Economics

http://economics.barnard.edu

208 LeFrak Center, Barnard Hall  
212-854-3454
212-854-8947 (fax)
Department Administrator: Robert O'Connor

Mission

The primary aim of the Barnard Economics Department is to provide undergraduate liberal arts students with a rigorous, broad, and critical program in theoretical and empirical economics. To achieve this aim our curriculum  

  • Provides a thorough grounding in neoclassical economic theory, modern statistical method, and their applications in the traditional fields of economic science;
  • Embeds that training in a broader conception of economic science and method with special emphasis on philosophical, historical, and institutional approaches that link economics with other social sciences and humanistic disciplines;
  • Compares and contrasts alternative methodological approaches and types of evidence as ways of analyzing economic phenomena, evaluating policy debates, and assessing the broader social and political consequences of economic doctrines.

Student Learning Outcomes for the Economics Major, Economics and Political Economy Tracks

Having successfully completed the major in Economics, the student will be able to attain the following outcomes:

  1. Show fluency in the basic concepts, models and tools of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory;
  2. Think critically about economic phenomena and economic debates by using multiple kinds of texts, evidence and conceptual approaches;
  3. Apply economic reasoning to understand the causal determinants of economic events, empirical regularities, and policy proposals;
  4. Apply basic skills of empirical reasoning to economic problems;
  5. Demonstrate knowledge of the history of economic thought, including important doctrines, their historical context, transformation over time, and influence on contemporary economic theory and ideas;
  6. Demonstrate understanding of institutions, organizations and markets in their roles of coordinating economic activity;
  7. Demonstrate knowledge of the historical origins of capitalism, modern economic growth and development, patterns of inequality, and globalization;
  8. Articulate a well-defined research question and conduct independent research using economic reasoning and evidence;
  9. Communicate economic ideas effectively in written or oral form.

Specific to the Economics Track

  1. Understand and apply statistical techniques to make inferences about economic hypotheses.

Specific to the Political Economy Track

  1. Use concepts or methods from at least one disciplinary approach other than economics to analyze an economic, political or other social problem.

Barnard will allow a total of 3 points AP credit in Economics only if the following conditions are satisfied: an AP score of 4 or 5 in either Macro or Micro (or both), or an International Baccalaureate (IB) score of 5 or higher.  However, students who receive AP credit for economics and who go on to pursue any of the economics department majors (or an economics minor) must still take  ECON BC1003 Introduction to Economic Reasoning  or its equivalent. For Statistics, Barnard will allow 3 points credit with a score of 5 on the Statistics AP exam. Economics track majors, however, will not be exempt from the statistics requirement ECON BC2411 Statistics for Economics or the equivalent, even if they receive 3 points AP credit for Statistics.

Chair: Sharon Harrison (Professor)
Professors: André Burgstaller, Alan Dye, Perry Mehrling, Lalith Munasinghe, Rajiv Sethi (Ann Whitney Olin Professor), David Weiman (Alena Wels Hirschorn '58 Professor)
Associate Professors: Randall Reback, Ashley Timmer (Adjunct)
Assistant Professors: Belinda Archibong, Dolore Bushati (Adjunct), Aboozar Hadavand (Adjunct), Sonia Pereira (Adjunct),  Anja Tolonen, Homa Zarghamee
Associates: Luis Silva-Yanez (Adjunct)

Other officers of the University offering courses listed below:

Professors:  Jushan Bai, Alessandra Casella, Graciela Chichilnisky, Pierre-André Chiappori, Donald Davis, Prajit Dutta, Harrison Hong, Navin Kartik, Wojciech Kopczuk, Simon Lee, Serena Ng,  Brendan O’Flaherty,  Xavier Sala-i-Martin, David Weinstein
Associate Professor:  Lena Edlund, Katherine Ho, Qingmin Liu, Jon Steinsson, Jonathan Vogel
Assistant Professors:  Mark Dean, Andres Drenik, Francois Gerard, Reka Juhasz, Adam Kapor, Jose Luis Montiel Olea, Pietro Ortoleva, Mikka Rokkanen
Adjunct Professors:  Steven Ho
Lecturers:  Tri Vi Dang, Sally Davidson, Susan Elmes, Seyhan Erden, Sunil Gulati, Ronald Miller, Caterina Musatti

Requirements for the Major

There are two tracks for the major in Economics equal in rigor, but different in scope and focus. The track in Economics emphasizes modern economic theory along with associated analytical and mathematical tools.  The track in Political Economy emphasizes the roots of modern economics in the history of economic thought and the interconnections between social forces, political institutions, and economic power. Either track offers excellent preparation for graduate study in a variety of professional schools and professional careers in many areas, including business and public administration.

Prospective majors should discuss their programs with any member of the department no later than the second semester of their sophomore year. At the time of declaring the major, the student meets with the department chair and chooses a major adviser, who will advise her on the choice of program and courses. Students planning to major in Economics or Political Economy should complete both intermediate macro- and microeconomic theory by the beginning of their junior year.

Students who wish to complete a double or joint major that includes Economics should consult the chair of the department or the major adviser as early as possible. Students interested in pursuing a Ph.D. in economics should take more mathematics than required for the economics major or choose the Economics and Mathematics interdisciplinary major. Any interested student should seek guidance from the Economics and/or Mathematics faculty on which mathematics courses to take.

All majors should file the "Major Requirements Declaration" form, available from the department office by the end of their sophomore year, or as soon as possible thereafter.

Economics

The Economics track major requires twelve courses in economics, including:

ECON BC1003Introduction to Economic Reasoning3
ECON BC1007Mathematical Methods for Economics *4
or MATH UN1201 Calculus III
ECON BC2411Statistics for Economics4
or STAT UN1101 Introduction to Statistics
or STAT UN1201 Calculus-Based Introduction to Statistics
or PSYC BC1101 Statistics
ECON BC3018Econometrics4
ECON BC3033Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory4
ECON BC3035Intermediate Microeconomic Theory4
ECON BC3041Theoretical Foundations of Political Economy3
Three electives in economics, two of which must be upper-level (that is, they must have intermediate micro- or macroeconomic theory as a prerequisite).
One of the following two options:
Senior Thesis I
and Senior Thesis II
Senior Seminar (and an additional upper-level elective in economics)
*

Students will not receive credit for ECON BC1007 Mathematical Methods for Economics if they have already taken ECON BC3035 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory. Such students must instead complete the mathematics requirement by taking MATH UN1201 Calculus III (Calculus III).

Political Economy

The Political Economy track major requires thirteen courses, including:

ECON BC1003Introduction to Economic Reasoning3
ECON BC1007Mathematical Methods for Economics4
or MATH UN1101 Calculus I
ECON BC3033Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory4
ECON BC3035Intermediate Microeconomic Theory4
ECON BC3041Theoretical Foundations of Political Economy3
Three electives in economics, two of which must be upper-level electives (that is, they must have intermediate micro- or macroeconomic theory as a prerequisite)
Three interdisciplinary electives (see further conditions below)
And one of the following two options:
Senior Thesis I
and Senior Thesis II
Senior Seminar (and an additional upper-level elective in economics)


We recommend that all Political Economy track majors—especially those who plan to go on to business school or to graduate school in public administration or international relations—take ECON BC2411 Statistics for Economics or equivalent.

Interdisciplinary Electives

The three interdisciplinary electives may be taken from any Related Area of Study (listed below), or in an area approved by the major adviser. Two of the interdisciplinary electives must be “linked” to one of the economics electives taken to fulfill the major requirement, and at least one of the linked interdisciplinary electives must be at the 3000-level or higher. The remaining “unlinked” interdisciplinary elective requirement may be satisfied by taking any course in a Related Area of Study, or a statistics course, such as ECON BC2411 Statistics for Economics, STAT UN1101 Introduction to Statistics, STAT UN1201 Calculus-Based Introduction to Statistics, or ECON BC3018 Econometrics.

Linking interdisciplinary electives to economics electives: If a course is “linked,” this means that it addresses subject matter that is related to the subject matter of the economics elective to which it is paired. There are many possible ways to link a course to an economics elective. A weblink to some suggestions from the department website is given below. Whether a course qualifies as a linked course must be approved by the student’s major adviser.

Related Areas of Study

Departments

  • Anthropology
  • Asian and Middle Eastern Cultures
  • Environmental Science
  • History
  • Philosophy
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Sociology
  • Spanish and Latin American Cultures
  • Women's Studies

Regional or Interdisciplinary Programs

  • Africana Studies
  • American Studies
  • Human Rights Studies
  • Jewish Studies
  • Science and Public Policy
  • Urban Studies

Suggestions for Linking Interdisciplinary Electives to Economics Electives

Follow this link for a list of suggestions for Interdisciplinary Electives that link to Economics Elective Courses. It is NOT an exhaustive list. You should feel free to propose alternative courses that form similar links. All linked courses must be approved by the student’s major adviser.


Mathematics Training for the Major

The department expects all majors to have a working knowledge of arithmetic, high school algebra, and the fundamentals of analytic geometry.

Majors in the economics track may complete the mathematics requirement by taking ECON BC1007 Mathematical Methods for Economics, or MATH UN1101 Calculus I and MATH UN1201 Calculus III. Students who have received advanced placement credit or have placed out of Calculus I may take either Math Methods or Calculus III to complete the requirement. (Students with 5 on the Calculus BC test may begin with Calculus III.)

Majors in the political economy track may complete the mathematics requirement by taking ECON BC1007 Mathematical Methods for Economics or MATH UN1101 Calculus I. Students who have received advanced placement college credit for calculus have satisfied the mathematics requirement for the political economy track, however they must take an additional economics elective as a substitute for the AP credit so that the total number of courses taken for the major remains the same.

Students interested in pursuing a Ph.D. in economics should take more mathematics than required for the economics major or choose the Economics and Mathematics interdisciplinary major. Any interested student should seek guidance from the Economics and/or Mathematics faculty on which mathematics courses to take.

Requirements for the Minor

The minor in economics consists of five courses, including ECON BC1003 Introduction to Economic Reasoning or equivalent, ECON BC3033 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory or ECON BC3035 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory, and three electives, one of which must have an intermediate micro- or macroeconomic theory course as a prerequisite.

Introductory Courses

The principles of economics; may be taken without previous study of economics.

ECON BC1003 Introduction to Economic Reasoning. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Covers basic elements of microeconomic and marcoeconomic reasoning at an introductory level. Topics include Individual Constraints and Preferences, Production by Firms, Market Transactions, Competition, The Distribution of Income, Technological Progress and Growth, Unemployment and Inflation, the Role of Government in the Economy.  Note: Students cannot get credit for ECON BC1003 if they have taken the Columbia introductory course ECON W1105 Principles of Economics.

Fall 2017: ECON BC1003
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 1003 001/04582 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
903 Altschul Hall
Rajiv Sethi 3 47/50
ECON 1003 002/03020 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
302 Barnard Hall
Homa Zarghamee 3 46/55
ECON 1003 003/02004 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Ll104 Diana Center
Sonia Pereira 3 35/50
Spring 2018: ECON BC1003
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 1003 001/04582 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Belinda Archibong 3 50/50
ECON 1003 002/06347 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Sonia Pereira 3 50/50

ECON BC1007 Mathematical Methods for Economics. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Quantitative and Deductive Reasoning (QUA).

Covers basic mathematical methods required for intermediate theory courses and upper level electives in economics, with a strong emphasis on applications. Topics include simultaneous equations, functions, partial differentiation, optimization of functions of more than one variable, constrained optimization, and financial mathematics. This course satisfies the Calculus requirement for the Economics major. NOTE: students who have previously taken Intermediate Micro Theory (ECON BC3035 or the equivalent) are *not* allowed to take Math Methods for Economics.

Fall 2017: ECON BC1007
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 1007 001/04511 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
302 Barnard Hall
Sharon Harrison 4 30
Spring 2018: ECON BC1007
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 1007 001/03020 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Ll103 Diana Center
Sharon Harrison 4 75

General Courses

May be taken with minimal previous study of economics.

ECON BC2010 The Economics of Gender. 3 points.

Examination of gender differences in the U.S. and other advanced industrial economies. Topics include the division of labor between home and market, the relationship between labor force participation and family structure, the gender earnings gap, occupational segregation, discrimination, and historical, racial, and ethnic group comparisons.

ECON BC2012 Economic History of Western Europe. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course is an introduction to the transformative economic developments that began in Western Europe and spread globally. It applies economic and empirical reasoning to analyze the underlying forces of modern economic development from pre-modern Europe to the Industrial Revolution and the emergence of a global economy.

ECON BC2020 Introduction to Development Economics. 3 points.

Students will be introduced to current issues within development economics, and to fundamental economic concepts explaining economic growth. It will discuss the crosscutting themes of gender equality and environmental sustainability, while approaching topics within economic growth, population growth, human capital, health, agriculture, urbanization, natural resources, conflict, and institutions.

Spring 2018: ECON BC2020
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 2020 001/01161 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Anja Tolonen 3 80/80

ECON UN2029 FED Challenge Workshop. 1 point.

Prerequisites: (ECON UN1105)

The workshop prepares students to compete in the annual College Fed Challenge sponsored by the Federal Reserve. Topics covered include macroeconomic and financial conditions, monetary policy, financial stability and the Federal Reserve System.

Fall 2017: ECON UN2029
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 2029 001/29644 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
516 Hamilton Hall
Susan Elmes 1 37/50

ECON BC2075 Logic and Limits of Economic Justice. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Economic Reasoning (ECON BC 1003) or Principles of Economics (ECON W1105). An introductory course in political theory or political philosophy is strongly recommended, but not required.

Introduce students to problems of economic justice under capitalism.  Course has three goals: (1) expose students to debates between economics and philosophers about the meaning and nature of justice, (2) explore conflict between efficiency and justice, (3) examine implications of justice for gender equality, intergenerational equity and climate change.

IEOR E2261 Introduction to Accounting and Finance. 3 points.

Lect: 3.

Prerequisites: (ECON UN1105)

For undergraduates only. This course is required for all undergraduate students majoring in IE, OR:EMS, OR:FE and OR. This course examines the fundamental concepts of financial accounting and finance, from the perspective of both managers and investors. Key topics covered in this course include principles of accrual accounting; recognizing and recording accounting transactions; preparation and analysis of financial statements, including balance sheets, income statements, cash flow statements, and statements of owners' equity; ratio analysis; pro-forma projections; time value of money (present values, future values and interest/discount rates); inflation; discounted-cash-flow (DCF) project evaluation methods; deterministic and probabilistic measures of risk; capital budgeting. 

Fall 2017: IEOR E2261
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
IEOR 2261 001/19101 F 10:10am - 12:40pm
304 Barnard Hall
Anthony Webster 3 116/147
Spring 2018: IEOR E2261
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
IEOR 2261 001/16213 F 10:10am - 12:40pm
428 Pupin Laboratories
Anthony Webster 3 120/120

ECHS BC2590 Measuring History: Empirical Approaches to Economic and Social History. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

This course examines big themes in economic and social history-population history and human well-being, inequality and poverty, and gender differences. Using these themes, it adopts a hands-on data-driven approach to introduce tools and concepts of empirical reasoning. Datasets related to each theme create opportunities for learning by doing.

Spring 2018: ECHS BC2590
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECHS 2590 001/08899 M W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
Room TBA
Alan Dye 4 24/25

Quantitative Methods

These courses are required for the Economics track and are optional for the Political Economy track.

ECON BC2411 Statistics for Economics. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Quantitative and Deductive Reasoning (QUA).

Elementary computational methods in statistics. Basic techniques in regression analysis of econometric models. One-hour weekly recitation sessions to complement lectures.

Fall 2017: ECON BC2411
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 2411 001/03459 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
324 Milbank Hall
Elizabeth Kopko 4 21/50

ECON BC3018 Econometrics. 4 points.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3033 or ECON BC3035, and ECON BC2411 or STAT W1111 or STAT W1211, or permission of the instructor.

Specification, estimation and evaluation of economic relationships using economic theory, data, and statistical inference; testable implications of economic theories; econometric analysis of topics such as consumption, investment, wages and unemployment, and financial markets.

Fall 2017: ECON BC3018
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3018 001/01690 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
903 Altschul Hall
Anja Tolonen 4 34/45
Spring 2018: ECON BC3018
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3018 001/04759 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Homa Zarghamee 4 45/45

Core Theory Courses

The courses listed below, required of both Political Economy and Economics track majors, constitute the core of the Barnard Economics major.

ECON BC3033 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory. 4 points.

Prerequisites: An introductory course in economics and a functioning knowledge of high school algebra and analytical geometry or permission of the instructor.

Systematic exposition of current macroeconomic theories of unemployment, inflation, and international financial adjustments.

Fall 2017: ECON BC3033
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3033 001/06157 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
504 Diana Center
Andre Burgstaller 4 19
Spring 2018: ECON BC3033
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3033 001/06157 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Luis Silva-Yanez 4 31/50

ECON BC3035 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory. 4 points.

Prerequisites: An introductory course in microeconomics or a combined macro/micro principles course (ECON BC1003 or ECON W1105, or the equivalent) and one semester of calculus or ECON BC1007, or permission of the instructor.

Preferences and demand; production, cost, and supply; behavior of markets in partial equilibrium; resource allocation in general equilibrium; pricing of goods and services under alternative market structures; implications of individual decision-making for labor supply; income distribution, welfare, and public policy. Emphasis on problem solving.

Fall 2017: ECON BC3035
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3035 001/04588 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
302 Barnard Hall
Lalith Munasinghe 4 41/60
Spring 2018: ECON BC3035
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3035 001/04588 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
323 Milbank Hall
Lalith Munasinghe 4 44/50

ECON BC3041 Theoretical Foundations of Political Economy. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.

Prerequisites: An introductory course in economics or permission of the instructor.

Intellectual origins of the main schools of thought in political economy. Study of the founding texts in classical political economy, Marxian economics, neoclassicism, and Keynesianism.

Fall 2017: ECON BC3041
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3041 001/07742 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
328 Milbank Hall
David Weiman 3 33/45
ECON 3041 002/08111 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
Ll104 Diana Center
Belinda Archibong 3 34/45
Spring 2018: ECON BC3041
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3041 001/07742 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Sonia Pereira 3 44/45

Upper-Level Elective Courses

The following economics elective courses have as a minimum either ECON BC3033, ECON BC3035, or both as prerequisites.

ECON BC3011 Inequality and Poverty. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035 or ECON BC3033, or permission of the instructor.

Conceptualization and measurement of inequality and poverty, poverty traps and distributional dynamics, economics and politics of public policies, in both poor and rich countries.

Spring 2018: ECON BC3011
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3011 001/05251 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Ashley Timmer 3 64/65

ECON BC3012 Economics of Education. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035 and ECON BC2411 or permission of the instructor.

Analyzes education policies and education markets from an economic perspective. Examines challenges that arise when researchers attempt to identify the causal effects of inputs. Other topics: (1) education as an investment, (2) public school finance, (3) teacher labor markets, (4) testing/accountability programs, (5) school choice programs, and (6) urban public school reforms.

ECON BC3013 Economic History of the United States. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035 or ECON BC3033, or permission of the instructor.

Economic transformation of the United States from a small, open agrarian society in the late colonial era to the leading industrial economy of the 20th century. Emphasis is given to the quantitative, institutional, and spatial dimensions of economic growth, and the relationship between the changing structures of the economy and state.

Spring 2018: ECON BC3013
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3013 001/02981 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
302 Barnard Hall
David Weiman 3 52

ECON BC3017 Economics of Business Organization. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035 or permission of the instructor.

Economics of firm organization and the evolution of the modern business enterprise. The function of organizations in coordinating the use of economic resources. The role of technology, labor, management, and markets in the formation of the business enterprise. Includes international comparisons and attention to alternative economic theories on the role of business organizations on national competitive advantage.

ECON BC3019 Labor Economics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035, or permission of the instructor.

Factors affecting the allocation and remuneration of labor; population structure; unionization and monopsony; education and training, mobility and information; sex and race discrimination; unemployment; and public policy.

Fall 2017: ECON BC3019
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3019 001/08324 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
302 Barnard Hall
Lalith Munasinghe 3 20/50

ECON BC3022 Economic History of Europe. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035 or ECON BC3033 (or their equivalents), or permission of the instructor.

An introduction to the transformative economic developments that began in Western Europe and spread globally. This course applies economic and empirical reasoning to analyze the industrial revolution, its underlying causes and consequences, from pre-modern times to the 20th-century emergence of a global economy.

Fall 2017: ECON BC3022
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3022 001/09446 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Ll104 Diana Center
Alan Dye 3 33/50

ECON BC3023 Topics in Economic History. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035 or ECON BC3033, or permission of the instructor

Topics vary in content.  Fall 2011 topic: The American Century.

ECON BC3024 Migration and Economic Change. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: (Econ BC 3035) or (Econ BC 3033)

This course examines a wide variety of topics about migration and its relationship to economic development, globalization, and social and economic mobility.  At its core, this course reflects a key reality: that the movement of people--within regions, within countries, and across borders--is both the result of and impetus for economic change.

ECON UN3025 Financial Economics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON W3211, W3213 and STAT 1201.

Institutional nature and economic function of financial markets. Emphasis on both domestic and international markets (debt, stock, foreign exchange, eurobond, eurocurrency, futures, options, and others). Principles of security pricing and portfolio management; the Capital Asset Pricing Model and the Efficient Markets Hypothesis.

Fall 2017: ECON UN3025
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3025 001/73730 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
207 Mathematics Building
Gernot Mueller 3 124/150
Spring 2018: ECON UN3025
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3025 001/01678 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Jose Cao-Alvira 3 107/110
ECON 3025 002/66412 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Irasema Alonso 3 110/110

ECON BC3031 Economics of Life. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035

This course covers an immense variety of topics in what might be called demographic economics. Included are dating and marriage, along with the economics of beauty; fertility and its avoidance; how people use their time, and what determines those uses, including some discussion of labor-force behavior; interactions among family members—bargaining in the household and with family members outside the household; divorce; the economics of addiction, to such agents as alcohol, other drugs, tobacco and even work; religion, including its effects on economic outcomes; and death, including how we die, how long we live, and the nature and determinants of bequests. The central unifying feature throughout the course is the concentration on the economics of these activities and outcomes—the roles of incentives and institutions in affecting them.

ECON BC3029 Empirical Development Economics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: (ECON BC3035 or ECON BC3033) and ECON UN3412 ECON BC3035 or ECON BC3033 and Econometrics, or permission of the instructor.

Examination of new challenges in the global economy from unequal income distribution and poor institutions to health epidemics and natural disasters. Accessing and analyzing real-time and historic data to understand the current global economy.  Applied econometric techniques.

ECON BC3038 International Money and Finance. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3033.

Introduction to balance of payments and exchange rate theory; capital mobility and expectations; internal and external adjustment under fixed and flexible exchange rates; international financial markets; capital mobility and expectations; international policy coordination and optimum currency areas; history of the international monetary system.

Fall 2017: ECON BC3038
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3038 001/03989 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
202 Altschul Hall
Andre Burgstaller 3 58/105

ECON BC3039 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON BC1003 or ECON W1105. Prerequisite for Economics majors: ECON BC3035.

Link between economic behavior and environmental quality: valuation of non-market benefits of pollution abatement; emissions standards; taxes; and transferable discharge permits. Specific problems of hazardous waste; the distribution of hazardous pollutants across different sub-groups of the U.S. population; the exploitation of commonly owned natural resources; and the links between the environment, income distribution, and economic development.

Spring 2018: ECON BC3039
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3039 001/08879 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Ll103 Diana Center
Belinda Archibong 3 50/60

ECON BC3045 Business Cycles. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3033.

Theories and policy implications of business cycles. IS/LM, AS/AD and the Phillips Curve; dynamic general equilibrium models based on microfoundations including the Real Business Cycle model; New Keynesian models; models of the political business cycle. Particular episodes in the macroeconomic history of the US will provide case studies in which to study these models and the application of policies within.

ECON BC3047 International Trade. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035.

Causes and consequences of international trade and investment. Theoretical models of trade. Trade policy including restrictions or regulations on international trade and the effects of such policies on economic welfare, economic growth and wage inequality. Multinationals, foreign direct investment, and some aspects of the current debate on globalization.

ECON BC3099 Independent Study. 1-3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3033 or ECON BC3035 or permission of the instructor.

Topic(s), requirements, workload and point value to be determined in consultation with faculty advisor. Forms available at the Office of the Registrar.

ECON UN3265 The Economics of Money and Banking. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3033 and ECON BC3035 or the equivalent.

Introduction to the principles of money and banking. The intermediary institutions of the American economy and their historical developments, current issues in monetary and financial reform.

Fall 2017: ECON UN3265
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3265 001/05362 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
202 Altschul Hall
Jose Cao-Alvira 3 85
Spring 2018: ECON UN3265
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3265 001/60204 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Tri Vi Dang 3 110/110

ECON BC3270 Topics in Money and Finance. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3033 and ECON BC3035. Limited to 25 students.

Classic questions in monetary economics, including but not limited to: inside and outside money, financial crisis and hyperinflation, central banking and the payments system, liquidity and market making, monetary policy and exchange rates.

Senior Requirement

Economics majors must take EITHER Senior Thesis I and Senior Thesis II OR a Senior Seminar  plus an additional upper-level economics elective.

ECON BC3061 Senior Thesis I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and completion of all courses (except for the senior requirement) required for the economics track, political economy track, or economics and mathematics majors. Exceptions to these prerequisites may be granted by the chair of the department only.

Tutorials and conferences on the research for and writing of the senior thesis.  This is the 1st semester of a two-semester course sequence.

Fall 2017: ECON BC3061
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3061 001/03575  
Sonia Pereira 4 8
ECON 3061 002/05329 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
303 Altschul Hall
Randall Reback 4 6
ECON 3061 003/04820 W 9:00am - 10:50am
118 Barnard Hall
David Weiman 4 1
ECON 3061 004/04872  
0. FACULTY 4 0
Spring 2018: ECON BC3061
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3061 001/04029  
4 0

ECON BC3062 Senior Thesis II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and completion of all courses (except for the senior requirement) required for the economics track, political economy track, or economics and mathematics majors. Exceptions to these prerequisites may be granted by the chair of the department only.

Tutorials and conferences on the research for and writing of the senior thesis.  This is the 2nd semester of a two-semester course sequence.

Spring 2018: ECON BC3062
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3062 001/04590  
Sonia Pereira 4 6
ECON 3062 002/03966 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Randall Reback 4 4
ECON 3062 003/08224  
David Weiman 4 1
ECON 3062 004/01944  
4 0

ECON BC3063 Senior Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and the completion of all courses (except for the senior requirement) required for the economics track, political economy track, or economics and mathematics majors. Exceptions to these prerequisites may be granted by the chair of the department only. Seminar sections are limited to 15 students.

A topic in economic theory or policy of the instructor’s choice. See department for current topics and for senior requirement preference forms.

Fall 2017: ECON BC3063
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3063 001/03378 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
501 Diana Center
Rajiv Sethi 4 16
ECON 3063 002/06514 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
203 Diana Center
Belinda Archibong 4 13
Spring 2018: ECON BC3063
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3063 001/02840 Th 11:00am - 12:50pm
Room TBA
Homa Zarghamee 4 19
ECON 3063 002/05970 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
117 Barnard Hall
Lalith Munasinghe 4 8
ECON 3063 003/02843 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Anja Tolonen 4 13

Cross-Listed Courses

Economics

ECON UN1105 Principles of Economics. 4 points.

Corequisites: ECON UN1155

How a market economy determines the relative prices of goods, factors of production, and the allocation of resources and the circumstances under which it does it efficiently. Why such an economy has fluctuations and how they may becontrolled.

Fall 2017: ECON UN1105
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 1105 001/27504 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
309 Havemeyer Hall
Sunil Gulati 4 209/250
ECON 1105 002/74744 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
309 Havemeyer Hall
Ronald Miller 4 119/189
ECON 1105 003/23575 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
501 Northwest Corner
Wouter Vergote 4 160/164
Spring 2018: ECON UN1105
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 1105 001/60694 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Sunil Gulati 4 220/220
ECON 1105 002/66410 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
Room TBA
Nicola Zaniboni 4 108/189
ECON 1105 003/17144 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
501 Schermerhorn Hall
Wouter Vergote 4 176/189

ECON UN2029 FED Challenge Workshop. 1 point.

Prerequisites: (ECON UN1105)

The workshop prepares students to compete in the annual College Fed Challenge sponsored by the Federal Reserve. Topics covered include macroeconomic and financial conditions, monetary policy, financial stability and the Federal Reserve System.

Fall 2017: ECON UN2029
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 2029 001/29644 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
516 Hamilton Hall
Susan Elmes 1 37/50

ECON UN2105 The American Economy. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON UN1105

The course surveys issues of interest in the American economy, including economic measurement, well-being and income distribution, business cycles and recession, the labor and housing markets, saving and wealth, fiscal policy, banking and finance, and topics in central banking. We study historical issues, institutions, measurement, current performance and recent research.

Fall 2017: ECON UN2105
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 2105 001/18671 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
5ab Kraft Center
Claudia Halbac 3 39/65

STEM BC2223 Computer Programming for the Behavioral Sciences. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Quantitative and Deductive Reasoning (QUA).

Students will learn how to write computer programs that can test theories and predictions that arise in the behavioral sciences. For students with little or no programming background. 

Spring 2018: STEM BC2223
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
STEM 2223 001/08876 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Lisa Son, Rajiv Sethi 4 17/24

ECON UN2257 Global Economy. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON UN1105

Covers five areas within the general field of international economics: (i) microeconomic issues of why countries trade, how the gains from trade are distributed, and protectionism; (ii) macroeconomic issues such as exchange rates, balance of payments and open economy macroeconomic adjustment, (iii) the role of international institutions (World Bank, IMF, etc); (iv) economic development and (v) economies in transition.

Spring 2018: ECON UN2257
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 2257 001/64094 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
301 Pupin Laboratories
Ronald Miller 3 77/189

ECON UN3025 Financial Economics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON W3211, W3213 and STAT 1201.

Institutional nature and economic function of financial markets. Emphasis on both domestic and international markets (debt, stock, foreign exchange, eurobond, eurocurrency, futures, options, and others). Principles of security pricing and portfolio management; the Capital Asset Pricing Model and the Efficient Markets Hypothesis.

Fall 2017: ECON UN3025
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3025 001/73730 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
207 Mathematics Building
Gernot Mueller 3 124/150
Spring 2018: ECON UN3025
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3025 001/01678 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Jose Cao-Alvira 3 107/110
ECON 3025 002/66412 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Irasema Alonso 3 110/110

ECON UN3211 Intermediate Microeconomics. 4 points.

Prerequisites: ECON UN1105 and MATH UN1101 and (MATH UN1201 or MATH UN1207)

The determination of the relative prices of goods and factors of production and the allocation of resources.

Fall 2017: ECON UN3211
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3211 001/19494 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
702 Hamilton Hall
Qingmin Liu 4 66/86
ECON 3211 002/63203 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
717 Hamilton Hall
Qingmin Liu 4 80/86
ECON 3211 003/10417 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
310 Fayerweather
Susan Elmes 4 86/96
Spring 2018: ECON UN3211
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3211 001/28553 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
602 Hamilton Hall
Ingmar Nyman 4 86/86
ECON 3211 002/25793 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
717 Hamilton Hall
Caterina Musatti 4 86/86
ECON 3211 003/17455 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Wouter Vergote 4 86/86
ECON 3211 004/26033 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Wouter Vergote 4 86/86

ECON UN3213 Intermediate Macroeconomics. 4 points.

Prerequisites: (MATH UN1101 or MATH UN1207) and ECON UN1105 or the equivalent.
Corequisites: MATH UN1201

This course covers the determination of output, employment, inflation and interest rates. Topics include economic growth, business cycles, monetary and fiscal policy, consumption and savings and national income accounting.  

Fall 2017: ECON UN3213
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3213 001/24603 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
329 Pupin Laboratories
Irasema Alonso 4 71/100
ECON 3213 002/14776 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
417 International Affairs Bldg
Xavier Sala-I-Martin 4 302/350
Spring 2018: ECON UN3213
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3213 001/22211 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe 4 47/120
ECON 3213 002/69791 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Jon Steinsson 4 110/110
ECON 3213 003/28577 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
717 Hamilton Hall
Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe 4 81/86

ECON UN3265 The Economics of Money and Banking. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3033 and ECON BC3035 or the equivalent.

Introduction to the principles of money and banking. The intermediary institutions of the American economy and their historical developments, current issues in monetary and financial reform.

Fall 2017: ECON UN3265
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3265 001/05362 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
202 Altschul Hall
Jose Cao-Alvira 3 85
Spring 2018: ECON UN3265
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3265 001/60204 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Tri Vi Dang 3 110/110

ECON UN3412 Introduction To Econometrics. 4 points.

Prerequisites: (ECON UN3211 or ECON UN3213) and (MATH UN1201 or MATH UN1207) and STAT UN1201

Modern econometric methods; the general linear statistical model and its extensions; simultaneous equations and the identification problem; time series problems; forecasting methods; extensive practice with the analysis of different types of data.

Fall 2017: ECON UN3412
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3412 001/67565 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
703 Hamilton Hall
Gregory Cox 4 27/54
ECON 3412 002/19916 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
717 Hamilton Hall
Jushan Bai 4 71/86
ECON 3412 003/77224 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
602 Hamilton Hall
Seyhan Erden 4 80/86
Spring 2018: ECON UN3412
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3412 001/27923 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
702 Hamilton Hall
Seyhan Erden 4 86/86
ECON 3412 002/62682 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Seyhan Erden 4 86/86
ECON 3412 003/23495 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Simon Lee 4 48/86

ECON GU4020 Economics of Uncertainty and Information. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON UN3211 and ECON UN3213 and STAT UN1201

Topics include behavior uncertainty, expected utility hypothesis, insurance, portfolio choice, principle agent problems, screening and signaling, and information theories of financial intermediation.

Fall 2017: ECON GU4020
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4020 001/24501 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Pierre-Andre Chiappori 3 18/60

ECON GU4211 Advanced Microeconomics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON UN3211 and ECON UN3213 and MATH UN2010
Corequisites: MATH UN2500,MATH GU4061

The course provides a rigorous introduction to microeconomics. Topics will vary with the instructor but will include consumer theory, producer theory, general equilibrium and welfare, social choice theory, game theory and information economics. This course is strongly recommended for students considering graduate work in economics.

Spring 2018: ECON GU4211
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4211 001/22643 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Susan Elmes 3 36/64

ECON GU4213 Advanced Macroeconomics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON UN3211 and ECON UN3213 and ECON UN3412 and MATH UN2010 ECON W3211, W3213, W3412 and MATH V2010.

An introduction to the dynamic models used in the study of modern macroeconomics. Applications of the models will include theoretical issues such as optimal lifetime consumption decisions and policy issues such as inflation targeting. This course is strongly recommended for students considering graduate work in economics.

Fall 2017: ECON GU4213
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4213 001/21370 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
1024 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Andres Drenik 3 11/60

ECON GU4228 Urban Economics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON UN3211 and ECON UN3213

Congestion and other games, and the pricing of transit services. Location theory and land rents. Segregation and discrimination. The fiscal structure of American cities. Zoning and the taking issue. Abandonment and city-owned property. Economic development, abatements, subsidies, and eminent domain. Crime, deadweight losses, and the allocation of police services.

Spring 2018: ECON GU4228
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4228 001/76244 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
Room TBA
Jason Barr 3 86/86

ECON GU4230 Economics of New York City. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON UN3211 and ECON UN3213 and STAT UN1201

This course takes New York as our laboratory. Economics is about individual choice subject to constraints and the ways that choices sum up to something often much more than the parts. The fundamental feature of any city is the combination of those forces that bring people together and those that push them apart. Thus both physical and social space will be central to our discussions. The underlying theoretical and empirical analysis will touch on spatial aspects of urban economics, regional, and even international economics. We will aim to see these features in New York City taken as a whole, as well as in specific neighborhoods of the city. We will match these theoretical and empirical analyses with readings that reflect close observation of specific subjects. The close observation is meant to inspire you to probe deeply into a topic in order that the tools and approaches of economics may illuminate these issues in a fresh way.

ECON GU4251 Industrial Organization. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON UN3211 and ECON UN3213

The study of industrial behavior based on game-theoretic oligopoly models. Topics include pricing models, strategic aspects of business practice, vertical integration, and technological innovation.

Fall 2017: ECON GU4251
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4251 001/27389 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
702 Hamilton Hall
Katherine Ho 3 56/86
Spring 2018: ECON GU4251
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4251 001/14814  
3 0/96

ECON GU4280 Corporate Finance. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON UN3211 and ECON UN3213 and STAT UN1201

An introduction to the economics principles underlying the financial decisions of firms. The topics covered include bond and stock valuations, capital budgeting, dividend policy, market efficiency, risk valuation, and risk management. For information regarding REGISTRATION for this course, go to: http://econ.columbia.edu/registration-information.

Fall 2017: ECON GU4280
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4280 001/26424 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
702 Hamilton Hall
Ethan Namvar 3 57/75
ECON 4280 002/75855 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
702 Hamilton Hall
Tri Vi Dang 3 75/75
ECON 4280 003/29772 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
407 International Affairs Bldg
Steven Ho 3 39/64
Spring 2018: ECON GU4280
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4280 001/27578 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
602 Hamilton Hall
Kairong Xiao 3 45/70
ECON 4280 002/61760 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Tri Vi Dang 3 58/75

ECON GU4301 Economic Growth and Development. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON UN3211 and ECON UN3213

Empirical findings on economic development, theoretical development models; problems of efficient resource allocation in a growing economy; balanced and unbalanced growth in closed and open economic systems; the role of capital accumulation and innovation in economic growth.

Fall 2017: ECON GU4301
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4301 001/70208 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
717 Hamilton Hall
Xavier Sala-I-Martin 3 74/86

ECON GU4321 Economic Development. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON UN3211 and ECON UN3213

Historical comparative examination of the economic development problems of the less developed countries; the roles of social institutions and human resource development; the functions of urbanization, rural development, and international trade.

Spring 2018: ECON GU4321
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4321 001/21804 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
411 International Affairs Bldg
3 32

ECON GU4325 Economic Organization and Development of Japan. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: ECON UN3211 and ECON UN3213

The growth and structural changes of the post-World War II economy; its historical roots; interactions with cultural, social, and political institutions; economic relations with the rest of the world.

Fall 2017: ECON GU4325
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4325 001/18420 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
833 Seeley W. Mudd Building
David Weinstein 3 96/110

ECON GU4370 Political Economy. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON UN3211 and ECON UN3213 and STAT UN1201 or POLS 4710 for those who declared prior to Spring 2014.

The course studies the interaction between government and markets. The first part discusses market failures and the scope and limits of government intervention, including the use of modified market-type tools (for example, cap-and-trade regulations for pollution). The second part discusses collective decision-making, in particular voting and its properties and pathologies. The final part discusses economic inequality and government's role in addressing it.

Fall 2017: ECON GU4370
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4370 001/12810 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
517 Hamilton Hall
John Marshall 3 47/86

ECON GU4400 Labor Economics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON UN3211 and ECON UN3213

The labor force and labor markets, educational and man power training, unions and collective bargaining, mobility and immobility, sex and race discrimination, unemployment.

Spring 2018: ECON GU4400
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4400 001/28491 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Lena Edlund 3 21/54

ECON GU4412 Advanced Econometrics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON UN3211ECON UN3213ECON UN3412MATH UN2010

The linear regression model will be presented in matrix form and basic asymptotic theory will be introduced. The course will also introduce students to basic time series methods for forecasting and analyzing economic data. Students will be expected to apply the tools to real data.

Fall 2017: ECON GU4412
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4412 001/28434 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
214 Pupin Laboratories
Seyhan Erden 3 24/60

ECON GU4415 Game Theory. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON UN3211 and ECON UN3213

Introduction to the systematic treatment of game theory and its applications in economic analysis.

Fall 2017: ECON GU4415
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4415 001/28682 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
833 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Benjamin Ho 3 78/110
Spring 2018: ECON GU4415
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4415 001/26950 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
203 Mathematics Building
Benjamin Ho 3 110/110

ECON GU4465 Public Economics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON UN3211 and ECON UN3213

Types of market failures and rationales for government intervention in the economy. Benefit-cost analysis and the theory of public goods. Positive and normative aspects of taxation. The U.S. tax structure.

Fall 2017: ECON GU4465
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4465 001/11588 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
717 Hamilton Hall
Wojciech Kopczuk 3 23/86
Spring 2018: ECON GU4465
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4465 001/64189  
3 0/96

ECON GU4480 Gender and Applied Economics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON UN3211 and ECON UN3213

This course studies gender gaps, their extent, determinants and consequences. The focus will be on the allocation of rights in different cultures and over time, why women's rights have typically been more limited and why most societies have traditionally favored males in the allocation of resources.

Spring 2018: ECON GU4480
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4480 001/75105 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Lena Edlund 3 27/54

ECON GU4500 International Trade. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON UN3211 and ECON UN3213

The theory of international trade, comparative advantage and the factor endowments explanation of trade, analysis of the theory and practice of commercial policy, economic integration. International mobility of capital and labor; the North-South debate.

Fall 2017: ECON GU4500
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4500 001/12999 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
717 Hamilton Hall
Reka Juhasz 3 48/86
Spring 2018: ECON GU4500
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4500 001/66535 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Reka Juhasz 3 86/86

ECON G4526 Transition Reforms, Globalization and Financial Crisis. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: ECON W3211 and W3213.

Covers reform issues in transition economies such as price liberalizatin, currency reform, asset privatization, macroeconomic stabilization, trade liberalization and exchange rate policies, and foreign resource flows with suitable examples from the experience of the transition economies of Russia, the post-Soviet states, East-central Europe, China and Vietnam.

ECON GU4750 Globalization and Its Risks. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON UN3211ECON UN3213

The world is being transformed by dramatic increases in flows of people, goods and services across nations. Globalization has the potential for enormous gains but is also associated to serious risks. The gains are related to international commerce where the industrial countries dominate, while the risks involve the global environment, poverty and the satisfaction of basic needs that affect in great measure the developing nations. Both are linked to a historical division of the world into the North and the South-the industrial and the developing nations. Key to future evolution are (1) the creation of new markets that trade privately produced public goods, such as knowledge and greenhouse gas emissions, as in the Kyoto Protocol; (2) the updating of the Breton Woods Institutions, including the creation of a Knowledge Bank and an International Bank for Environmental Settlements.

Spring 2018: ECON GU4750
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4750 001/26844 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
Room TBA
Graciela Chichilnisky 3 86/86

ECON G4527 Economic Organization and Development of China. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON W3211 and W3213.

An analytical survey of the economic organization of China, with reference to population and land resources, agriculture, industries, transportation, trade, and finance. The social and cultural forces affecting economic development.

Industrial Engineering and Operations Research

IEOR E2261 Introduction to Accounting and Finance. 3 points.

Lect: 3.

Prerequisites: (ECON UN1105)

For undergraduates only. This course is required for all undergraduate students majoring in IE, OR:EMS, OR:FE and OR. This course examines the fundamental concepts of financial accounting and finance, from the perspective of both managers and investors. Key topics covered in this course include principles of accrual accounting; recognizing and recording accounting transactions; preparation and analysis of financial statements, including balance sheets, income statements, cash flow statements, and statements of owners' equity; ratio analysis; pro-forma projections; time value of money (present values, future values and interest/discount rates); inflation; discounted-cash-flow (DCF) project evaluation methods; deterministic and probabilistic measures of risk; capital budgeting. 

Fall 2017: IEOR E2261
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
IEOR 2261 001/19101 F 10:10am - 12:40pm
304 Barnard Hall
Anthony Webster 3 116/147
Spring 2018: IEOR E2261
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
IEOR 2261 001/16213 F 10:10am - 12:40pm
428 Pupin Laboratories
Anthony Webster 3 120/120