Slavic

http://slavic.barnard.edu/

226 Milbank Hall
212-854-5417
212-854-8266 (fax)
Department Assistant: Mary Missirian

Mission

The primary mission of the Slavic Department at Barnard is to prepare students linguistically, culturally, and academically to participate in the global community, specifically by engaging with the Slavic-speaking world.  To this end, the Department, in cooperation with its Columbia counterpart, offers instruction in five Slavic languages and literatures, with particular emphasis on Russian. The department insists upon a strong foundation in language study, because this best prepares students for future involvement with the countries of Eastern Europe and Eurasia, as well as for graduate study in the literature, anthropology, sociology, history, economics, or politics of the region, and for careers in government, business, journalism, or international law.

The department offers major tracks in Russian Language and Literature, Slavic and East European Literature and Culture, Russian Regional Studies, and Slavic and East European Regional Studies.  A minor program in Russian Literature and Culture is also available.  These programs are supported by an extensive array of courses designed to help the student obtain reasonable fluency in the spoken and written language and a reading ability adequate for interpreting texts of some difficulty in a variety of disciplines. While offering a range of courses designed to give the student a strong general background in Russian and Slavic literature, film, culture, and intellectual history, the department encourages students to supplement their knowledge by taking courses devoted to Russia, the former Soviet Union, and Eastern Europe offered in other disciplines as well. The department co-sponsors and facilitates student participation in region-related extra-curricular activities held at the Harriman Institute and the Columbia Slavic Department and also fosters student engagement with the rich cultural resources available in New York City.

Student Learning Outcomes

In recognition of the National Standards for Foreign Language Learning published by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, the Slavic Department expects the following outcomes for students in each of its major tracks:

  • Communication.  Students should be able to communicate orally and in writing in the language of study, and understand and interpret written and spoken language on a variety of topics.
  • Cultures.  Students should demonstrate an understanding of the perspectives, products, and practices of the culture studied.
  • Connections.  Students should be able to acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints available to them through the foreign language and its cultures.
  • Comparisons.  Students should develop comparative insights into the nature of language and culture as a result of studying a language and culture other than their own.
  • Communities.  Students should be prepared to participate in multilingual communities at home and around the world.

In addition, the Department expects the following outcomes of all majors:

  • Students should demonstrate broad knowledge of at least one major aspect (e.g. literature, politics, or history) of the culture studied
  • Students should acquire and convey, in an appropriate academic form, deep knowledge of a particular topic or question relating to the culture studied

Entering students should see Professor Frank Miller (708 Hamilton, 854-3941) for a placement examination: a sufficiently high grade will automatically fulfill the language requirement; other students will be placed accordingly. Native speakers of Russian or any Slavic language should consult with the department chair. The Department is a member of "Dobro Slovo" (The National Slavic Honor Society) and is pleased to induct its qualifying students into the society.

Acting Chair: Helene Foley (Professor of Classics)
Term Assistant Professor: Bradley Gorski
Adjunct Lecturers: Irina Denischenko and Vasiliy Lvov

Other officers of the University offering courses in Slavic:

Professors: Valentina Izmirlieva (CHAIR), Liza Knapp (Director, Undergraduate Studies), Cathy Popkin (Director, Graduate Studies), Irina Reyfman (Director of Undergraduate Studies), Alan Timberlake
Associate Professor:
Assistant Professors: Adam E. Leeds, Jessica E. Merrill, Alla Smyslova (Russian Language Program Director)
Lecturers: Aleksandar Boskovic, Christopher Harwood, Nataliya Kun, Mona M. Momescu, Yuri Shevchuk,

Requirements for the Major

There are four majors available to students in the department. Prospective students are encouraged to consult with a member of the faculty as early as possible in order to determine the major track and selection of courses that will best serve her background and interests.

Russian Language and Literature

Select four years of Russian: *
RUSS UN1101
 - RUSS UN1102
First-year Russian I
and First-year Russian II
10
RUSS UN1201
 - RUSS UN1202
Second-year Russian I
and
10
RUSS UN3101
 - RUSS UN3102
Third-year Russian I
and Third-Year Russian II
8
RUSS UN3332 3
RUSS W4333Fourth-year Russian I4
RUSS GU4334Fourth-year Russian II4
Select six courses in Russian Literatures to include: **
RUSS UN3220Literature and Empire: The Reign of the Novel in Russia (19th Century) [In English]3
RUSS UN3221Literature & Revolution [In English]3
At least two courses with required reading in Russian
RUSS UN3595Senior Seminar3
*

Native speakers of Russian who place out of these courses must substitute at least two courses, of which one must be RUSS UN3430 Russian for Heritage Speakers I

**

Other Russian literature courses may be substituted upon consultation with adviser. With permission of adviser one course on Russia offered in a department other than Slavic may be substituted.

Slavic and East European Literature and Culture

Completion of third-year course (or the equivalent in Czech, Polish, Serbo-Croatian, or Ukrainian language
Select six courses in literature, theatre, or film of the region, potentially including independent study courses
Select two courses in related fields (history, art history, music, etc.) to include at least one course in the history of the region
Select two semesters of senior seminar or the equivalent leading to the completion of a senior thesis

Note: A student in this major must design her program in close consultation with her adviser in order to insure intellectual, disciplinary, and regional coherence.

Russian Regional Studies

Select four years of Russian:
RUSS UN1101
 - RUSS UN1102
First-year Russian I
and First-year Russian II
10
RUSS UN1201
 - RUSS UN1202
Second-year Russian I
and
10
Select two courses in Russian or Soviet Literature (in translation or in Russian)
RUSS UN3101Third-year Russian I4
RUSS UN3102Third-Year Russian II4
RUSS W4333Fourth-year Russian I4
RUSS GU4334Fourth-year Russian II4
Select two courses in Russian History
Select one course on Russia or the Soviet Union in any discipline (history, art history, geography, sociology, economics, literature, political science, etc.)
Select one course in Soviet/post-Soviet politics
Two semesters of a senior research seminar or the equivalent in independent study with research to be conducted predominantly in Russian language sources

Note: In consultation with her adviser, a student may elect to take one or more courses devoted to a region other than Russia that is located on the territory of the former Soviet Union.

Slavic and East European Regional Studies Major-Czech, Polish, Serbo-Croatian, Ukrainian

Select three years of language study
Select two courses Literature in relevant region
Select two courses of history in relevant region
Select one course on relevant region in any discipline (history, art history, geography, sociology, economics, literature, political science, etc.)
One course on politics in relevant region
Two semester of a senior research seminar or the equivalent in independent study with research to be conducted predominantly in relevant region's language sources

Requirements for the Minor

Minor in Russian

The Minor in Russian allows students to study the language and culture of Russia at a smaller scale than a Major. A total of five courses (minimum 15 credits) beyond the second year of Russian are required. These courses should relate to the language and culture of Russia. Courses should be selected in consultation with a Slavic Department faculty member.

Minor in Czech, Polish, Serbo-Croatian or Ukrainian

A Minor in a Slavic language other than Russian allow students to pursue in-depth studies of this language and the region on a smaller scale than the one required for a Major. The Barnard Minor in Czech, Polish, Serbo-Croatian or Ukrainian consists of five courses (minimum 15 credits) beyond the second year of language study. It requires that three (3) of these courses be related to the country of the language (Poland, Czech Republic, etc) while the other two (2) should be related to the region and its cultural history more broadly.

Russian Language

RUSS UN1101 First-year Russian I. 5 points.

Grammar, reading, composition, and conversation.

Fall 2017: RUSS UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 1101 001/17926 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
709 Hamilton Hall
5 6/12
RUSS 1101 002/18272 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
709 Hamilton Hall
5 3/12
RUSS 1101 003/24192 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
709 Hamilton Hall
5 12/12
RUSS 1101 004/29872 M T W Th 6:10pm - 7:15pm
709 Hamilton Hall
5 9/12

RUSS UN1102 First-year Russian II. 5 points.

Grammar, reading, composition, and conversation.

Spring 2017: RUSS UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 1102 001/75241 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
709 Hamilton Hall
Erica Drennan 5 11/12
RUSS 1102 002/63835 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
709 Hamilton Hall
Nataliya Kun 5 9/12
RUSS 1102 004/28894 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
709 Hamilton Hall
Vera Senina 5 6/12
RUSS 1102 005/29945 M T W Th 6:10pm - 7:15pm
408 Hamilton Hall
Michael Gluck 5 3/12

RUSS UN1201 Second-year Russian I. 5 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS UN1102 or results of the Department placement test.

Drill practice in small groups. Reading, composition, and grammar review. This course number has been changed to RUSS 2101

RUSS UN2102 Second-year Russian II. 5 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS UN2101 or the equivalent.

Drill practice in small groups. Reading, composition, and grammar review.

Spring 2017: RUSS UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 2102 001/05672 M T W Th 11:45am - 12:50pm
207 Milbank Hall
Illya Kun 5 18/18
RUSS 2102 002/87397 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
402 Hamilton Hall
Serhii Tereshchenko 5 7/12
RUSS 2102 003/92298 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
707 Hamilton Hall
Jamie Bennett 5 6/12

LING UN3101 Introduction to Linguistics. 3 points.

An introduction to the study of language from a scientific perspective. The course is divided into three units: language as a system (sounds, morphology, syntax, and semantics), language in context (in space, time, and community), and language of the individual (psycholinguistics, errors, aphasia, neurology of language, and acquisition). Workload: lecture, weekly homework, and final examination. 

Fall 2017: LING UN3101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LING 3101 001/68567 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
717 Hamilton Hall
Alan Timberlake 3 86/86

RUSS UN3102 Third-Year Russian II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS UN2102 or the equivalent and the instructor's permission.

Enrollment limited. Recommended for students who wish to improve their active command of Russian. Emphasis on conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of selected texts and videotapes. Lectures. Papers and oral reports required. Conducted entirely in Russian.

Spring 2017: RUSS UN3102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3102 001/60636 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Nataliya Kun 4 8/12
RUSS 3102 002/73456 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
707 Hamilton Hall
Alla Smyslova 4 8/12

RUSS UN3430 Russian for Heritage Speakers I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS V3430 or the instructor's permission.

This course is designed to help students who speak Russian at home, but have no or limited reading and writing skills to develop literary skills in Russian. THIS COURSE, TAKEN WITH RUSS V3431, MEET A TWO YEAR FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT. Conducted in Russian.

Fall 2017: RUSS UN3430
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3430 001/28937 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Alla Smyslova 3 6/15

RUSS UN3431 Russian for Heritage Speakers II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS V3430 or the instructor's permission.

This course is designed to help students who speak Russian at home, but have no or limited reading and writing skills to develop literary skills in Russian. THIS COURSE, TAKEN WITH RUSS V3430, MEET A TWO YEAR FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT. Conducted in Russian.

Spring 2017: RUSS UN3431
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3431 001/23478 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
607 Hamilton Hall
Alla Smyslova 3 11/15

RUSS GU4333 Fourth-year Russian I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Three years of college Russian and the instructor's permission.

Systematic study of problems in Russian syntax; written exercises, translations into Russian, and compositions. Conducted entirely in Russian.

RUSS GU4334 Fourth-year Russian II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: three years of college Russian and the instructor's permission.

Discussion of different styles and levels of language, including word usage and idiomatic expression; written exercises, analysis of texts, and compositions. Conducted entirely in Russian.

RUSS GU4350 Moving to Advanced-Plus: Language, Culture, Society in Russian Today. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Six semesters of college Russian and the instructor’s permission.

The course is designed to provide advanced and highly-motivated undergraduate and graduate students of various majors with an opportunity to develop professional vocabulary and discourse devices that will help them to discuss their professional fields in Russian with fluency and accuracy. The course targets all four language competencies: speaking, listening, reading and writing, as well as cultural understanding. Conducted in Russian.

Fall 2017: RUSS GU4350
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 4350 001/26623 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
707 Hamilton Hall
Alla Smyslova 3 6/15

RUSS GU4910 Literary Translation. 4 points.

Prerequisites: four years of college Russian or the equivalent.

Workshop in literary translation from Russian into English focusing on the practical problems of the craft. Each student submits a translation of a literary text for group study and criticism. The aim is to produce translations of publishable quality.

Fall 2017: RUSS GU4910
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 4910 001/27735 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Ronald Meyer 4 6/12

 Russian Literature and Culture (in English)

RUSS UN3220 Literature and Empire: The Reign of the Novel in Russia (19th Century) [In English]. 3 points.

Explores the aesthetic and formal developments in Russian prose, especially the rise of the monumental 19th-century novel, as one manifestation of a complex array of national and cultural aspirations, humanistic and imperialist ones alike. Works by Pushkin, Lermonotov, Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov. Knowledge of Russian not required.

Fall 2017: RUSS UN3220
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3220 001/65562 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
303 Hamilton Hall
Cathy Popkin 3 20/40

CLRS GU4037 The Russian American Experience. 3 points.

In recent decades, Russian immigrant identity has changed. Immigrants and children of immigrants are much more involved with their home country. Fiction by Russian-speaking writers shows and also establishes relationship to geographies of their birth, usually Soviet successor nations such as Russia. The focus of this class is an analysis of works by Russian-speaking writers, filmmakers, and artists who create and also trace deepening forms of dialogue between the former Soviet Republics and North America.

Spring 2017: CLRS GU4037
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLRS 4037 001/97098 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
511 Hamilton Hall
Anna Katsnelson 3 4/25
Fall 2017: CLRS GU4037
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLRS 4037 001/88014 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
1201 International Affairs Bldg
Anna Katsnelson 3 2/25

Russian Literature and Culture (in Russian)

RUSS V3319 Masterpieces of 19th Century Russian Literature. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A close study, in the original, of representative works by Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Ostrovsky, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, leskov, and Chekhov.

RUSS V3320 Masterpieces of 20th-Century Russian Literature. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: native or near-native knowledge of Russian and the instructor's permission.

Close study, in the original, of representative works by Bely, Sologub, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Olesha, Mandel'stam, Akhmatova, Solzhenitsyn, Terts, and Brodsky.

RUSS V3332 Vvedenie v russkuiu literaturu: Scary Stories. 3 points.

For non-native speakers of Russian.

Prerequisites: two years of college Russian or the instructor's permission.

The course is devoted to the reading, analysis, and discussion of a number of Russian prose fiction works from the eighteenth to twentieth century. Its purpose is to give students an opportunity to apply their language skills to literature. It will teach students to read Russian literary texts as well as to talk and write about them. Its goal is, thus, twofold: to improve the students' linguistic skills and to introduce them to Russian literature and literary history. A close study in the original of the "scary stories" in Russian literature from the late eighteenth century. Conducted in Russian.

RUSS V3997 Supervised Individual Research. 2-4 points.

Prerequisites: Open to senior majors, and permission of the instructor.

Supervised research culminating in a critical paper.

RUSS W4014 Introduction to Russian Poetry and Poetics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An introduction to Russian poetry, through the study of selected texts of major poets of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, primarily: Pushkin, Lermontov, Pavlova, Tiutchev, Blok, Mandel'shtam, Akhmatova, Mayakovsky, Prigov and Brodsky. Classes devoted to the output of a single poet will be interspersed with classes that draw together the poems of different poets in order to show the reflexivity of the Russian poetic canon. These classes will be organized according either to types of poems or to shared themes. The course will teach the basics of verisification, poetic languages (sounds, tropes), and poetic forms. Classes in English; poetry read in Russian.

RUSS W4200 Russian Theatre--Hands On. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Three years of college Russian and permission of the instructor.
The study and staging in the original of a Russian play. Detailed textual analysis, including character development, dramatic style, and language usage. Oral presentations and recitations with focus on pronunciation and intonation

RUSS W4331 Chteniia po russkoi literaturu: Turgenev. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course is devoted to reading shorter prose works by Ivan Turgenev. The reading list includes stories from his collection Sketches of a Hunter as well as such masterpieces as The Diary of a Superfluous Man, First Love, and Asia. Classes are conducted entirely in Russian.

RUSS W4332 Chteniia po russkoi literaturu: Gogol. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course is devoted to reading shorter works by Nikolai Gogol, The syllabus includes selections from his collection Sketches of a Hunter as well as such masterpieces as the Diary of a Superfluous Man, First Love, and Asia. Classes are conducted entirely in Russian.

RUSS W4338 Chteniia po russkoi literature: Voina i mir. 3 points.

The course is devoted to reading and discussing of Tolstoy's masterpiece. Classes are conducted entirely in Russian.

RUSS W4339 Chteniia po russkoi literature: Pushkin. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: three years of college Russian and the instructor's permission.

A survey of Alexander Pushkin's poetry and prose in the original. Emphasis on the emergence of a new figure of the Poet in Russin in the 1820-1830s. Linguistic analysis of the poetic texts (vocabulary, metrics, versification) will be combined with the study of Russian History and Culture as reflected in Pushkin's writings.

RUSS GU4344 Chteniia po russkoi kul'ture: Advanced Russian Through History. 3 points.

Prerequisites: three years of college Russian or the equivalent.

A language course designed to meet the needs of those foreign learners of Russian as well as heritage speakers who want to develop further their reading, speaking, and writing skills and be introduced to the history of Russia.

Fall 2017: RUSS GU4344
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 4344 001/22945 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Vasily Lvov 3 3/15

RUSS W4346 Chteniia po russkoi kul'ture: Russian Folklore and the Folkloric Tradition. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The purpose of this course is to acquaint structure with traditional folk beliefs that are part of Russian life today. Readings will include descriptions of character ritual folk beliefs as well as narratives about personal experiences concerning superstition, sorcery and the supernatural. Also included will be folktales that most Russians know and contemporary Russian folk narratives.

RUSS W4348 Chteniia po russkoi kul'ture: Advanced Russian Through the Media. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: three years of college Russian or the equivalent.

This course is designed to meet the needs of advanced students of Russian across several fields - the humanities, social sciences, law, arts, and others - who want to further develop their speech, comprehension, reading, and writing and be introduced to the contemporary Russian media. This addition to our series of courses in Advanced Russian through cultural content provides training for research and professional work in Russian.

RUSS W4349 Chteniia po russkoi kul'ture: Advanced Russian Through Song. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: three years of college Russian or the equivalent.

This is a content-based language course that is designed to develop students' ability to understand fluent Russian speech and express their opinions on various social and cultural topics in both oral and written form.

Czech Language and Literature

CZCH UN1201 Intermediate Czech I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: CZCH W1102 or the equivalent.

Rapid review of grammar. Readings in contemporary fiction and nonfiction, depending upon the interests of individual students. This course number is being changed to CZCH 2101

CZCH GU4333 Readings in Czech Literature, I. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Prerequisites: two years of college Czech or the equivalent.

A close study in the original of representative works of Czech literature. Discussion and writing assignments in Czech aimed at developing advanced language proficiency.

Fall 2017: CZCH GU4333
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CZCH 4333 001/10823 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Christopher Harwood 3 0/12

CZCH GU4334 Readings in Czech Literature, II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: two years of college Czech or the equivalent.

A close study in the original of representative works of Czech literature. Discussion and writing assignments in Czech aimed at developing advanced language proficiency.

Spring 2017: CZCH GU4334
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CZCH 4334 001/67008 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
408 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Harwood 3 0/10

CZCH UN1101 Elementary Czech I. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepare students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Fall 2017: CZCH UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CZCH 1101 001/70275 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
406 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Harwood 4 2/12

CZCH UN1102 Elementary Czech II. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepare students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Spring 2017: CZCH UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CZCH 1102 001/60303 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
406 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Harwood 4 1/20

CZCH UN2101 Intermediate Czech I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: CZCH UN1102 or the equivalent

Rapid review of grammar. Readings in contemporary fiction and nonfiction, depending upon the interests of individual students.

Fall 2017: CZCH UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CZCH 2101 001/12417 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Harwood 4 1/12

CZCH UN2102 Intermediate Czech II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: CZCH UN1102 or the equivalent.

Rapid review of grammar. Readings in contemporary fiction and nonfiction, depending upon the interests of individual students.

CLCZ GU4030 Postwar Czech Literature [in English]. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A survey of postwar Czech fiction and drama. Knowledge of Czech not necessary. Parallel reading lists available in translation and in the original.

Fall 2017: CLCZ GU4030
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLCZ 4030 001/15375 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
408 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Harwood 3 3/18

CLCZ GU4038 Prague Spring of '68 in Film and Literature [In English]. 3 points.

The course explores the unique period in Czech film and literature during the 1960s that emerged as a reaction to the imposed socialist realism. The new generation of writers (Kundera, Skvorecky, Havel, Hrabal) in turn had an influence on young emerging film makers, all of whom were part of the Czech new wave.

Spring 2017: CLCZ GU4038
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLCZ 4038 001/12870 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Harwood 3 7/25

Polish Language and Literature

POLI UN1201 Intermediate Polish I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLI W1102 or the equivalent.

Rapid review of grammar; readings in contemporary nonfiction or fiction, depending on the interests of individual students. This course number is being changed to POLI 2101

POLI UN1101 Elementary Polish I. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Fall 2017: POLI UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 1101 001/23502 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Caes 4 6/12

POLI UN1102 Elementary Polish II. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Spring 2017: POLI UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 1102 001/24236 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
255 International Affairs Bldg
Christopher Caes 4 8/15

POLI UN2101 Intermediate Polish I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLI UN1102 or the equivalent.

Rapid review of grammar; readings in contemporary nonfiction or fiction, depending on the interests of individual students.

Fall 2017: POLI UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 2101 001/62997 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
408 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Caes 4 5/12

POLI UN2102 Intermediate Polish II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLI UN1102 or the equivalent.

Rapid review of grammar; readings in contemporary nonfiction or fiction, depending on the interests of individual students.

POLI GU4101 Advanced Polish I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: two years of college Polish or the instructor's permission.

Extensive readings from 19th- and 20th-century texts in the original. Both fiction and nonfiction, with emphasis depending on the interests and needs of individual students.

Fall 2017: POLI GU4101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 4101 001/10750 M W F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
716a Hamilton Hall
Christopher Caes 4 1/12

POLI GU4102 Advanced Polish II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: two years of college Polish or the instructor's permission.

Extensive readings from 19th- and 20th-century texts in the original. Both fiction and nonfiction, with emphasis depending on the interests and needs of individual students.

Spring 2017: POLI GU4102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 4102 001/65624 M W F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
716a Hamilton Hall
Christopher Caes 4 4/18

POLI G4049 Twentieth Century Polish Poetry. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: reading proficiency in Polish.

Students will be able to learn about the Polish literary scene and its dynamics and most of all read and analyze the most representative texts of the particular poets. The main goal of this course will be reading and comprehension of the text in original.

Serbian/Croatian/Bosnian Language and Literature

BCRS UN1201 Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BCRS W1102 or the equivalent.

Readings in Serbian/Croatian/Bosnian literature in the original, with emphasis depending upon the needs of individual students. This course number is being changed to BCRS 2101

BCRS UN1101 Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Fall 2017: BCRS UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 1101 001/61317 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Milica Ilicic 4 1/12

BCRS UN1102 Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Spring 2017: BCRS UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 1102 001/28675 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
352c International Affairs Bldg
Aleksandar Boskovic 4 8/12

BCRS UN2101 Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BCRS UN1102 or the equivalent.

Readings in Serbian/Croatian/Bosnian literature in the original, with emphasis depending upon the needs of individual students.

Fall 2017: BCRS UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 2101 001/22615 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Aleksandar Boskovic 3 5/12

BCRS UN2102 Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BCRS UN1102 or the equivalent.

Readings in Serbian/Croatian/Bosnian literature in the original, with emphasis depending upon the needs of individual students. This course number has been changed to BCRS 2102

Spring 2017: BCRS UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 2102 001/86347 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
352b International Affairs Bldg
Aleksandar Boskovic 3 5/12

BCRS GU4331 Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BCRS UN2102

Further develops skills in speaking, reading, and writing, using essays, short stories, films, and fragments of larger works. Reinforces basic grammar and introduces more complete structures.

Fall 2017: BCRS GU4331
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 4331 001/75054 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Aleksandar Boskovic 3 3/12

BCRS GU4332 Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BCRS UN2102

Further develops skills in speaking, reading, and writing, using essays, short stories, films, and fragments of larger works. Reinforces basic grammar and introduces more complete structures.

Spring 2017: BCRS GU4332
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 4332 001/11029 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
718 Hamilton Hall
Aleksandar Boskovic 3 1/12

Ukrainian Language and Literature

UKRN UN1101 Elementary Ukrainian I. 3 points.

Designed for students with little or no knowledge of Ukrainian. Basic grammar structures are introduced and reinforced, with equal emphasis on developing oral and written communication skills. Specific attention to acquisition of high-frequency vocabulary and its optimal use in real-life settings.

Fall 2017: UKRN UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 1101 001/13786 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Yuri Shevchuk 3 0/12

UKRN GU4037 The Aura of Soviet Ukrainian Modernism. 3 points.

This course studies the renaissance in Ukrainian culture of the 1920s - a period of revolution, experimentation, vibrant expression and polemics. Focusing on the most important developments in literature, as well as on the intellectual debates they inspired, the course will also examine the major achievements in Ukrainian theater, visual art and film as integral components of the cultural spirit that defined the era. Additionally, the course also looks at the subsequent implementation of the socialist realism and its impact on Ukrainian culture and on the cultural leaders of the renaissance. The course treats one of the most important periods of Ukrainian culture and examines it lasting impact on today's Ukraine. This period produced several world-renowned cultural figures, whose connections with the 1920s Ukraine have only recently begun to be discussed. The course will be complemented by film screenings, presentations of visual art and rare publications from this period. Entirely in English with a parallel reading list for those who read Ukrainian.

Spring 2017: UKRN GU4037
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 4037 001/71360 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Mark Andryczyk 3 1/12

CLSL GU4075 Soviet and Post-Soviet, Colonial and Post Colonial Film. 3 points.

The course will discuss how filmmaking has been used as an instrument of power and imperial domination in the Soviet Union as well as on post-Soviet space since 1991. A body of selected films by Soviet and post-Soviet directors which exemplify the function of filmmaking as a tool of appropriation of the colonized, their cultural and political subordination by the Soviet center will be examined in terms of postcolonial theories. The course will focus both on Russian cinema and often overlooked work of Ukrainian, Georgian, Belarusian, Armenian, etc. national film schools and how they participated in the communist project of fostering a «new historic community of the Soviet people» as well as resisted it by generating, in hidden and, since 1991, overt and increasingly assertive ways their own counter-narratives. Close attention will be paid to the new Russian film as it re-invents itself within the post-Soviet imperial momentum projected on the former Soviet colonies.

Spring 2017: CLSL GU4075
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLSL 4075 001/79782 T 6:10pm - 10:00pm
407 Hamilton Hall
Yuri Shevchuk 3 5/18
Fall 2017: CLSL GU4075
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLSL 4075 001/61953 T 6:10pm - 10:00pm
707 Hamilton Hall
Yuri Shevchuk 3 10/18

UKRN UN1102 Elementary Ukrainian II. 3 points.

Designed for students with little or no knowledge of Ukrainian. Basic grammar structures are introduced and reinforced, with equal emphasis on developing oral and written communication skills. Specific attention to acquisition of high-frequency vocabulary and its optimal use in real-life settings.

Spring 2017: UKRN UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 1102 001/12392 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
351a International Affairs Bldg
Yuri Shevchuk 3 2/15

UKRN UN2101 Intermediate Ukrainian I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: UKRN UN1102 or the equivalent.

Reviews and reinforces the fundamentals of grammar and a core vocabulary from daily life. Principal emphasis is placed on further development of communicative skills (oral and written). Verbal aspect and verbs of motion receive special attention.

Fall 2017: UKRN UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 2101 001/67418 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Yuri Shevchuk 3 2/12

UKRN UN2102 Intermediate Ukrainian II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: UKRN UN1102 or the equivalent.

Reviews and reinforces the fundamentals of grammar and a core vocabulary from daily life. Principal emphasis is placed on further development of communicative skills (oral and written). Verbal aspect and verbs of motion receive special attention.

Spring 2017: UKRN UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 2102 001/96946 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
351a International Affairs Bldg
Yuri Shevchuk 3 0/20

UKRN UN4001 Advanced Ukrainian I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: UKRN W2102 or the equivalent.

The course is for students who wish to develop their mastery of Ukrainian. Further study of grammar includes patterns of word formation, participles, gerunds, declension of numerals, and a more in-depth study of difficult subjects, such as verbal aspect and verbs of motion. The material is drawn from classical and contemporary Ukrainian literature, press, electronic media, and film. Taught almost exclusively in Ukrainian.

Fall 2017: UKRN UN4001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 4001 001/73424 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Yuri Shevchuk 3 0/12

UKRN GU4002 Advanced Ukrainian II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: UKRN UN2102 or the equivalent.

The course is for students who wish to develop their mastery of Ukrainian. Further study of grammar includes patterns of word formation, participles, gerunds, declension of numerals, and a more in-depth study of difficult subjects, such as verbal aspect and verbs of motion. The material is drawn from classical and contemporary Ukrainian literature, press, electronic media, and film. Taught almost exclusively in Ukrainian.

Spring 2017: UKRN GU4002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 4002 001/21528 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
709 Hamilton Hall
Yuri Shevchuk 3 0/20

Film

HNGR UN3343 Hungarian Descriptive Grammar. 3 points.

This course is designed for those curious about the structure of Hungarian - an unusual language with a complex grammar quite different from English, or, indeed, any Indo -European language. The study of Hungarian, a language of the Finno-Ugric family, offers the opportunity to learn about the phonology of vowel harmony, the syntax of topic-comment discourse, verb agreement with subjects and objects, highly developed case systems and possessive nominal paradigms. In addition to its inflectional profile, Hungarian derivation possibilities are vast, combinatory, and playful. During the semester we will touch upon all the important grammatical aspects of Hungarian and discuss them in relation to general linguistic principles and discourse, and finally, through some text analysis, see them in action. Although the primary discussion will center on Hungarian, we will draw on comparisons to other Finno-Ugric languages, most notably Finnish and Komi; students are encouraged to draw on comparisons with their own languages of interest. No prerequisite. Counts as Core Linguistics.

Spring 2017: HNGR UN3343
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HNGR 3343 001/19894 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
309 Hamilton Hall
Carol Rounds 3 7/18

HNGR UN1101 Elementary Hungarian I. 4 points.

Introduction to the basic structures of the Hungarian language. Students with a schedule conflict should consult the instructor about the possibility of adjusting hours.

Fall 2017: HNGR UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HNGR 1101 001/77372 T Th 9:10am - 11:00am
501 Hamilton Hall
Carol Rounds 4 2/20

HNGR UN1102 Elementary Hungarian II. 4 points.

Introduction to the basic structures of the Hungarian language. With the instructor's permission the second term of this course may be taken without the first. Students with a schedule conflict should consult the instructor about the possibility of adjusting hours.

Spring 2017: HNGR UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HNGR 1102 001/65819 T Th 9:00am - 10:50am
352c International Affairs Bldg
Carol Rounds, Stephane Charitos 4 3/20

HNGR UN1201 Intermediate Hungarian I. 4 points.

Further develops a student's knowledge of the Hungarian language. Students with a schedule conflict should consult the instructor about the possibility of adjusting hours.

Fall 2017: HNGR UN1201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HNGR 1201 001/18235 T Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Carol Rounds, Stephane Charitos 4 0/16

HNGR UN2102 Intermediate Hungarian II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: HNGR W1101-W1102 or the equivalent.

Further develops a student's knowledge of the Hungarian language. With the instructor's permission the second term of this course may be taken without the first. Students with a schedule conflict should consult the instructor about the possibility of adjusting hours.

Spring 2017: HNGR UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HNGR 2102 001/23268 T Th 12:00pm - 1:50pm
501 Hamilton Hall
Carol Rounds 4 2/18

HNGR GU4028 Modern Hungarian Prose in Translation: Exposing Naked Reality. 3 points.

This course introduces students to representative examples of an essentially robust, reality-bound, socially aware literature. In modern Hungarian prose fiction, the tradition of nineteenth-century "anecdotal realism" remained strong and was further enlivened by various forms of naturalism. Even turn-of-the century and early twentieth-century modernist fiction is characterized by strong narrative focus, psychological realism, and an emphasis on social conditions and local color. During the tumultuous decades of the century, social, political, national issues preoccupied even aesthetics-conscious experimenters and ivory-tower dwellers. Among the topics discussed will be "populist" and "urban" literature in the interwar years, post-1945 reality in fiction, literary memoirs and reportage, as well as late-century minimalist and postmodern trends.

Fall 2017: HNGR GU4028
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HNGR 4028 001/19782 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Ivan Sanders 3 3/12

Linguistics

Comparative Literature Slavic

CLCZ W4020 Czech Culture Before Czechoslovakia. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: sophomore standing or the instructor's permission.

An interpretive cultural history of the Czechs from earliest times to the founding of the first Czechoslovak republic in 1918. Emphasis on the origins, decline, and resurgence of Czech national identity as reflected in the visual arts, architecture, music, historiography, and especially the literature of the Czechs.

CLCZ W4035 The Writers of Prague. 3 points.

A survey of the Czech, German, and German-Jewish literary cultures of Prague from 1910 to 1920. Special attention to Hašek, ÄŒapek, Kafka, Werfel, and Rilke. Parallel reading lists available in English and in the original.

CLPL W4120 The Polish Short Story in a Comparitive Context. 3 points.

CLRS V3224 Nabokov. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines the writing (including major novels, short stories, essays and memoirs) of the Russian-American author Vladimir Nabokov. Special attention to literary politics and gamesmanship and the author's unique place within both the Russian and Anglo-American literary traditions. Knowledge of Russian not required.

CLRS V3300 Four Quixotes. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The critics who dislike Don Quixote the novel far outnumber those who dislike Don Quixote the character. Some cast doubt on Cervantes as a literary craftsman, questioning the degree of prescience and self-consciousness that seems to make this seventeenth-century work "modern." The Philosopher and writer Miguel de Unamuno is the standard-bearer for those who argue that it is the character of Don Quixote - rather than author's writing style - that has made this work so fruitful. The classic translator of Cervantes into English, Samuel Putman, follows suit, citing the novel's myriad of mistakes and incongruities as evidence that its success is based on Don Quixote's charms. Even the most scathing Cervantes critic, Vladimir Nabokov, who found the novel "cruel and crude." found Don himself sympathetic.

CLRS V3301 Angry Young Decade: 1955 - 1965 In Russia, Poland, USA & England. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course will consider the literature and film of Russia, Poland, the USA and England during 1955-1965, focusing specifically on the phenomenon of literary movements of angry young writers rebelling against a stagnant tradition. We will also read various autobiographical accounts from writers who explain, from their insider’s view, how the various movements started, how they influenced each other, and why and how they came to an end. The primary goal of this course is to acquaint students with literature they most likely have never encountered, and with films they may never have seen before, but which are essential components in the development of prose and cinema not only in the four countries of our studies, but across borders, oceans, and even decades.

CLRS V3302 Fairy Tales Reloaded: Witches, Werewolves, Fools, and Post-Modern Fiction. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines eastern European fairy tales against the background of western narrative traditions, and explores the role of this genre in postmodern literature. In the first half of the course we read fairy tales, paying close attention to internal structural relationships and their overall aesthetic, including their peculiar relationship to time, play with language, and openness to variation. In the second half we focus on the tales' contemporary reincarnations, and discuss why these stories become a particularly powerful medium for exploring central topics in postmodern fiction, such as representations of sex and violence.

CLRS W4011 Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and the English Novel [in English]. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

A close reading of works by Dostoevsky (Netochka Nezvanova; The Idiot; "A Gentle Creature") and Tolstoy (Childhood, Boyhood, Youth; "Family Happiness"; Anna Karenina; "The Kreutzer Sonata") in conjunction with related English novels (Bronte's Jane Eyre, Eliot's Middlemarch, Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway). No knowledge of Russian is required.

CLSL G4015 The Discovery of Language: Kant, von Humboldt, and the Consequences of the Birth of Linguistics. 3 points.

The course combines the history of literature and the philosophy of language, examining the profound effect of the emergence of language as an object of study in its own right across the whole spectrum of European culture. In education, it was implicated in the rise of nationalism; in Romanticism it contributed to the preoccupation with alienation; a new sense of language's otherness created challenges for all sectors claiming special intimacy with The Truth (natural sciences, theology and law)-- a development that has consequences for the rise of Modernism's predilection for the abstract. Readings in linguistics, neuroscience, the philosophy of language, and literary texts ( Bacon, Wilkins,Swift, Rousseau, Kant, Herder, von Humboldt, Kleist, Saussure, Kacevskii, Jacobson, Trubestskoi, Prague Circle, Tartu School, Bakhtin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Khlebnikov, Kharms, Benjamin, Cassierer, Benvenist, Derrida, de Man, Mallarme, Kafka, Sartre, Robbe-Grillet).

CLRS W4190 Race, Ethnicity, and Narrative, in the Russian/Soviet Empire. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines the literary construction of ethnic and cultural identity in texts drawn from the literatures of ethnic minorities and non-Slavic nationalities that coexist within the Russian and Soviet imperial space, with attention to the historical and political context in which literary discourses surrounding racial, ethnic, and cultural particularity develop. Organized around three major regions -- the Caucasus, Central Asia, and the Russian Far East --readings include canonical "classics" by Aitmatov, Iskander, and Rytkheu as well as less-known texts, both "official" and censored. 

CLRS W4431 Theatricality and Spectacle in the History of Russian Culture. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A survey of Russian Cultural History from the late 17th Century to the present day, focused on the problems of Theater and Performance, their place in the system of power and in the structure of everyday life. Alongside with the history of Russian Theater, various manifestations of theatricality, from the 18th century Court Festivals to the Moscow Olympiad of 1980, will be studied. Readings will include milestones of Russian drama (plays by Pushkin, Gogol, Ostrovski, Chekhov, Bulgakov), theater manifestos by Stanislavski, Meierhold, Evreinov , as well as selected issues in contemporary cultural, architectural and visual theory (works by R. Barthes, M. Carlson, A.Vidler, M. Fried). All readings will be in English.

CLSL W4004 Introduction to Twentieth-Century Central European Fiction. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course introduces students to works of literature that offer a unique perspective on the tempestuous twentieth century, if only because these works for the most part were written in "minor" languages (Czech, Polish, Hungarian, Serbian), in countries long considered part of the European backwaters, whose people were not makers but victims of history. Yet the authors of many of these works are today ranked among the masters of modern literature. Often hailing from highly stratisfied , conservative societies, many Eastern and Central European writers became daring literary innovators and experimenters. To the present day, writers from this "other" Europe try to escape history, official cultures, politics, and end up redefining them for their readers. We will be dealing with a disparate body of literature, varied both in form and content. But we will try to pinpoint subtle similarities, in tone and sensibility, and focus, too, on the more apparent preoccupation with certain themes that may be called characteristically Central European.

CLSL W4995 Central European Jewish Literature: Assimilation and Its Discontents. 3 points.

Examines prose and poetry by writers generally less accessible to the American student written in the major Central European languages: German, Hungarian, Czech, and Polish. The problematics of assimilation, the search for identity, political commitment and disillusionment are major themes, along with the defining experience of the century: the Holocaust; but because these writers are often more removed from their Jewishness, their perspective on these events and issues may be different. The influence of Franz Kafka on Central European writers, the post-Communist Jewish revival, defining the Jewish voice in an otherwise disparate body of works.

CLCV W4100 The Handwritten Book. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

How books were made in Antiquity and the Middle Ages, covering the physical characteristics of handwritten books (scripts, illustrations and illuminations, bindings, writing materials), the context in which books were created (monastic scriptorium, cathedral library, the early bookshops), and the audience which determined their use and contents.

CPLT BC3001 Introduction to Comparative Literature. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Introduction to the study of literature from a comparative and cross-disciplinary perspective. Readings will be selected to promote reflection on such topics as the relation of literature to the other arts; nationalism and literature; international literary movements; post-colonial literature; gender and literature; and issues of authorship, influence, originality, and intertextuality.

Fall 2017: CPLT BC3001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CPLT 3001 001/02326 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Emily Sun 3 24

SLLT W4015 Ideology, History, Identity: South Slavic Writers from Modernism to Postmodernism and Beyond. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Explores the issue of Yugoslav identity through the representative texts of major Serbian writers, such as Milos Crnjanski, Ivo Andric, Danilo Kis, Milorad Pavic, and Borislav Pekic.

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