English]. 3 points.

A close reading of works by Dostoevsky (Netochka Nezvanova; The Idiot; "A Gentle Creature") and Tolstoy (Childhood, Boyhood, Youth; "Family Happiness"; Anna Karenina; "The Kreutzer Sonata") in conjunction with related English novels (Bronte's Jane Eyre, Eliot's Middlemarch, Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway). No knowledge of Russian is required.

Fall 2019: CLRS GU4011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLRS 4011 001/53900 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Liza Knapp 3 46/80

CLRS W4017 Chekhov [English]. 3 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

A close reading of Chekhov's best work in the genres on which he left an indelible mark (the short story and the drama) on the subjects that left an indelible imprint on him (medical science, the human body, identity, topography, the nature of news, the problem of knowledge, the access to pain, the necessity of dying, the structure of time, the self and the world, the part and the whole) via the modes of inquiry (diagnosis and deposition, expedition and exegesis, library and laboratory, microscopy and materialism, intimacy and invasion) and forms of documentation (the itinerary, the map, the calendar, the photograph, the icon, the Gospel, the Koan, the lie, the love letter, the case history, the obituary, the pseudonym, the script) that marked his era (and ours). No knowledge of Russian required.

RUSS GU4107 Russian Literature and Culture in the New Millennium. 3 points.

Survey of Russian literature and culture from the late 1970s until today. Works by Petrushevskaya, Pelevin, Tolstaya, Sorokin, Ulitskaya, Akunin, Rubinshtein, Prigov, Vasilenko, and others. Literature, visual art, and film are examined in social and political context. Knowledge of Russian not required.

Fall 2019: RUSS GU4107
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 4107 001/53936 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
709 Hamilton Hall
Mark Leiderman 3 8/45

CLRS GU4037 Poets, Rebels, Exiles: 100 Years of Russian and Rusian Jews in America. 3 points.

Poets, Rebels, Exiles examines the successive generations of the most provocative and influential Russian and Russian Jewish writers and artists who brought the cataclysm of the Soviet and post-Soviet century to North America. From Joseph Brodsky—the bad boy bard of Soviet Russia and a protégé of Anna Akhmatova, who served 18 months of hard labor near the North Pole for social parasitism before being exiled—to the most recent artistic descendants, this course will interrogate diaspora, memory, and nostalgia in the cultural production of immigrants and exiles.

Fall 2019: CLRS GU4037
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLRS 4037 001/13993 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
1201 International Affairs Bldg
Anna Katsnelson 3 1/25

Russian Literature and Culture (in Russian)

RUSS UN3333 Vvedenie v russkuiu literaturu: Poor Liza, Poor Olga, Poor Me. 3 points.

For non-native speakers of Russian.

Prerequisites: two years of college Russian or the instructor's permission.

The course is devoted to the reading, analysis, and discussion of a number of Russian prose fiction works from the eighteenth to twentieth century. Its purpose is to give students an opportunity to apply their language skills to literature. It will teach students to read Russian literary texts as well as to talk and write about them. Its goal is, thus, twofold: to improve the students’ linguistic skills and to introduce them to Russian literature and literary history. In 2007-2008: A close study in the original of the “fallen woman” plot in Russian literature from the late eighteenth century. Conducted in Russian.

Fall 2019: RUSS UN3333
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3333 001/53934 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Irina Reyfman 3 7/18

RUSS W4339 Chteniia po russkoi literature: Pushkin. 3 points.

Not offered during 2019-20 academic year.

Prerequisites: three years of college Russian and the instructor's permission.

A survey of Alexander Pushkin's poetry and prose in the original. Emphasis on the emergence of a new figure of the Poet in Russin in the 1820-1830s. Linguistic analysis of the poetic texts (vocabulary, metrics, versification) will be combined with the study of Russian History and Culture as reflected in Pushkin's writings.

RUSS GU4910 Literary Translation. 4 points.

Prerequisites: four years of college Russian or the equivalent.

Workshop in literary translation from Russian into English focusing on the practical problems of the craft. Each student submits a translation of a literary text for group study and criticism. The aim is to produce translations of publishable quality.

Fall 2019: RUSS GU4910
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 4910 001/53922 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Ronald Meyer 4 4/12

Slavic Literature and Culture

SLCL UN3001 Slavic Cultures. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

The history of Slavic peoples - Russians, Czechs, Poles, Serbs, Croats, Ukrainians, Bulgarians - is rife with transformations, some voluntary, some imposed. Against the background of a schematic external history, this course examines how Slavic peoples have responded to and have represented these transformations in various modes: historical writing, hagiography, polemics, drama and fiction, folk poetry, music, visual art, and film. Activity ranges over lecture (for historical background) and discussion (of primary sources).

Fall 2019: SLCL UN3001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SLCL 3001 001/53906 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Alan Timberlake 3 80/80

SLCL UN3333 The Vampire in Myth, Literature, and Film. 3 points.

The vampire is one of the most popular and enduring images in the world, giving rise to hundreds of monster movies around the globe every year, not to mention novels, short stories, plays, TV shows, and commercial merchandise. Yet the Western vampire image that we know from the film, television, and literature of today is very different from its Slavic and Eastern European progenitors. Nina Auerbach has said that “every age creates the vampire that it needs.” In this course we will explore the Slavic and Eastern European origins of the vampire and how the vampire—in its look, nature, vulnerabilities, and threat—has changed over the centuries.


This approach will provide us with the means to learn about the geography, village and urban cultures, traditional social structure, and religions of Russia and Eastern Europe; the nature and manifestations of Evil and the concept of Limited Good; and major historical and intellectual periods (the settlement of Europe, the Age of Reason, Romanticism, Neo-classicism, the Enlightenment, the Victorian era, up to today). We will examine how the vampire manifested itself in European literature and then in the entertainment (and commercial) media of today, through numerous and various readings of fictional, ethnographic, and scholarly works, the analysis of folklore materials, as well as the viewing of movies, television shows, and Internet sites, not only from the U.S. and Europe but from around the world.


In analyzing the metaphor of the vampire, from Slavic and East European myth to contemporary Western media, we will investigate how the vampire evolved from association with disease to countercultural and civil rights movements. By the end of the course, students will be able to discuss the origins, classifications, functions, natures, and evolution of the vampire and what that can tell us about historical periods and our own contemporary cultures.


No prerequisites.

RMAN GU4002 Romanian Culture, Identity and Complexes. 3 points.

This course addresses the main problems that contribute to the making of Romanian identity, as fragmented or as controversial as it may seem to those who study it. The aim is to become familiar with the deepest patterns of Romanian identity, as we encounter it today, either in history, political studies, fieldwork in sociology or, simply, when we interact with Romanians. By using readings and presentations produced by Romanian specialists, we aim to be able to see the culture with an "insider's eye", as much as we can. This perspective will enable us to develop mechanisms of understanding the Romanian culture and mentality independently, at a more profound level and to reason upon them.

Fall 2019: RMAN GU4002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RMAN 4002 001/53905 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Mona Momescu 3 2/15

CLSL GU4075 Soviet and Post-Soviet, Colonial and Post Colonial Film. 3 points.

The course will discuss how filmmaking has been used as an instrument of power and imperial domination in the Soviet Union as well as on post-Soviet space since 1991. A body of selected films by Soviet and post-Soviet directors which exemplify the function of filmmaking as a tool of appropriation of the colonized, their cultural and political subordination by the Soviet center will be examined in terms of postcolonial theories. The course will focus both on Russian cinema and often overlooked work of Ukrainian, Georgian, Belarusian, Armenian, etc. national film schools and how they participated in the communist project of fostering a «new historic community of the Soviet people» as well as resisted it by generating, in hidden and, since 1991, overt and increasingly assertive ways their own counter-narratives. Close attention will be paid to the new Russian film as it re-invents itself within the post-Soviet imperial momentum projected on the former Soviet colonies.

Fall 2019: CLSL GU4075
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLSL 4075 001/53913 T 6:10pm - 10:00pm
Room TBA
Yuri Shevchuk 3 9/40

Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian Literature and Culture

BCRS UN1101 Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Fall 2019: BCRS UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 1101 001/53908 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Aleksandar Boskovic 4 6/12

BCRS UN1102 Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Spring 2019: BCRS UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 1102 001/62589 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
352c International Affairs Bldg
Alexey Pekov 4 4/12

BCRS UN1201 Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BCRS W1102 or the equivalent.

Readings in Serbian/Croatian/Bosnian literature in the original, with emphasis depending upon the needs of individual students. This course number is being changed to BCRS 2101

BCRS GU4331 Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BCRS UN2102

Further develops skills in speaking, reading, and writing, using essays, short stories, films, and fragments of larger works. Reinforces basic grammar and introduces more complete structures.

Fall 2019: BCRS GU4331
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 4331 001/53910 M W 1:10am - 2:25am
Room TBA
Aleksandar Boskovic 3 1/12

BCRS GU4332 Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BCRS UN2102

Further develops skills in speaking, reading, and writing, using essays, short stories, films, and fragments of larger works. Reinforces basic grammar and introduces more complete structures.

Spring 2019: BCRS GU4332
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 4332 001/71229 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
255 International Affairs Bldg
Aleksandar Boskovic 3 5/12

Czech Language and Literature

CZCH UN1101 Elementary Czech I. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepare students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Fall 2019: CZCH UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CZCH 1101 001/53902 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Christopher Harwood 4 2/12

CZCH UN1102 Elementary Czech II. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepare students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Spring 2019: CZCH UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CZCH 1102 001/23039 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
352b International Affairs Bldg
Christopher Harwood 4 4/12
CZCH 1102 001/23039 F 8:50am - 10:05am
352b International Affairs Bldg
Christopher Harwood 4 4/12

CZCH UN1201 Intermediate Czech I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: CZCH W1102 or the equivalent.

Rapid review of grammar. Readings in contemporary fiction and nonfiction, depending upon the interests of individual students. This course number is being changed to CZCH 2101

CZCH UN2102 Intermediate Czech II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: CZCH UN1102 or the equivalent.

Rapid review of grammar. Readings in contemporary fiction and nonfiction, depending upon the interests of individual students.

CLCZ GU4035 The Writers of Prague. 3 points.

A survey of the Czech, German, and German-Jewish literary cultures of Prague from 1910 to 1920. Special attention to Hašek, ÄŒapek, Kafka, Werfel, and Rilke. Parallel reading lists available in English and in the original.

Fall 2019: CLCZ GU4035
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLCZ 4035 001/53914 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Christopher Harwood 3 3/15

CZCH GU4333 Readings in Czech Literature, I. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Prerequisites: two years of college Czech or the equivalent.

A close study in the original of representative works of Czech literature. Discussion and writing assignments in Czech aimed at developing advanced language proficiency.

Fall 2019: CZCH GU4333
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CZCH 4333 001/53915 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Christopher Harwood 3 0/12

CZCH GU4334 Readings in Czech Literature, II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: two years of college Czech or the equivalent.

A close study in the original of representative works of Czech literature. Discussion and writing assignments in Czech aimed at developing advanced language proficiency.

Spring 2019: CZCH GU4334
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CZCH 4334 001/17247 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
607 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Harwood 3 1/12

Polish Language and Literature

POLI UN1101 Elementary Polish I. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Fall 2019: POLI UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 1101 001/53901 T Th F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Christopher Caes 4 4/12

POLI UN1102 Elementary Polish II. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Spring 2019: POLI UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 1102 001/15569 T Th F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
116 Knox Hall
Christopher Caes 4 6/12

POLI UN1201 Intermediate Polish I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLI W1102 or the equivalent.

Rapid review of grammar; readings in contemporary nonfiction or fiction, depending on the interests of individual students. This course number is being changed to POLI 2101

POLI UN2102 Intermediate Polish II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLI UN1102 or the equivalent.

Rapid review of grammar; readings in contemporary nonfiction or fiction, depending on the interests of individual students.

Spring 2019: POLI UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 2102 001/60533 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
116 Knox Hall
Christopher Caes 4 8/12

POLI GU4101 Advanced Polish I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: two years of college Polish or the instructor's permission.

Extensive readings from 19th- and 20th-century texts in the original. Both fiction and nonfiction, with emphasis depending on the interests and needs of individual students.

Fall 2019: POLI GU4101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 4101 001/53896 T Th F 11:40am - NaN:55am
Room TBA
Christopher Caes 4 6/12

POLI GU4102 Advanced Polish II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: two years of college Polish or the instructor's permission.

Extensive readings from 19th- and 20th-century texts in the original. Both fiction and nonfiction, with emphasis depending on the interests and needs of individual students.

Spring 2019: POLI GU4102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 4102 001/28118 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
116 Knox Hall
Christopher Caes 4 4/12

Ukrainian Language and Literature

UKRN UN1101 Elementary Ukrainian I. 3 points.

Designed for students with little or no knowledge of Ukrainian. Basic grammar structures are introduced and reinforced, with equal emphasis on developing oral and written communication skills. Specific attention to acquisition of high-frequency vocabulary and its optimal use in real-life settings.

Fall 2019: UKRN UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 1101 001/53911 M W Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Yuri Shevchuk 3 2/12

UKRN UN1102 Elementary Ukrainian II. 3 points.

Designed for students with little or no knowledge of Ukrainian. Basic grammar structures are introduced and reinforced, with equal emphasis on developing oral and written communication skills. Specific attention to acquisition of high-frequency vocabulary and its optimal use in real-life settings.

Spring 2019: UKRN UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 1102 001/22582 M W Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
351a International Affairs Bldg
Yuri Shevchuk 3 2/12

UKRN UN1201 Intermediate Ukrainian I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: UKRN W1102 or the equivalent.

Reviews and reinforces the fundamentals of grammar and a core vocabulary from daily life. Principal emphasis is placed on further development of communicative skills (oral and written). Verbal aspect and verbs of motion receive special attention. This course number is being changed to UKRN 2101

UKRN UN2102 Intermediate Ukrainian II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: UKRN UN1102 or the equivalent.

Reviews and reinforces the fundamentals of grammar and a core vocabulary from daily life. Principal emphasis is placed on further development of communicative skills (oral and written). Verbal aspect and verbs of motion receive special attention.

Spring 2019: UKRN UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 2102 001/76090 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:25am
351a International Affairs Bldg
Yuri Shevchuk 3 1/12

UKRN GU4006 Advanced Ukrainian Through Literature, Media, and Politics. 3 points.

This course is organized around a number of thematic centers or modules. Each is focused on stylistic peculiarities typical of a given functional style of the Ukrainian language. Each is designed to assist the student in acquiring an active command of lexical, grammatical, discourse, and stylistic traits that distinguish one style from the others and actively using them in real-life communicative settings in contemporary Ukraine. The styles include literary fiction, scholarly prose, and journalism, both printed and broadcast.

UKRN GU4007 Advanced Ukrainian Through Literature, Media and Politics II. 3 points.

This course is organized around a number of thematic centers or modules. Each is focused on stylistic peculiarities typical of a given functional style of the Ukrainian language. Each is designed to assist the student in acquiring an active command of lexical, grammatical, discourse, and stylistic traits that distinguish one style from the others and actively using them in real-life communicative settings in contemporary Ukraine. The styles include literary fiction, scholarly prose, and journalism, both printed and broadcast

UKRN W4037 The Aura of Soviet Ukrainian Modernism. 3 points.

This course studies the renaissance in Ukrainian culture of the 1920s - a period of revolution, experimentation, vibrant expression and polemics. Focusing on the most important developments in literature, as well as on the intellectual debates they inspired, the course will also examine the major achievements in Ukrainian theater, visual art and film as integral components of the cultural spirit that defined the era. Additionally, the course also looks at the subsequent implementation of the socialist realism and its impact on Ukrainian culture and on the cultural leaders of the renaissance. The course treats one of the most important periods of Ukrainian culture and examines it lasting impact on today's Ukraine. This period produced several world-renowned cultural figures, whose connections with the 1920s Ukraine have only recently begun to be discussed. The course will be complemented by film screenings, presentations of visual art and rare publications from this period. Entirely in English with a parallel reading list for those who read Ukrainian.

Hungarian

HNGR UN1101 Elementary Hungarian I. 4 points.

Introduction to the basic structures of the Hungarian language. Students with a schedule conflict should consult the instructor about the possibility of adjusting hours.

Fall 2019: HNGR UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HNGR 1101 001/98242 T Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Carol Rounds 4 0/20

HNGR UN1102 Elementary Hungarian II. 4 points.

Introduction to the basic structures of the Hungarian language. With the instructor's permission the second term of this course may be taken without the first. Students with a schedule conflict should consult the instructor about the possibility of adjusting hours.

Spring 2019: HNGR UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HNGR 1102 001/66542 T Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
501 Hamilton Hall
Carol Rounds 4 3/20

HNGR UN2101 Intermediate Hungarian I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: HNGR UN1101-UN1102 or the equivalent.

Further develops a student's knowledge of the Hungarian language. With the instructor's permission the second term of this course may be taken without the first. Students with a schedule conflict should consult the instructor about the possibility of adjusting hours.

Fall 2019: HNGR UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HNGR 2101 001/55101 T Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Carol Rounds 4 1/20

HNGR UN2102 Intermediate Hungarian II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: HNGR UN1101-UN1102 or the equivalent.

Further develops a student's knowledge of the Hungarian language. With the instructor's permission the second term of this course may be taken without the first. Students with a schedule conflict should consult the instructor about the possibility of adjusting hours.

Spring 2019: HNGR UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HNGR 2102 001/16087 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Carol Rounds 4 2/18
HNGR 2102 001/16087 T 8:30am - 10:00am
Room TBA
Carol Rounds 4 2/18

HNGR UN3343 Hungarian Descriptive Grammar. 3 points.

This course is designed for those curious about the structure of Hungarian - an unusual language with a complex grammar quite different from English, or, indeed, any Indo -European language. The study of Hungarian, a language of the Finno-Ugric family, offers the opportunity to learn about the phonology of vowel harmony, the syntax of topic-comment discourse, verb agreement with subjects and objects, highly developed case systems and possessive nominal paradigms. In addition to its inflectional profile, Hungarian derivation possibilities are vast, combinatory, and playful. During the semester we will touch upon all the important grammatical aspects of Hungarian and discuss them in relation to general linguistic principles and discourse, and finally, through some text analysis, see them in action. Although the primary discussion will center on Hungarian, we will draw on comparisons to other Finno-Ugric languages, most notably Finnish and Komi; students are encouraged to draw on comparisons with their own languages of interest. No prerequisite. Counts as Core Linguistics.

Spring 2019: HNGR UN3343
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HNGR 3343 001/76395 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Carol Rounds 3 6/18

Cross-Listed Courses

AFRS GU4000 Harlem and Moscow. 3 points.

Prerequisites: NA

The Russian Revolution of 1917 is widely acknowledged as a watershed moment in the global struggle for worker’s rights, but it also played a considerable role in the fights against racism and colonialism (Lenin considered both tools of capitalist exploitation). In Soviet Russia’s project to make racial equality a central feature of communism, two urban locales featured prominently: its capital city of Moscow and the burgeoning Black cultural center that was Harlem, New York. This course will explore cross-cultural encounters between Moscow and Harlem as a way to ask larger questions about race, class, and solidarity across difference. Students can expect to read novels, memoirs, and cultural reportage from Harlem Renaissance figures (Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Dorothy West) who traveled to Moscow. Students will also learn about the role of race in early Soviet culture, particularly visual culture (films, children’s media, propaganda posters, etc.). This course includes a field trip to the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem.