Music

http://music.barnard.edu/

Barnard College Department of Music
319 Milbank Hall
212-854-5096
Columbia University Department of Music
621 Dodge Hall
212-854-3825
Department  Assistant: Mary Missirian

Mission

The Barnard Music Program provides the vocal program for the university, which includes the Barnard-Columbia Chorus and Chamber Choir, solo studio voice lessons and two levels of limited-enrollment vocal classes, Technique in Singing, and the Vocal Repertoire Class. In addition, the program provides a music history course, Introduction to Music, which is a year-long survey of Western European art music, from sixth-century Gregorian Chant to the work of living composers. The course fulfills the Fine and Performing Arts requirement of the General Education Requirements and also serves as a pre-requisite for the music major. Students may complete a senior project in music repertoire by presenting an hour-long recital, or may write a fifty-page thesis project in music research. The successful student will gain professional level performance skills though studio lessons and the theory and ear training sequence, and gain a comprehensive knowledge of music history from the courses in historical musicology and ethnomusicology provided by the Music Department at Columbia University.

Student Learning Outcomes

Students who successfully graduate with a major in music will be able to attain the following outcomes:

  1. Analyze the harmonic structure of art music and identify schools of composition by historic period and nationality;
  2. Read music at sight at the keyboard, with their instrument, or sight sing representative excerpts from all periods of Western European art music;
  3. Perform at a professional level vocally or instrumentally;
  4. Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of the diversity of style, musical period and mastery of the representative literature for voice or instrument.
  5. Apply knowledge of musical theories, traditions and periods to the study of the major;
  6. Communicate effectively orally and in writing;
  7. Explain the theoretical concepts and organizational principles, harmony, pitch, and rhythm of both non-Western and Western art music.

Director: Gail Archer, Professor of Professional Practice

Other officers of the University offering courses listed below:

Professors: Joseph Dubiel, Walter Frisch, Brad Garton, Ellie Hisama, Fred Lerdahl, George Lewis, Elaine Sisman, John Szwed
Associate Professors: Susan Boynton, Aaron Fox, Giuseppe Gerbino, Ana Maria Ochnoa, Christopher J. Washburne
Assistant Professors: Ellen Gray, Karen Henson
Lecturers: Deborah Bradley-Kramer, Jeffrey Milarsky
Director of Music Performance: Magdalena Stern- Baczewska
BC Adjunct Professor: Kristy Barbacane, Lauren Ninoshvili
BC Music Associates: Jean-Paul Björlin, Harolyn Blackwell, Spiro Malas, Jane McMahan, Josephine Mongiardo, Robert Osborne
CU Associates: Sarah Adams, Elliot Bailen, Allen Blustine, Vicki Bodner, Yari Bond, Ricardo Calleo, Marco Cappelli, Kenneth Cooper, Wayne DuMaine, Mark Goldberg, Yelena Grinberg, June Han, Dan Hayward, Robert Ingliss, Sue Anne Kahn, Kyu-Young Kim, Lisa Kim, Min-Young Kim, Arthur Kampela, David Krauss, Nina Lee, Bin Love, Spiro Malas, Jeremy McCoy, Jeff Milarsky, Mary Monroe, Rosamund Morley, Ah-Ling Neu, Tara O’Connor, Neils Ostbye, Muneko Otani, Susan Palma-Nidel, Stewart Raymond, Pablo Rieppi, Richard Rood, Susan Rotholz, Michael Skelly, Wendy Sutter, Scott Temple, Jessica Thompson, Reiko Uchida, Ben Waltzer, Michael Whitcombe, Steve Williamson, James Wilson, Sarah Wolfson

Requirements for the Music Major

Program of Study: To be planned with the department consultant before the end of the sophomore year. Prospective music majors should complete the prerequisites by the end of their sophomore year and are encouraged to complete them by the end of their first year. By the end of her first year as a music major, the student should select a faculty adviser.

Prerequisite: MUSI BC1001 An Introduction to Music I or MUSI BC1002 An Introduction to Music II, MUSI UN1002 Fundamentals of Music, and MUSI UN1312 Introductory Ear Training. Prospective music majors are advised to satisfy the prerequisites prior to their declaration as majors or before the end of their sophomore year. This requirement may be fulfilled either through successful completion of the courses or satisfactory performance on examinations administered each semester by the department.

Courses: At least 40 points, including MUSI UN2318 Music Theory I - MUSI UN2319 Music Theory II; MUSI UN3321 Music Theory III - MUSI UN3322 Music Theory IV; four semesters of ear training, unless the student is exempt by exam; the following two history courses: MUSI UN3128 History of Western Music I: Middle Ages To Baroque and MUSI UN3129 History of Western Music II: Classical To the 20th Century; and at least three 3000- or 4000-level electives in her area of interest (theory, history, composition, or ethnomusicology). The remaining points are chosen from 2000- to 4000-levels. No more than 6 points of 2000-level courses and no more than 4 points of instrumental or vocal lessons will count toward the major.

Senior Project: In the fall semester of the senior year, a major must enroll in MUSI BC3992 Senior Seminar for Music Majors in which she will write a paper which deals with primary sources. In the spring semester of the senior year, a student will either work with her adviser to expand the paper written in the senior seminar by taking MUSI BC3990 Senior Project: Senior Research, or she will take MUSI BC3991 Senior Project: Music Repertoire and prepare an hour-long vocal or instrumental recital, or compose an original composition.

Keyboard Proficiency: Music majors will be required to take a keyboard proficiency exam, which must be arranged by making an appointment with a member of the piano faculty, immediately upon declaration of the major. Those who do not pass the exam will be required to take MUSI W1517 Keyboard Harmony and Musicianship - MUSI UN1518 Keyboard Harmony and Musicianship, for 1 point each term, which will count against the maximum 4 points allowed toward completion of the major.

Languages: For students who plan to do graduate work in music, the study of German, French, Italian, and/or Latin is recommended.

Note: With the permission of Gail Archer, Barnard Director, students may take lessons at the Manhattan School of Music or the Julliard School. For non-majors, there is a six semester limit, but majors may continue for the remainder of their program.

Practice Rooms: Piano practice rooms are available, at a nominal fee, upon application to the Music Department in 319 Milbank. Application should be made during the first week of classes. Preference in assigning hours is given to students taking piano instruction, majors, and concentrators, in order of application. The organ studio in St. Paul's Chapel is available for organ practice. Arrangements should be made with Mary Monroe, Associate in Organ Performance, during the first week of classes.

Requirements for Ethnomusicology Track in the Music Major

The ethnomusicology track combines the social science of music in such courses as the Social Science of Music and Asian Music Humanities, together with anthropology as a regular option for all students.  All  special majors in ethnomusicology must take two courses in anthropology at the recommendation  of the Barnard anthropology department in consultation with ethnomusicology faculty at Columbia.

Courses for an ethnomusicology track in the music major

Pre-requisite: One semester of Introduction to Music MUSI BC1001 An Introduction to Music I or MUSI BC1002 An Introduction to Music II

MUSI UN2314Ear Training, I1
MUSI UN2315Ear Training, II1
MUSI UN2318Music Theory I3
MUSI UN2319Music Theory II3
MUSI V3420The Social Science of Music3
Up to 4 performance credits (lessons or ensembles)4
One 3000-level wester music history course3
One Asian Humanities-Music (AHMM) course3
Three ethnomusicology electives, one at the 2000-level and the other from the upper division electives9
Two courses in Anthropology, one at the introduction to cultural anthropology level; the other, an elective6
Ethnographic thesis of 30-40 pages, developed over the senior year6

Requirements for the Minor

4 Terms of Theory

MUSI UN2318 Music Theory I  MUSI UN2319 Music Theory II

MUSI UN3321 Music Theory III  MUSI UN3322 Music Theory IV

4 Terms of Ear-Training (unless student is exempt by exam)

MUSI UN2314 Ear Training, I  MUSI UN2315 Ear Training, II

MUSI UN3316 Ear Training, III  MUSI UN3317 Ear Training, IV

2 Terms of History

MUSI UN3128 History of Western Music I: Middle Ages To Baroque  

MUSI UN3129 History of Western Music II: Classical To the 20th Century  

Instrumental Instruction and Performance Courses

Please note: In the instrumental lesson listed below, all offered on a weekly, individual basis, a course of half-hour lessons earns 1 point of credit, and a course of one-hour lessons earns 2 points of credit. Unless otherwise indicated on auditions and registration is posted during the fall registration period by director of Music Performance Program.
 

MUSI BC1001 An Introduction to Music I. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Prerequisites: no previous knowledge of music is required.

A survey of the development of Western music from 6th-century Gregorian Chant to Bach and Handel, with emphasis upon important composers and forms. Extensive listening required.

Fall 2017: MUSI BC1001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 1001 001/03023 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
325 Milbank Hall
Gail Archer 3 15
MUSI 1001 002/07740 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
325 Milbank Hall
Marilyn McCoy 3 10

MUSI BC1002 An Introduction to Music II. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Prerequisites: no previous knowledge of music is required.

A survey of the development of Western music from the first Viennese Classical school at the end of the 18th century to the present, with emphasis upon composers and forms. Extensive listening required.

Spring 2018: MUSI BC1002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 1002 001/04952 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
325 Milbank Hall
Gail Archer 3 8
MUSI 1002 002/04976 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
325 Milbank Hall
Marilyn McCoy 3 11

MUSI BC1501 Voice Instruction. 2 points.

Entrance by audition only. Call Barnard College, Department of Music during registration for time and place of audition (854-5096).

Fall 2017: MUSI BC1501
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 1501 001/04505  
Gail Archer 2 29

MUSI BC1502 Voice Instruction. 2 points.

Entrance by audition only. Call Barnard College, Department of Music during registration for time and place of audition (854-5096).

Spring 2018: MUSI BC1502
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 1502 001/04991  
Gail Archer 2 29
MUSI 1502 002/03776  
Gail Archer 2 8

MUSI UN1593 Barnard-Columbia Chorus. 1 point.

May be taken for Pass credit only.

Prerequisites: auditions by appointment made at first meeting. Contact Barnard College, Department of Music (854-5096).

Membership in the chorus is open to all men and women in the University community. The chorus gives several public concerts each season, both on and off campus, often with other performing organizations. Sight-singing sessions offered. The repertory includes works from all periods of music literature. Students who register for chorus will receive a maximum of 4 points for four or more semesters.

Fall 2017: MUSI UN1593
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 1593 001/07743 T Th 6:05pm - 8:00pm
405 Milbank Hall
Gail Archer 1 25

MUSI UN1594 Barnard-Columbia Chorus. 1 point.

May be taken for Pass credit only.

Prerequisites: auditions by appointment made at first meeting. Contact Barnard College, Department of Music (854-5096).

Membership in the chorus is open to all men and women in the University community. The chorus gives several public concerts each season, both on and off campus, often with other performing organizations. Sight-singing sessions offered. The repertory includes works from all periods of music literature. Students who register for chorus will receive a maximum of 4 points for four or more semesters.

Spring 2018: MUSI UN1594
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 1594 001/05085 T Th 6:00pm - 8:00pm
405 Milbank Hall
Gail Archer 1 12

MUSI UN1595 Barnard-Columbia Chamber Singers. 1 point.

May be taken for Pass credit only.

Prerequisites: auditions by appointment made at first meeting. Contact Barnard College, Department of Music (854-5096).

Membership in the chorus is open to all men and women in the University community. The chorus gives several public concerts each season, both on and off campus, often with other performing organizations. Sight-singing sessions offered. The repertory includes works from all periods of music literature.

Fall 2017: MUSI UN1595
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 1595 001/07745 T Th 8:00pm - 9:30pm
405 Milbank Hall
Gail Archer 1 4

MUSI UN1596 Barnard-Columbia Chamber Singers. 1 point.

May be taken for Pass credit only.

Prerequisites: contact Barnard College, Department of Music (854-5096).

Membership in the chorus is open to all men and women in the University community. The chorus gives several public concerts each season, both on and off campus, often with other performing organizations. Sight-singing sessions offered. The repertory includes works from all periods of music literature.

Spring 2018: MUSI UN1596
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 1596 001/05333 T Th 8:00pm - 9:30pm
405 Milbank Hall
Gail Archer 1 3

MUSI BC3139 Introduction to Vocal Repertoire: Technique in Singing and Performance. 3 points.

This course is designed for developing singers. Group vocalizing, learning of songs and individual workshop performances are aimed at improving the student's  technical skill and the elements necessary to create a meaningful musical and dramatic experience. Attention to text, subtext, emotional and psychological aspects of a piece and the performer's  relationship to the audience are included in the work. Repertoire is predominantly in English and comes from both classical and popular traditions Individual coaching sessions are available with the class accompanist and help strengthen the students' confidence and skill. The class culminates with an in-class performance.

Fall 2017: MUSI BC3139
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3139 001/05250 F 12:00pm - 1:45pm
405 Milbank Hall
Jean-Paul Bjorlin 3 10
MUSI 3139 001/05250 M 5:15pm - 7:00pm
225 Milbank Hall
Jean-Paul Bjorlin 3 10
Spring 2018: MUSI BC3139
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3139 001/04804 F 2:00pm - 3:45pm
405 Milbank Hall
Josephine Mongiardo 3 15
MUSI 3139 001/04804 T 4:15pm - 6:00pm
225 Milbank Hall
Josephine Mongiardo 3 15

MUSI BC3140 Vocal Repertoire, Technique and Expression. 3 points.

Vocal exercises and exploration of wide-ranging repertoires, styles, and languages of the Western European song tradition. The rich variety of English, French, Italian and German poetry and music from the Baroque period through the Twentieth Century allows the student to experience both the music and the cultural environment of each of these styles. Attention is given both to meaning oftext and musical interpretation. Individual coaching sessions are available with the class accompanist and help strengthen the students' confidence and skill. The class culminates with an in-class performance.

Fall 2017: MUSI BC3140
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3140 001/04279 F 2:00pm - 3:45pm
405 Milbank Hall
Josephine Mongiardo 3 13
MUSI 3140 001/04279 T 4:15pm - 6:00pm
405 Milbank Hall
Josephine Mongiardo 3 13
Spring 2018: MUSI BC3140
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3140 001/06010 F 12:15pm - 2:00pm
405 Milbank Hall
Jean-Paul Bjorlin 3 8
MUSI 3140 001/06010 M 5:30pm - 7:15pm
225 Milbank Hall
Jean-Paul Bjorlin 3 8

MUSI BC3145 Worldmuse Ensemble. 3 points.

Worldmuse Ensemble delves into compelling music from many genres such as world music, gospel, classical--old and new. We perform without a conductor, increasing awareness and interaction among ourselves and our audience. We collaboratively integrate music, dance, and theatre traditions (masks etc.). For experienced singers, and instrumentalists and dancers who sing.

Spring 2018: MUSI BC3145
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3145 001/03263 F 2:15pm - 4:00pm
225 Milbank Hall
Jean-Paul Bjorlin 3 4
MUSI 3145 001/03263 M 7:30pm - 8:45pm
325 Milbank Hall
Jean-Paul Bjorlin 3 4

MUSI BC3990 Senior Project: Senior Research. 3 points.

Working with her advisor, a student will expand the research project initiated in the Fall Senior Seminar for Music Majors (BC3992x).  In order to satisfy the requirement, the student will complete a fifty page research paper.

Fall 2017: MUSI BC3990
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3990 001/00573  
Gail Archer 3 0
Spring 2018: MUSI BC3990
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3990 001/00573  
Gail Archer 3 1

MUSI BC3991 Senior Project: Music Repertoire. 0 points.

Working with her advisor, a student will develop a vocal or instrumental recital program with representative musical works from a variety of historical periods.   In order to satisfy the requirement, the student will present an hour long public performance of the recital program.  Students may also satisfy this requirement by composing original vocal or instrumental works.

Fall 2017: MUSI BC3991
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3991 001/02988  
Gail Archer 0 0
Spring 2018: MUSI BC3991
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3991 001/09798  
Gail Archer 0 1

MUSI BC3992 Senior Seminar for Music Majors. 3 points.

The goals of this seminar are a) to introduce senior music majors to ethnographic, bibliographic, and archival research methods in music and b) to help the same students develop, focus, implement, draft, revise, and polish a substantive, original piece of research (25-30 pages) which will serve as the senior project. The course will begin with a survey of academic literature on key problems in musicological research and writing, and will progress to a workshop/discussion format in which each week a different student is responsible for assigning readings and leading the discussion on a topic which s/he has formulated and deemed to be of relevance to her own research.

Fall 2017: MUSI BC3992
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3992 001/02342 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
227 Milbank Hall
Lauren Ninoshvili 3 4

MUSI G4122 Songs of the Troubadours. 4 points.

Prerequisites: HUMA W1123, MUSI V3128.

This interdisciplinary seminar approaches the songs of the troubadours as poetic and musical traditions. Together we will develop methods for analysis and interpretation, situate the songs within literary and social history, and address broad issues such as the nature of performance, the interplay between orality and writing, the origins of troubadour poetry, fin’amor, and gender. Students will learn to analyze the poetic and musical structure of the songs and to transcribe and edit them from medieval manuscripts. Weekly assignments in Paden’s Introduction to Old Occitan will familiarize students with the language of the texts; one hour a week will be devoted to going over texts in the original language using Paden’s book. Individually designed paper assignments will take students’ backgrounds into account; students from all departments are welcome.

MUSI G4461 Music and Place. 3 points.

This course provides an introduction to contemporary work on music and place from an ethnomusicological perspective. It situates ethnomusicological work and specific musical case studies from multiple geographical regions within an interdisciplinary theoretical framework that draws from the fields of cultural anthropology, cultural, media, and sound studies.

MUSI G4500 Jazz Transcription and Analysis. 3 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

A progressive course in transcribing, proceeding from single lines to full scale sections and ensembles. Stylistic analysis based on new and previously published transcriptions.

MUSI G4505 Jazz Arranging and Composition. 3 points.

Prerequisites: V2318-19 Diatonic Harmony or equivalent.

Course designed to train students to arrange and compose in a variety of historical jazz styles, including swing, bebop, hard bop, modal, fusion, Latin, and free jazz.

MUSI BC1002 An Introduction to Music II. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Prerequisites: no previous knowledge of music is required.

A survey of the development of Western music from the first Viennese Classical school at the end of the 18th century to the present, with emphasis upon composers and forms. Extensive listening required.

Spring 2018: MUSI BC1002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 1002 001/04952 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
325 Milbank Hall
Gail Archer 3 8
MUSI 1002 002/04976 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
325 Milbank Hall
Marilyn McCoy 3 11

MUSI V1580 Collegium Musicum. 1 point.

May be taken for Pass credit only.

Prerequisites: an audition to be held during the registration period. Contact the department for further details (854-3825).

Performance of vocal and instrumental music from the medieval, Renaissance, and baroque periods. The Collegium usually gives one public concert each term.

MUSI V1591 University Orchestra. 2 points.

Prerequisites: Audition required during first week of classes in FALL semester ONLY. Online audition sign up is available in August, two weeks prior to auditions, at mpp.music.columbia.edu. Questions can be directed to the Music Performance Program at mpp@columbia.edu or 212-854-1257.

The orchestra performs throughout the academic year in works spanning all periods of music including contemporary compositions. Distinguished guest soloists sometimes perform with the orchestra, and qualified student soloists may also have the opportunity either to perform or read concertos with the orchestra. Staff positions: a few persons interested in managerial work may gain experience as orchestra librarian and personnel manager.

MUSI V1598 Chamber Ensemble. 1 point.

Prerequisites: Audition required during first week of classes in FALL semester ONLY. Online audition sign up is available in August, two weeks prior to auditions, at mpp.music.columbia.edu. Questions can be directed to the Music Performance Program at mpp@columbia.edu or 212-854-1257.

Students registering for chamber music receive ensemble training with the performance associates. Student chamber ensembles perform a recital at the conclusion of each semester and are given other opportunities to perform throughout the academic year. See further mpp.music.columbia.edu for current list of Music Performance Associates.

MUSI V1618 Columbia University Jazz Ensemble. 1 point.

Prerequisites: Audition required during first week of classes in FALL semester ONLY. Online audition sign up is available in August, two weeks prior to auditions, at mpp.music.columbia.edu. Questions can be directed to the Music Performance Program at mpp@columbia.edu or 212-854-1257.

A small advanced jazz band. The repertoire will cover 1950's hard bop to more adventurous contemporary Avant Garde styles. Students will be required to compose and arrange for the group under the instructor's supervision. Visit mpp.music.columbia.edu for more information. 

MUSI V1625 World Music Ensemble. 1 point.

Prerequisites: Instructor Permission. Contact Music Performance Program at mpp@columbia.edu

Introduce students to specific non-western and non-classical styles and cultures through active participation in group lessons and rehearsal, culminating each semester in at least one public performance. Ensembles offered are: Arab Music; Bluegrass; Japanese Gagaku; Japanese Hogaku; Klezmer; Latin Music. Visit mpp.music.columbia.edu for more information.

MUSI V2010 Rock. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: HUMA W1123 or the equivalent.

Historical survey of rock music from its roots in the late 1940s to the present day.

MUSI V2020 Salsa, Soca, and Reggae: Popular Musics of the Caribbean. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART)., CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

A survey of the major syncretic urban popular music styles of the Caribbean, exploring their origins, development, and sociocultural context.

MUSI V2021 Popular Musics of the Americas: Music in Contemporary Native. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

"Music in Contemporary Native America" is a historical, ethnographic, and topical examination of contemporary Native American musical practices and ideologies. The course emphasizes popular, vernacular, and mass mediated musics, and calls into question the simple distinction between "traditional" and "modern" aspects of Native American cultures. Our readings and class guests (several of whom will be Native American scholars) emphasize the importance of understanding Native 2 American perspectives on these topics. Three short papers and one substantial final project are required. Approximately 100-150 pages of reading per week.

MUSI V2024 Mozart. 3 points.

Prerequisites: HUMA W1123 or the equivalent.

In this course we will study major works by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) in the context of Viennese classicism and its multiple audiences, the cultures of the Enlightenment, and the connections between biography and art. We will also consider Mozart’s impact on later composers and publics, the changing approaches to performing his music, and his role in popular culture. Reading knowledge of music is NOT required in this course, nor is a background beyond Music Humanities.

MUSI V2145 Russian Music from Glinka to Gubaidulina. 3 points.

Prerequisites: previous coursework in music (including HUMA W1123) or the instructor's permission.

Study of the principal musical trends and aesthetics of Russia's music from the 19th century to present which, in addition to art music, will also involve the study of opera, film, and ballet. Topics to be explored include the government's role in shaping a national music identity, the folk music that inspired much of Russia's art music, and the relationship between social realism and kitsch. Major composers studied: Glinka, Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninoff, Scriabin, Stravinsky, Shostakovich, and Prokofiev.

MUSI V2170 Music and dance from Romanticism to Mark Morris. 3 points.

An exploration of the music-dance relationship from Romanticism to Mark Morris. Specific topics to include Romanticism, Tchaikovsky, the Ballets Russes, Copland-Graham, Stravinsky-Balanchine, jazz/African-American traditions, Cage-Cunningham, and Mark Morris. Special attention will be paid to composer-choreographer collaboration; the interdependence of the musical and choreographic arts; and the role each art has played in the formal and aesthetic/historical development of the other

MUSI V3023 Late Beethoven. 3 points.

Prerequisites: MUSI V2318-V2319 or the instructor's permission.

An examination of the visionary works of Beethoven's last dozen or so years as a composer, beginning with the revision of his only opera, Fidelio, in 1814, and continuing with the late piano sonatas, cello sonatas, string quartets, Diabelli variations, Ninth Symphony, and the Missa Solemnis. Topics will include late style, romanticism, politics, deafness, and the changing nature of the musical work and its performance.

MUSI V3030 Asian American Music Studies. 3 points.

Prerequisites: one course in music or the instructor's permission.

This course will examine the diverse ways in which Asian Americans have understood and shaped their musical practices. We will explore the ways in which Asians have been represented via sound, text, and image, and will consider Asian Americans' participation in composed music traditions, jazz, traditional/folk music, diasporic music, improvised music, and popular musics. The course will reflect on readings from musicology, ethnomusicology, and music theory as well as fields outside of music in order to consider gender/sexuality, polyculturalism, and political activism.

MUSI V3127 Bach Vocal Music. 3 points.

Analysis of the vocal music of Johann Sebastian Bach in its historical and cultural context with particular focus on the sacred cantatas, the St. Matthew Passion and the B minor Mass.

MUSI V3138 The music of Brahms. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

Prerequisites: HUMA W1123 or the equivalent, and the ability to read musical notation.

Survey of the music of Brahms, examining a wide range of genres as well as his historical and cultural position.

MUSI V3142 Opera and Modernism. 3 points.

This course approaches the history of musical modernism through the lens of opera. Although we'll be consi dering many of the major stylistic movements of the twentieth century, we'll also be discussing how the sheer stubbornness of operatic tradition complicates narratives of development and progress. We'll be listening to six operas in their entirety: Claude Debussy's Pélleas et Mélisande, Alban Berg's Wozzeck, Igor Stravinsky's Oedipus Rex and The Rake's Progress, Benjamin Britten's The Turn of the Screw, and John Adams' Nixon in China.

MUSI V3170 20th Century Music. 3 points.

Prerequisites: HUMA W1123 or the instructor's permission.

A multicultural survey of composers, improvisors, sounds, practices, and social issues in 20th century music. Engages form, genre, style, canon, media reception, constructions of gender and race, cultural nationalisms, and the impact of transnationalism and globalization.

MUSI V3242 Projects in Composition II. 3 points.

Composition Faculty

Prerequisites: MUSI V3310 or the instructor's permission.

Composition in more extended forms. Survey of advanced techniques of contemporary composition. (Previously called Advanced Composition.)

MUSI V3302 Introduction to Set Theory. 3 points.

Prerequisites: MUSI V3322 and either V3126 or V3379, or the instructor's permission.

Fulfills the requirement of either the 3000-level advanced theory elective or the nontonal course. A study of the basic principles of set theory through the writings of Schoenberg, Babbitt, Forte, Martino, Lewin, et al. Concepts illustrated with examples from late 19th- and early 20th-century repertory.

MUSI V3305 Theories of Heinrich Schenker. 3 points.

Prerequisites: MUSI V3322 or the instructor's permission. Fulfills the requirement of either the 3000-level advanced theory elective or the nontonal course.

An examination of Schenker's concepts of the relation between strict counterpoint and free writing; "prolongation"; the "composing-out" of harmonies; the parallels and distinctions between "foreground," "middle ground," and "background"; and the interaction between composing-out and thematic processes to create "form.

MUSI V3330 Advanced Counterpoint. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: MUSI V3322 or the instructor's permission. Fulfills the requirement of the 3000-level advanced theory elective.

The study of baroque counterpoint in the style of J. S. Bach; general aspects of voice-leading; dances, inventions; canons; expositions of fugues.

MUSI V3420 The Social Science of Music. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: HUMA W1123 or the equivalent.

An introduction to the field of ethnomusicology in the context of the intellectual history of music scholarship.  IN FALL 2011, THIS COURSE WILL BE OFFERED TR 6:10-7:25 IN RM 622 DODGE.

MUSI V3435 Music and Literature in Latin America. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course is about the relationship between popular music and literature in Latin America. It covers such topics as the relationship between the lettered city and popular culture as well as orality and the written word. In the course we will read novels and poetry by authors who have also been composers and/or musicologists and explore the production of composers who have also been recognized as important literary figures.

MUSI V3462 Music, Gender and Performance. 3 points.

Prerequisites: there are no prerequisites for this course.

This seminar explores relationships between gender, music and performance from the perspective of ethnomusicology, cultural anthropology, critical music studies, feminist and queer theory and performance studies. We examine debates around issues of sex and gender and nature and culture through the lens of musical performance and experience. Some questions we consider include: In what ways is participation in particular music dictated by gendered conventions? What social purpose do these delineations serve? What might music tell us about the body? What is the relationship between performance and the ways in which masculinity and feminity, homosexuality and heterosexuality are shaped? How can we think about the concept of nation via gender and music? How might the gendered performances and the voices of musical celebrities come to represent or officially "speak" for the nation or particular publics? How does music shape our understanding of emotion, our experience of pleasure?

MUSI UN1500 Early Instruments. 1 point.

Prerequisites: Audition required during first week of classes in FALL semester ONLY. Online audition sign up is available in August, two weeks prior to auditions, at mpp.music.columbia.edu. Questions can be directed to the Music Performance Program at mpp@columbia.edu or 212-854-1257.

Prerequisites: Audition required during first week of classes in FALL semester ONLY. Online audition sign up is available in August, two weeks prior to auditions, at mpp.music.columbia.edu. Questions can be directed to the Music Performance Program at mpp@columbia.edu or 212-854-1257. Keyboards: K. Cooper. Strings: R. Morley. Wind instruments:  TBA.   $500 MUSIC LESSON FEE FOR NON-MAJORS/CONCENTRATORS.  All freshmen and sophomore students wishing tomajor/minor/concentrate in music, and thereby get their lesson fee waived, are required to make an appointment with Prof. Brad Garton (*Special jazz concentrators will meet with Prof. Chris Washburne), Dean of Undergraduate Studies, EVERY SEMESTER during the registration period, in order to register for appropriate courses.  Fees will not be waived without meeting this requirement.  All accepted MPP students must register for lessons and ensembles by the change-of-program deadline in order to be allowed to attend lessons that semester.  Petitioning students must notify MPP staff prior to this deadline.

MUSI W1501 Early Instruments. 1 point.

Prerequisites: Audition required during first week of classes in FALL semester ONLY. Online audition sign up is available in August, two weeks prior to auditions, at mpp.music.columbia.edu. Questions can be directed to the Music Performance Program at mpp@columbia.edu or 212-854-1257.

Keyboards: K. Cooper. Strings: R. Morley. Wind instruments:  TBA.  $500 MUSIC LESSON FEE FOR NON-MAJORS/CONCENTRATORS. All freshmen and sophomore students wishing to major/minor/concentrate in music, and thereby get their lesson fees waived, are required to make an appointment with Prof. Brad Garton ( *Special j azz concentrators will meet with Prof. Chris Washburne), Dean of Undergraduate Studies, EVERY SEMESTER during the registration period , in order to register for appropriate courses . Fees will not be waived without meeting this requirement. All accepted MPP students must register for lessons and ensembles by the change-of-program deadline in order to be allowed to attend lessons that semester. Petitioning students must notify MPP staff prior to this deadline.  

MUSI W1509 Organ Instruction I. 1 point.

Prerequisites: Accepting NEW STUDENTS in FALL semester ONLY. Contact Music Performance Program at mpp@columbia.edu

$500 MUSIC LESSON FEE FOR NON-MAJORS/CONCENTRATORS. All freshmen and sophomore students wishing to major/minor/concentrate in music, and thereby get their lesson fees waived, are required to make an appointment with Prof. Brad Garton ( *Special j azz concentrators will meet with Prof. Chris Washburne), Dean of Undergraduate Studies, EVERY SEMESTER during the registration period , in order to register for appropriate courses . Fees will not be waived without meeting this requirement. All accepted MPP students must register for lessons and ensembles by the change-of-program deadline in order to be allowed to attend lessons that semester. Petitioning students must notify MPP staff prior to this deadline.

MUSI W1513 Introduction To Piano I. 1 point.

Prerequisites: Instructor permission

$500 MUSIC LESSON FEE FOR NON-MAJORS/CONCENTRATORS. All freshmen and sophomore students wishing to major/minor/concentrate in music, and thereby get their lesson fees waived, are required to make an appointment with Prof. Brad Garton ( *Special j azz concentrators will meet with Prof. Chris Washburne), Dean of Undergraduate Studies, EVERY SEMESTER during the registration period , in order to register for appropriate courses . Fees will not be waived without meeting this requirement. All accepted MPP students must register for lessons and ensembles by the change-of-program deadline in order to be allowed to attend lessons that semester. Petitioning students must notify MPP staff prior to this deadline.  

MUSI W1515 Elementary Piano Instruction I. 1 point.

Prerequisites: Instructor permission

$500 MUSIC LESSON FEE FOR NON-MAJORS/CONCENTRATORS. All freshmen and sophomore students wishing to major/minor/concentrate in music, and thereby get their lesson fees waived, are required to make an appointment with Prof. Brad Garton ( *Special j azz concentrators will meet with Prof. Chris Washburne), Dean of Undergraduate Studies, EVERY SEMESTER during the registration period , in order to register for appropriate courses . Fees will not be waived without meeting this requirement. All accepted MPP students must register for lessons and ensembles by the change-of-program deadline in order to be allowed to attend lessons that semester. Petitioning students must notify MPP staff prior to this deadline.  

MUSI W1517 Keyboard Harmony and Musicianship. 1 point.

Prerequisites: Instructor

Lessons emphasize the progressive development of a harmonic vocabulary representative of the techniques of the central tradition of 18th- and 19th-century music.   $500 MUSIC LESSON FEE FOR NON-MAJORS/CONCENTRATORS. All freshmen and sophomore students wishing to major/minor/concentrate in music, and thereby get their lesson fees waived, are required to make an appointment with Prof. Brad Garton ( *Special j azz concentrators will meet with Prof. Chris Washburne), Dean of Undergraduate Studies, EVERY SEMESTER during the registration period , in order to register for appropriate courses . Fees will not be waived without meeting this requirement. All accepted MPP students must register for lessons and ensembles by the change-of-program deadline in order to be allowed to attend lessons that semester. Petitioning students must notify MPP staff prior to this deadline.

MUSI W1525 Instrumental Instruction I. 1 point.

Prerequisites: Audition required during first week of classes in FALL semester ONLY. Online audition sign up is available in August, two weeks prior to auditions, at mpp.music.columbia.edu. Questions can be directed to the Music Performance Program at mpp@columbia.edu or 212-854-1257.

$500 MUSIC LESSON FEE FOR NON-MAJORS/CONCENTRATORS. All freshmen and sophomore students wishing to major/minor/concentrate in music, and thereby get their lesson fees waived, are required to make an appointment with Prof. Brad Garton ( *Special j azz concentrators will meet with Prof. Chris Washburne), Dean of Undergraduate Studies, EVERY SEMESTER during the registration period , in order to register for appropriate courses . Fees will not be waived without meeting this requirement. All accepted MPP students must register for lessons and ensembles by the change-of-program deadline in order to be allowed to attend lessons that semester. Petitioning students must notify MPP staff prior to this deadline.  

MUSI W2515 Intermediate Piano Instruction I. 1 point.

Prerequisites: Instructor permission

$500 MUSIC LESSON FEE FOR NON-MAJORS/CONCENTRATORS. All freshmen and sophomore students wishing to major/minor/concentrate in music, and thereby get their lesson fees waived, are required to make an appointment with Prof. Brad Garton ( *Special j azz concentrators will meet with Prof. Chris Washburne), Dean of Undergraduate Studies, EVERY SEMESTER during the registration period , in order to register for appropriate courses . Fees will not be waived without meeting this requirement. All accepted MPP students must register for lessons and ensembles by the change-of-program deadline in order to be allowed to attend lessons that semester. Petitioning students must notify MPP staff prior to this deadline.  

MUSI W3515 Advanced Piano Instruction I. 1 point.

Prerequisites: Instructor Permission

$500 MUSIC LESSON FEE FOR NON-MAJORS/CONCENTRATORS. All freshmen and sophomore students wishing to major/minor/concentrate in music, and thereby get their lesson fees waived, are required to make an appointment with Prof. Brad Garton ( *Special j azz concentrators will meet with Prof. Chris Washburne), Dean of Undergraduate Studies, EVERY SEMESTER during the registration period , in order to register for appropriate courses . Fees will not be waived without meeting this requirement. All accepted MPP students must register for lessons and ensembles by the change-of-program deadline in order to be allowed to attend lessons that semester. Petitioning students must notify MPP staff prior to this deadline.  

MUSI W4035 Animal Music. 3 points.

Explores and compares the various listening traditions that have been applied from the late nineteenth century to the present to the songs of birds, whales, dogs, and other nonhuman animals.

MUSI W4102 Music and Writings of Wagner. 3 points.

The development of Wagner’s musical-dramatic style and critical thought, with special reference to The Flying Dutchman, Lohengrin, Die Walküre, Tristan und Isolde, and Parsifal, as well as selected prose writings in translation.

MUSI W4125 Puccini and the Twentieth Century. 3 points.

The popular and academic reputations of Giacomo Puccini have diverged more sharply than those of any other classical composer. This course aims less to "rehabilitate" Puccini than to imagine an alternate history of modernism in which his music plays a central role. Discussions will be centered around six operas, which we will be listening to in their entirety, as well as a variety of films, stage productions, and works by other composers. Major themes will include: sound studies and the history of technology; performance studies; theories of realism and modernism; and the relationship between Italian cultural politics and larger cosmopolitan and imperial formations.

MUSI W4126 European Music in America 1825-1950. 3 points.

The aim of this course is to provide a deeper understanding of the musical interactions between Europe and the United States from the first performance of an Italian opera sung in its original language in America (Gioachino Rossini's Il barbiere di Siviglia, 1825) until Arnold Schoenberg's death in Los Angeles in 1951. The course will address issues such as identity and cultural pride through music, the concept of a musical canon in America, and reception of European culture in the United States.

MUSI W4241 Advanced Projects in Composition. 3 points.

Prerequisites: grades obtained in V3241-V3242; compositions written in V3242; the instructor's permission.

Composition for larger ensembles, supported by study of contemporary repertoire.

MUSI W4242 Advanced Projects in Composition. 3 points.

Prerequisites: grades obtained in V3241-V3242; compositions written in V3242; the instructor's permission.

Composition for larger ensembles, supported by study of contemporary repertoire.

MUSI W4330 Recent Approaches to Classical Form. 3 points.

Prerequisites: HUMA W1123 and V2318-19 or equivalent, or the instructor's permission.

Introduction to William Caplin's theory of formal functions and James Hepokoski and Waren Darcy's Sonata Theory through analysis of works by Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven.

MUSI W4332 Computational Theories of Music and Music Cognition. 3 points.

Music Majors and Concentrators.

Prerequisites: Masterpieces of Western Music or the instructor's permission.

This course will introduce students to recent research on computational modeling of music perception and cognition. Emphasis will be placed on research that was either carried out by music theorists or has some clear and immediate relevance to music theory. We will study several computational models that simulate the perception of different aspects of musical structure, including rhythm, melody, harmony, counterpoint, texture, and key. While we must devote some time to the mathematics of these models, our primary focus will be on the larger theoretical implications for music theory and music cognition. We will also spend some time discussing computational methodologies in general and what they can tell us about music and perception.

MUSI W4405 Music and Language. 3 points.

Prerequisite: music major or instructor's permission. A survey of 20th-century literatures on the music/language relationship. Emphasis on semiotic and social-scientific paradigms.

MUSI W4420 Music and Property. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This courses raises the questions: 1) What does it mean to "own" music?, 2) In what senses can music be conceptualized as "property?"; and 3) How do divergent understandings of music's status as "property" shape contemporary debates and discourses in the particular areas of disputes over "illegal downloading" of copyrighted music and the "repatriation" of Native American musical recordings as "cultural property?" Several relevant major recent statements will be considered and responses discussed. Case studies from ethnomusicological, anthropological, media studies and legal literatures engage issues of appropriation, the role of new technologies in shifting the terrain of musical ownership will be studied. Hands-on look at the Columbia Center for Ethnomusicology's ongoing projects to repatriate historic recordings of Native American music (currently 'owned' by Columbia University) to the Navajo and Iñupiat tribes.

MUSI W4425 Popular Music in Brazil. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A comprehensive introduction to popular music in Brazil throughout the 20th century, exploring the connections between historical transformations and the rise of different musical genres.

MUSI W4435 Music and Performance in the African Postcolony. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course examines music and performance in various African contexts, focusing on the postcolonial period.  It will explore the complex interactions between music, politics, nation, race, and mediation through case studies from Ghana, Nigeria, DRC, Kenya, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, Namibia, and South Africa. In addition, discussions will involve what is meant to speak about "African music," and class will theorize about the conditions of musical production in the context of postcolonialism.

MUSI W4463 Silence. 3 points.

In our daily lives, we hear concomitant fluxes and negotiations of frequencies, of noises, of aural spaces, some seemingly organized, others seemingly chaotic. How do we become attuned to processing the myriad of acoustic information that envelops us? What remains inaudible to us? How are attempts made to make the inaudible audible? What might it mean to “hear without listening,” and what are the consequences? Throughout this course, we address these questions and others that arise by thinking through the relationship of silence and its “other.” Often, silence is defined in the negative sense—by its assumed opposites such as sound, noise, music, and voice. Decentering the notion of silence as absence, our discussions will draw from interdisciplinary sources and thus be framed by theories of silence and the presence of silence as sensible, historical, philosophical, aesthetic, stylistic, political, and ethical. Theorizing silence in these ways, we will work to understand silence not as the binary opposite of audible expressions, but rather as regulations of them, at times being the impetus for their emergence(s).

MUSI W4507 The New Thing: Jazz 1955-1980. 0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

An examination of the new jazz that emerged shortly after the middle of the 20th century.  The seminar will include the work of musicians such as Ornette Coleman, Cecil Taylor, Don Cherry, Anthony Braxton, Carla Cley, Albert Ayler, and the Arts Ensemble of Chicago; the economics and politics of the period; parallel developments in other arts; the rise of new performance spaces, recording companies, and collectives; and the accomplishments of the music and the problems it raised for jazz performance and criticism.

MUSI W4526 Orchestration. 3 points.

Prerequisites: MUSI W4525 (Instrumentation), or the instructor's permission.

The study of “functional” orchestration in works of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Students will analyze scores by Haydn, Beethoven, Schubert, Brahms, Wagner, Mahler, and other, and will write exercises in the style of these composers.

MUSI GU4540 Histories of Post-1960's Jazz. 3 points.

Prerequisites: HUMA W1123 or the equivalent.

Historiographical issues surrounding the performance of jazz and improvised musics after 1960. Topics include genre and canon formation, gender, race, and cultural nationalisms, economics and infrastructure, debates around art and the vernacular, globalization, and media reception. Reading knowledge of music is not required.

MUSI W4625 Timbre and Technology. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: HUMA W1123 or the instructor's permission.

The role of timbre, or tone color, in music of the last century combined with an introduction to recent computer tools for composition, analysis, and performance. Through close listening, we will examine 20th century composers' approaches to complex sounds, including Mahler, Debussy, Ravel, Schoenberg, Varese, Stockhausen, Grisey, Lachenmann and Leroux, as well as examples from popular and non-Western musics. Listening will be accompanied by writings on and by composers as well as background from the literature on music perception. Computer programs including AudioSculpt, OpenMusic, and Max/MSP will be used for lectures and exercises. Students are invited to apply the concepts explored in the course to their own fields of expertise in a final project and presentation.

MUSI W4626 Concepts of Musical Instrument in Electronic and Computer Music. 3 points.

Prerequisites: MUSI V2205 or the instructor's permission.

A central aspect of composing with computer media is designing the software system with which we will work; in other words, the composer, performer and/or improviser is often responsible for designing and assembling his own instrument. Electronic and Computer Music practices challenge our views of what a musical instrument is and how it is expected to behave. Through the analysis of various documents by a wide range of musicians as diverse as Theremin, Schaeffer, Stockhausen, Mathews, Moore, Tenney, Risset, Buchla, Moog, Mumma, Martirano, Waisvisz, Rowe, and Puckette amongst others, we will attempt to understand what new conceptions of musical instrument may have emerged with electric and digital media, and explore software implementations of some of their designs towards a final paper or computer system.

MUSI BC3990 Senior Project: Senior Research. 3 points.

Working with her advisor, a student will expand the research project initiated in the Fall Senior Seminar for Music Majors (BC3992x).  In order to satisfy the requirement, the student will complete a fifty page research paper.

Fall 2017: MUSI BC3990
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3990 001/00573  
Gail Archer 3 0
Spring 2018: MUSI BC3990
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3990 001/00573  
Gail Archer 3 1

MUSI BC3991 Senior Project: Music Repertoire. 0 points.

Working with her advisor, a student will develop a vocal or instrumental recital program with representative musical works from a variety of historical periods.   In order to satisfy the requirement, the student will present an hour long public performance of the recital program.  Students may also satisfy this requirement by composing original vocal or instrumental works.

Fall 2017: MUSI BC3991
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3991 001/02988  
Gail Archer 0 0
Spring 2018: MUSI BC3991
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3991 001/09798  
Gail Archer 0 1

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